Quantcast

Kity 419 Table Saw

UKworkshop.co.uk

Help Support UKworkshop.co.uk:

Giff

Established Member
Joined
14 Jun 2009
Messages
625
Reaction score
1
Location
Cheshire UK
Does anyone have a user manual for this saw. ( Kity 419) or know where to get one.My brother has bought a s/h one and would like to know a bit more about it. Thanks Geoff
 

marcros

(Trevanion)+1
Joined
11 Feb 2011
Messages
10,278
Reaction score
211
Location
Leeds
i am sure that somebody will have one. In the meantime, you could download the manual for the axminster ts200, which is cloned from the kity.

The manual, when you track it down, is unlikely to tell you much- it is pretty useless (the manual, not the saw).
 

Giff

Established Member
Joined
14 Jun 2009
Messages
625
Reaction score
1
Location
Cheshire UK
Thanks Marcros. I wondered about that ! He is new to woodworking and needs all the help he can get ! I'll look for the ts200. Geoff
 

marcros

(Trevanion)+1
Joined
11 Feb 2011
Messages
10,278
Reaction score
211
Location
Leeds
if you wanted a present idea, the workshop essentials dvd on table saw use could be a good idea.
 

Giff

Established Member
Joined
14 Jun 2009
Messages
625
Reaction score
1
Location
Cheshire UK
Yes I have got that.....actually ALL of them ! Good suggestion for April :)
 

Eric The Viking

Established Member
Joined
19 Jan 2010
Messages
6,584
Reaction score
51
Location
Bristle, CUBA (the County that Used to Be Avon)
I had one until very recently. I think it's a jolly good saw for what it is, but there are three significant issues:

1. Dust extraction. The chute round the blade clogs up. A common mod in the past was simply to knock off the side opposite the motor, so dust coudn't get trapped, and to extract from underneath the saw.

2. The trunnion mountings. I seriously hope Kity changed these on later production runs, but in case they didn't:

The 'trunnions' aren't really trunnions, but the two pivots for the tilt action of the saw. There's a pair of 'yokes' underneath the tabletop, one at each end, with a pair of bolts for each, clamping said yokes in place. The two pivots each sit in the middle of these yokes, and there is allowancew for side-to-side adjustment, so you can align the blade accurately parallel to the mitre tracks. This you need to do, obviously.

On mine, the pairs of bolts were just countersunk Allen-headed (M6, IIRC), secured underneath with an anti-shake washer and an ordinary nut. To align the blade, you need to:
  1. fit a spanner underneath the table,
  2. ease off each bolt,
  3. slide the trunnion sideways to taste
  4. tighten everything up again and double check it didn't slip whilst being tightened.
This would be straightforward if it wasn't for (1.), as the bolts line up very awkwardly with the frame both at the front and the back - there's no room to swing a small earwig, and you certainly can't get a socket wrench (or even a ring spanner) on them. Prepare for a lot of cursing, barked knuckles, etc.

The fix is to make a small steel plate, with a pair of clearance holes and nuts tack-welded on, the same distance apart as the holes in the tabletop. File off the lugs on the aluminium yoke castings and make them smooth underneath so your new clamping plate can slide properly. Replace the two individual nuts with the new arrangement. Voila! You can now loosen and tighten the crucial bolts simply by applying an Allen key from above. You might equally just drill + tap two holes in a bit of plate instead, but I didn't have thick enough plate and tacking nuts on was quicker.

3. The rise/fall and tilt wheel. As supplied it's very easy to strip/damage the plastic wheel. It has to slide in and out on its shaft, and it's held on by a pair of grub screws, which run in slots on the shaft - they need to grip very slightly, but still be able to slide, and they must be done up so they protrude symetrically inside the handle's boss.

These grubs are harder steel than the shaft. Get the amount of pinch wrong or significantly asymmetric, and they will chew up the shaft, which in turn will rip up the plastic inside the boss of the handwheel. A new handwheel is a "mere" 40 quid, plus VAT, plus postage, (but it is supplied with a picture of Homer going, "D'oh!"). Great design, Kity.

If you get a 419 secondhand, the very first thing I'd check is the state of that shaft. Loosen the grub screws gently and evenly on each side of the handwheel. Slide the handwheel right off the shaft and inspect the shaft for sharp edges that may cut into the handwheel itself. If you find any, gently smooth it off with emery cloth or a file. Clean both shaft and handwheel boss carefully to remove swarf, and probably lubricate them slightly (Vaselene is probably good for this application). Make sure the grub screws are set up just right - especially not too loose.

Finally, perverts have succeeded in making zero-clearance insert plates for the 419. I know this because I've read the boasts elsewhere about how "easy" it was. I expect the same people also go bog-snorkelling and amputate their own earlobes for 'manly bets'.

For the rest of us a ZCI is a practical impossibility. The fix is to make a sled of plywood or similar that either runs in the mitre tracks or aligns with the edges of the table, or just sits on top without moving. There are plenty of good designs out there. It's true you'll lose a slight amount of maximum cut depth, but you'll achieve the advantages of a ZCI without the pain of doing the "I" bit.

Hope this helps.

E.
 

Giff

Established Member
Joined
14 Jun 2009
Messages
625
Reaction score
1
Location
Cheshire UK
Brilliant "hands on stuff Eric. I did have, ages ago, a Kitty spindle moulder and had a problem with the hand wheel / shaft so I expect that is a similar problem. Thanks again for putting that all down on paper... Best Geoff
 

MikeJhn

Grunkel
Joined
2 Sep 2014
Messages
4,016
Reaction score
41
Location
Kent mostly and France the rest
Eric The Viking":1czlz1e0 said:
2. The trunnion mountings. I seriously hope Kity changed these on later production runs, but in case they didn't:

The 'trunnions' aren't really trunnions, but the two pivots for the tilt action of the saw. There's a pair of 'yokes' underneath the tabletop, one at each end, with a pair of bolts for each, clamping said yokes in place. The two pivots each sit in the middle of these yokes, and there is allowancew for side-to-side adjustment, so you can align the blade accurately parallel to the mitre tracks. This you need to do, obviously.

On mine, the pairs of bolts were just countersunk Allen-headed (M6, IIRC), secured underneath with an anti-shake washer and an ordinary nut. To align the blade, you need to:
  1. fit a spanner underneath the table,
  2. ease off each bolt,
  3. slide the trunnion sideways to taste
  4. tighten everything up again and double check it didn't slip whilst being tightened.
This would be straightforward if it wasn't for (1.), as the bolts line up very awkwardly with the frame both at the front and the back - there's no room to swing a small earwig, and you certainly can't get a socket wrench (or even a ring spanner) on them. Prepare for a lot of cursing, barked knuckles, etc.

The fix is to make a small steel plate, with a pair of clearance holes and nuts tack-welded on, the same distance apart as the holes in the tabletop. File off the lugs on the aluminium yoke castings and make them smooth underneath so your new clamping plate can slide properly. Replace the two individual nuts with the new arrangement. Voila! You can now loosen and tighten the crucial bolts simply by applying an Allen key from above. You might equally just drill + tap two holes in a bit of plate instead, but I didn't have thick enough plate and tacking nuts on was quicker.

E.
Someone was listening, on the later Axminster model of the this saw, the TS200-2/250-2 the manufacturer modified the fixing to incorporate Eric's excellent idea and replaced the nuts with a tapped steel plate, unfortunately these are not shown in the manual diagrams so do not have a part number to enable ordering as a retro fit, but they are shown on Page 28 fig 98: http://www.axminster.co.uk/media/downlo ... manual.pdf I am sure that Axminster being the helpful people they are would order in these if asked.

Mike
 

rafezetter

Troll Hunter
Joined
11 Jun 2013
Messages
2,713
Reaction score
12
Location
Bristol
Just in case any future KITY 419 owner sees this thread (no idea how I didn't at the time it was started) I thought I'd just say I was the very (very) lucky recipient of the KITY 419 previously owned and modded by Erik and I can say all of his ministrations were definitely worth the effort as it's now much simpler to adjust the blade to be perfectly parallel with the mitre slot, having done it not long ago.

no ZCI as yet - so I went with 6mm mdf false top for the few times I need that function.
 

DTB1985

Established Member
Joined
12 Aug 2016
Messages
26
Reaction score
0
Location
Leeds, United Kingdom
Hello to a fellow 419 owner.

New to having one myself and also looked for a manual. After searching the depths of the internet I came across this website which has it but it's in a bit of an odd format:

http://calameo-download.tiny-tools.com/pages.php?doc_id=001835483893342543447

I've actually downloading it all and turned it into a pdf. Not sure if theres a facility on the forum to send it (it's around 16MB) and never used the PM function. Might be able to send you a dropbox link?

Give me a shout if you think that'd be useful.

Regards,

DTB.
 

Steve Maskery

Established Member
Joined
26 Apr 2004
Messages
11,756
Reaction score
89
Location
Kirkby-in-Ashfield
marcros":2618hnoq said:
if you wanted a present idea, the workshop essentials dvd on table saw use could be a good idea.
Thank you Marcros, and Giff, too.

Incidentally, the Kity saw that I use to show sliding table setup is in fact Eric's actual saw, as, as you say, it's virtually identical to the Axi TS200 and the other clones.
 

Latest posts

Top