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Jewellery Cabinet

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Anonymous

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I have just finished a jewellery cabinet which is my own design, but inspired by a silver cabinet pictured in FWW #168, p. 83. The picture is here:

http://f2.pg.photos.yahoo.com/ph/dldund ... m=2802.jpg

The leg mortises, which are at 45 degrees to the faces of the legs, were cut on my morticing jig, using a V-shaped cradle to hold the leg. Floating tenons were glued and screwed into dadoes cut in the inner faces of the apron rails. The joints were reinforced by glue blocks, glued with epoxy and screwed to the aprons.

Rockerau
 

Chris Knight

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Rockerau,
That is a lovely looking cabinet - sort of baroque Krenovian. I reckon if your wide can fill that wither her jewllery, then you must have bought lots of tools in the past - or still have lots to buy!

I have trouble visualising your description of the attachment of the floating tenos to the apron rails. When you say they are in dadoes cut in the inner faces of the rails, do you in fact mean the 45 degree angled ends of the rails?
 
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Anonymous

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Rockerau

Splendid work.

Waterhead

I hope Rockerau's wife doesn't see your post or she'll be after you :lol:

Roy
 
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Anonymous

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Rockerau

That is fantastic work. I clearly remember the piece that inspired you and I must say yours easily equals it.

Cheers

Tony
 
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Anonymous

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Chris,

The inside long faces of the rails were dadoed with 9.5 mm x 50 mm dadoes for their full length. The mitres were then cut; then 9.5 mm x 50 mm pieces (with ends rounded to fit into the routed leg mortices) were glued into the dadoes and reinforced with screws near their ends. The ends of these pieces projected 25 mm from the mitre faces to fit into the leg mortices. So these pieces formed floating tenons, sort of. The reason for doing this was that the leg mortices were at 45 degrees to the faces of the legs. The mortices would thus have broken out of the outer face of the legs, unless they were set back close to the inner corners of the legs. See this diagram:

http://f2.pg.photos.yahoo.com/ph/dldund ... m=3d45.jpg

If I were making the cabinet again, I might glue a block onto the inside face of the leg to make it thicker, and then set the aprons further in and give them normal centred floating tenons. However the joints I made seem quite satisfactory with these unconventional floating tenons.

Rockerau
 

Chris Knight

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Rockerau,

Got it - thanks. A good way of achieving that look. I suspect I would have ended up doing something unnecessarily complicated like using diagonal stretchers with M/T joints into the backsides of the legs and then fastening the aprons to the legs with biscuits - assembly would actually have to be in the reverse order, biscuiting then the stretchers.
 
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