• We invite you to join UKWorkshop.
    Members can turn off viewing Ads!

Oak top in WC... part 2 - next problem

UKworkshop.co.uk

Help Support UKworkshop.co.uk:

Lee J

Established Member
Joined
20 Nov 2008
Messages
551
Reaction score
0
I opened a thread in the Finishing section about the same project but this is a different question. I have what is basically an off the shelf B&Q cupboard carcase (top, bottom and 2 sides made from chip board) and I have made my own doors. I want to put a solid oak top on this cupboard but I'm a little unsure of the best way to fix the oak top to the carcase top. It's about an inch think solid oak, approx L: 500mm W: 290mm.
It's going onto 3/4 inch chipboard.

Some options I thought of were doweling, just gluing or a combo of both. Maybe even drilling straight through the oak into the cupboard and putting a dowel through the lot, to make the dowel top visable.

any suggestions?
 

Pete Maddex

Established Member
Joined
22 Apr 2005
Messages
9,172
Reaction score
125
Location
Nottingham
Hi, Lee

The main thing to consider is that the oak will expand and contract, so a couple or three screws (stainless steel or brass) in the back from the inside and the same in slots or oversized holes and washers in the front.

If you don't allow for expansion and contraction it will pull its self apart, due to humidity changes.

Pete
 

Lee J

Established Member
Joined
20 Nov 2008
Messages
551
Reaction score
0
right so screw from underneath/inside the cupcoard, slots or oversized holes in the carcase and screw into the underside of the oak?

3 at the back, 2 at the front?
 

jasonB

Established Member
Joined
26 Nov 2004
Messages
5,044
Reaction score
1
Location
Surrey
Thats it, the back ones don't need to be slotted as its best to keep any movement at the front so it does not crack any silicon joint between top & wall.

J
 

Lee J

Established Member
Joined
20 Nov 2008
Messages
551
Reaction score
0
just one more question JasonB, which way will the slots run? with the grain (left to right) or across the grain (front to back)? as I look at the unit top the grain runs lengthways... left to right. like this...

 

Lee J

Established Member
Joined
20 Nov 2008
Messages
551
Reaction score
0
and I guess I dont need to tighten the life out of the screws then? just nip them?
 

Lee J

Established Member
Joined
20 Nov 2008
Messages
551
Reaction score
0
OK, next issue...

I'm putting oak tops on the boxing in that goes down one side and across the end of the WC room. So I cleverly cut the pieces so the join lines are behind the 15mm radiator pipes but look what I didn't account for...



yes, you guessed it, I cant get the blooming piece to fit in now.



I'm thinking 2 possible solutions here...

1. drain the heating system, remove the radiator, fit the oak, replace and re-pressure the system
2. split this piece in 2 using a fine bandsaw blade and a steady hand, possibly making the cut at a slight angle so I can put the left bit on first the slot the right bit straight in.

your thoughts fellas...
 

Bluekingfisher

Established Member
Joined
16 Mar 2009
Messages
1,524
Reaction score
4
Location
Land o' Burns.
Lee - If you are competent at plumbing and happy to drain the system that woyuld be the way to go from an aesthetics view, of course I'm sure you know that.

The only problem is, if you have to remove for maintenance in the future then you will have to drain again or damage the piece to get it out.

Of course you could make up a spare in case you need to remove the radiatior in the future but removing rads isn't a weekly occurence so you might never need the spare section. Best to be cautious though

Just my take on it.

David
 

Lee J

Established Member
Joined
20 Nov 2008
Messages
551
Reaction score
0
Oh I'm fine with the plumbing, I have just fitted this very radiator only this weekend. It's just bugging me cos if I need to get to the inside of the boxing in then I'll be removing radiator again. If I split the piece it'll make it easier. hmmm
 

Bluekingfisher

Established Member
Joined
16 Mar 2009
Messages
1,524
Reaction score
4
Location
Land o' Burns.
A definate dilemma mate but for me personally, every time I sat on the loo I would see that joint and wish I had spent the couple of hours doing it the way I would like it to have been, rather than make a joint it and have it done in 10 mins.

I guess what I'm saying is, in a few weeks time you'll forget the grief you had removing the rad again but the joint will always remind you.

That's just me of course and for you may not be an issue.

Good luck either way.
 

jasonB

Established Member
Joined
26 Nov 2004
Messages
5,044
Reaction score
1
Location
Surrey
How tight is it if you angle it the other way eg one end down under the nut and the other up towards the rad then lower the high side down.

Before draining the system is there enough sideways movement in the pipework to allow for just shutting the valves, not opening the vent valve, undoing the right hand valve from the rad and moving the pipe slightly sideways so the oak can fit in. If it can't be done by airlocking teh rad at worse just drain that rad not teh whole system.

J
 

AndyT

Established Member
Joined
24 Jul 2007
Messages
12,028
Reaction score
500
Location
Bristol
If that were mine, I wouldn't make the new cut in the middle of the problem piece; I'd just cut off one of the back corners, ie the bit that will end up behind a pipe, against the wall. That will allow you to fit it, and most of the time any visible line will be hidden in the shadow of the pipework. (So choose whichever end is less noticeable, or less well lit.)

To stick the odd corner piece in place, I'd use a dab of glue, if it needs anything.
Use the finest saw you have to make the cut.
 

Lee J

Established Member
Joined
20 Nov 2008
Messages
551
Reaction score
0
I've just got back on here from sorting this out. Rad drained and piece popped in. looks good, glad i did it properly. although I wasn't impresed with 3 gallon of water down my right jumper sleeve!
 
Top