Quantcast

Log burner in garage advice

UKworkshop.co.uk

Help Support UKworkshop.co.uk:

lathehunter

Member
Joined
17 Jun 2016
Messages
5
Reaction score
0
Location
Gravesend
I have converted my concrete block with asbestos roof construction garage to a workshop with patio doors and now want to fit a small log burner.
My question is can I run the flue 1.8mtr up from the stove and use a 90 degree bend to go through the wall and have the pipe end just proud of the outside wall? The reason being I don't want to cut the roofing material.
Any advise would be appreciated
 

sunnybob

wysiwyg
Joined
11 Oct 2014
Messages
8,399
Reaction score
150
Location
cyprus
90 degree bends tend to cause flue problems. avoid them if you can by fitting 135 degree and going through the wall at an angle. More work, but a much better efficiency of heat.
 

Phil Pascoe

occasional purveyor of blunt tools.
UKW Supporter
Joined
29 Jan 2012
Messages
19,051
Reaction score
234
Location
Shaft City, Mid Cornish Desert
90 degree bends are a no no to stove fitters - use two 135s. If you fit a stove ensure your garage is quite draught proof and well insulated or you will guarantee condensation problems.
 

Doug B

Shy Tot
Joined
6 Aug 2008
Messages
2,914
Reaction score
95
Location
@dougsworkshop
phil.p":qqr7ysj7 said:
If you fit a stove ensure your garage is quite draught proof
Possibly the most dangerous “advice” I’ve seen on a forum, people die from carbon monoxide poisoning cause by lack of air supply to stoves, what ever you do decide to do DON’T seal up your garage if you intend to fit & use a log burner .
 

MikeG.

No longer posting.
Joined
24 Aug 2008
Messages
10,176
Reaction score
650
Location
Essex/ Suffolk border
Doug B":31pflqcb said:
phil.p":31pflqcb said:
If you fit a stove ensure your garage is quite draught proof
Possibly the most dangerous “advice” I’ve seen on a forum, people die from carbon monoxide poisoning cause by lack of air supply to stoves, what ever you do decide to do DON’T seal up your garage if you intend to fit & use a log burner .
The ideal situation is a dedicated air vent situated adjacent to the woodburner, and a carbon monoxide alarm. Even better, it is possible with many woodburners to pipe the air supply direct into the bottom of the stove. This removes draughts from the room and ensures that the fire will at all times have the air it needs to work.

ETA....

Just to be a bit pedantic, it isn't the lack of air supply to the stove which causes a build up of carbon monoxide, it is a leakage of the products of combustion into the room exacerbated by a lack of a fresh air supply to the room occupants. It is perfectly possible to have a room sealed air supply to the fire (ie the ideal situation), and yet still have carbon monoxide levels rising in the room.
 

Doug B

Shy Tot
Joined
6 Aug 2008
Messages
2,914
Reaction score
95
Location
@dougsworkshop
MikeG.":2b35z6ue said:
Just to be a bit pedantic, it isn't the lack of air supply to the stove which causes a build up of carbon monoxide, it is a leakage of the products of combustion into the room exacerbated by a lack of a fresh air supply to the room occupants. .
To be fair Mike the two are inextricably linked as your sentence also suggests, the bottom line is a wood burner needs ventilation & by its nature an open vent where ever it is placed will cause a draught, I have no idea who the OP is but clearly by asking this question he is showing his lack of knowledge so folks should be careful what they say in reply.
 

Marineboy

Established Member
Joined
11 Mar 2016
Messages
528
Reaction score
0
Location
Northumberland
The log burner in my lounge does not have a room sealed air supply, just the ‘normal’ ventilation which comes in via the doors etc in my leaky Victorian house. However, I have never noticed any draughts, I think the combustion process is so efficient that the demand for air is well controlled.
 

doctor Bob

Established Member
Joined
22 Jun 2011
Messages
3,596
Reaction score
142
Location
Matching Green
I may well be talking out of my ass, but if it's not fitted by a hetas installer (I don't think you have mentioned whos installing) I supect any insurance etc would be null and void.
 

Woody2Shoes

Impressive Member
Joined
5 Jan 2015
Messages
1,490
Reaction score
36
Location
Sussex UK
I think it's worth mentioning that a significant proportion of the heat that you get by burning wood in a logburner actually comes from burning CO - which is a calorific gas in its own right, and used to be a significant component of "town gas" derived from coal. In other words, a correctly functioning stove will create and burn CO - the problem comes, as Mike and others indicate, if that gets drawn out into your breathing space.

I would check that a 6ft flue is long enough (it probably isn't - the manufacturer's data sheet should specify) to provide a satisfactory "draw" - which is necessary for efficient and safe combustion (as it helps to prevent a downdraft which would put CO etc into the room). The flue terminal also needs to be positioned correctly in relation to the ridge of the roof (looking at Building Regs would help here - Parts J and L from memory). Building Regs are also useful as they give guidance on minimum hearth sizes and other construction rules - the other obvious hazard being fire!

There would be a lot to be said for getting a HETAS installer to supervise/sign-off an installation such as this. I believe that HETAS regs can be found online as can Building Regs.

I have CO detectors and fire alarms wherever I have a solid fuel stove.

Cheers, W2S
 

chaoticbob

Established Member
Joined
14 Nov 2012
Messages
342
Reaction score
0
Location
Wirksworth
lathehunter":u3tnybsu said:
I have converted my concrete block with asbestos roof construction garage to a workshop with patio doors and now want to fit a small log burner.
My question is can I run the flue 1.8mtr up from the stove and use a 90 degree bend to go through the wall and have the pipe end just proud of the outside wall? The reason being I don't want to cut the roofing material.
Any advise would be appreciated
If you are thinking of an 1.8m rise inside the garage and the outlet protruding horizontally outside the wall without any external vertical flue, the answer is an unequivocal 'no'. Apart from safety considerations, you simply won't get enough updraught to run the stove properly. You will need an insulated vertical external flue at least 3m long.
As W2S said, HETAS guidelines are available online - eg here.
Well worth a read.
You don't need to have a HETAS engineer do the installation, but if you want to comply with building regs and insurance requirements you need to get one in to sign it off - they fix a riveted plate on the work certifying conformity.
I suppose most of us with home workshops take risks from time to time, but in my case I sort of creep up on danger - whoops, that was a bit scary, not going there again. You might not get that option with carbon monoxide poisoning or fire though.
Obviously I have been down this route myself - I ended up taking professional advice.
Robin
 

Latest posts

Top