Issue with RP sabre350

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Pabs

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Hi

Just got this to replace a smaller tabletop one.

I was finding it difficult to level off the table in the front-back axis. The fence was floating off the table at the back and I couldn't get the table even close to being square to the blade
I've found that the lower trunnion sits on a bracket which has little grub screws and these came preset from the factory to try and adjust for a pretty slack tolerance of the frame itself. They're already set >1.8mm but even that's not even close enough and I've not adjusted anything given the manual doesn't mention this.

Just looking for advice I guess as I'm not sure there is an easy fix for this issue and am wondering if this needs raising with RP. Also wondering if anyone else has similar issue.

thanks
20240213_180502.jpg
 
Have you tried removing the table and just cleaning all the parts to ensure there is no debris ? The front to back axis is adjustable on that large trunnion to allow bevel cuts so you are saying it cannot be located at the 90° position, in other words the front of the table needs to be raised further ?

I have the BS400 and have had no issues with the table, my issues were the fence soI I have retrofitted the fence from the later Sabre saw and can also fit the Kreg if needed and the blade guard that makes adjusting the bearings nigh on imposible,
 
Thanks @Spectric
I've basically followed the issue down - table is flat, the fence assembly is parallel, fence is flat,
the image shows the degree of intolerance they tried to adjust for in the factory. The issue is this isn't enough and Short of putting shims in I'm not sure I can rectify the issue further along the mechanism
 
Have you tried removing the table and just cleaning all the parts to ensure there is no debris ? The front to back axis is adjustable on that large trunnion to allow bevel cuts so you are saying it cannot be located at the 90° position, in other words the front of the table needs to be raised further ?

I have the BS400 and have had no issues with the table, my issues were the fence soI I have retrofitted the fence from the later Sabre saw and can also fit the Kreg if needed and the blade guard that makes adjusting the bearings nigh on imposible,
Sorry I mean front to back as one looks at the saw blade face on

I can adjust the direction you're referring to with the set screw stop no issues but the front to back issue is creating problems for cuts where I need accurate stops which are reasonably square such as when making bandsaw boxes or large tenons
 
Taking another look at that image, if that gap is where the adjustment has been made to level the table then your issue is not front to back but side to side as standing in front of the saw the motor is to the right which means it is a fixed setting and not adjustable in use so you may need to shim the trunnion to make it sit level but maybe contact RP for there advice.
 
Taking another look at that image, if that gap is where the adjustment has been made to level the table then your issue is not front to back but side to side as standing in front of the saw the motor is to the right which means it is a fixed setting and not adjustable in use so you may need to shim the trunnion to make it sit level but maybe contact RP for there advice.
Yes that's it.
Apologies yes side to side as you say
I'm just not sure if this should be out that much (and more as they've not managed to adjust enough for it(
 
Have you watched the Snodgrass "bandsaw clinic"?:unsure:

Only messing, just send it back as it's unfit for purpose.
Check the rest of the machine out, like I've mentioned elsewhere, i.e any other forum, whilst yer at it.
Chances are that machine could be all the worst bits put together in China.

Does she run, say a 3/4" blade without flutter, or pulsating.. that is, without any guides touching it, or other things fouling against the blade.
A decent saw should be able to run without cutting, without anything strange.
Nibbling of tires, vibration without blade, play in the wheels i.e bearings tight with a hands on approach, how much variance by tramming wheels, should they be a bit inconsistent
i.e you don't want to see, say 1mm of variance of the wheel faces.
I've documented it all, as you may know, not for this place though.
Gotta give the good guys a chance first.

No point in having to go back with another issue, as the replacement bottom trunnion segment
might not be much better.
Beware, most brands doesn't like folks adjusting the bottom wheel, even if those jacking bolts are about to fall out of the hub, I've seen that somewhere before.
Aluminium guide components, hows the threads, parallel with column guidepost...
Saying all that, still a better recipe than some new kids on the block, provided you get a good one.

Remember the three R's of retail, statutory rights and so on.


This is why it's often better to check out second hand machines what's running without issue.
Lots to check, as it's the luck of the draw.

All the best
Good luck

Tim Shilling
 
Thanks Tim

I'm happy enough with the rest of it, wheels are true, tyres are installed well and sized right, the table is flat, the bottom wheel seems to be set right to keep blade centered, the (right) blade can run without fidgeting or twanging about

am I expecting too much?
 
Right sized blade is the widest blade the machine can comfortably handle,
3/4" the very MAX, (really) on that machine, and I mean thin tuffsaws blade at that,
not m42, perhaps a half inch might be more suitable really.
just not some curve cutter,
in which a saw on the wonk will hide things there.
The wider the blade, the more it will tell ya. (not some huge blade, infact the 3/4" blade is prob too much) definitely so if using a tension gauge for testing blade stretch.

No guides touching, to see, bearing in mind you can't cut things without thrust guide,
i.e an honest test.
Need to check the blade has a good weld,
Highly doubtful the faces of the wheels are true, very few machines out there which have
machined faces, maybe necessary if the design of the carriage is sloppy,
as you cant take a reading regarding the direction in which the non-adjustable upper wheel
is facing, if so.
Tramming the wheels, esp the upper one will tell ya, by keen eye won't see anything.

It's all part of the act, in order for things to wear out prematurely.(with every brand)
though at least the design of the lower wheel is a one piece arrangement, hopefully,
if like some of the other RP saws,
and worth noting a hub present, for adjustments, which some of the new session on the Guinnes poo coloured machines don't have, no chance there to align wheels.


The tramming being, in order to take a reading of that upper wheel, should one wheel be facing the right, and the other wheel facing the left, it would be a good idea to sort,
as you'll be making excuses otherwise, hiding things which might need attention/replacement
parts and a domino effect kinda thing.
Don't touch the lower wheel adjustments, not until the machine is checked, as adjustments there might indeed be a great excuse to void warranty.

Way too much detail I won't be mentioning here. (for good reason)
It's all documented very thoroughly, on many a site, but only since last years discovery,
and not before that.

Expecting too much, with my first reply, that's just the usual things,
Alignment might well be expecting too much, that's up to you to sort on a non fully adjustable
machine, i.e every saw on the market.
There's jobs to be protected regarding that, so depends how fat yer wallet is really.
Somethings are consumable, but on a good example of the worst lemon you might see,
the wheel bearings can wallow out the bores.

Lots of ways to obscure the above, and the manufacturers love a good presenter
who obviously has the magic touch ;)
Much like the rest of the pro's.

I suggest you search for accurate bandsaw wheel alignment articles to find more info.
There's only one thats honest.
Don't trust me obviously, I'm just a bandsaw troll.

All the best
Elvis Parsley
 
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Reference the blade sizes, I think that what the OEM might state as the max size blade a particular machine can take is probably pushing it somewhat.

The BS400 is according to RP capable of taking an inch wide blade, yet I find that even using a 3/4 is pushing it so take what they say with a pinch.
 
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