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thick_mike

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This is basically the electrolysis of water converting H2O to H2 and O2. The process requires DC electric current and water.

there are a few problems with using this process to power a car, firstly it requires electricity to produce the fuel, secondly the gas takes a long time to produce (especially with simple low surface area electrodes like those shown in the first video), thirdly the electrodes will react with the oxygen being produced needing frequent replacement and fourthly you will have to store an extremely explosive mixture of gases in the boot of your car. I once managed to blow a clock off the wall in my lab from a distance of 10 metres with a balloon containing 2litres of a hydrogen/oxygen mix. I'd hate to see what would happen with a tank containing 100 litres of compressed gas.
 

Sportique

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In the 60's a colleague of mine was developing a water/petrol mixture for the internal combustion engine. :shock:

He was a machinist, and had fabricated a replacement "carburettor" which enabled him to finely control the water/petrol mix from the driving seat. He had it running on a "frogeye" Austin Sprite at the time. It would start on straight petrol, then he would gradually increase the water content to well over 50% (from memory) apparently without loss in power. I recall him regularly dismantling the engine to check wear etc. and found no surprises.

Unfortunately he passed away before being able to capitalise on his invention.

I know nothing about the detailed workings - just an interested observer at the time.

(By the way John he lived just down the road from you in Devon, we were working at Exeter airport at the time)

Dave
 

JMcK

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Sportique":3cw3dvwv said:
In the 60's a colleague of mine was developing a water/petrol mixture for the internal combustion engine. :shock:

He was a machinist, and had fabricated a replacement "carburettor" which enabled him to finely control the water/petrol mix from the driving seat. He had it running on a "frogeye" Austin Sprite at the time. It would start on straight petrol, then he would gradually increase the water content to well over 50% (from memory) apparently without loss in power. I recall him regularly dismantling the engine to check wear etc. and found no surprises.

Unfortunately he passed away before being able to capitalise on his invention.

I know nothing about the detailed workings - just an interested observer at the time.

(By the way John he lived just down the road from you in Devon, we were working at Exeter airport at the time)

Dave
I don't think it was his invention. Water or steam injection was being tried pre-war. It was also used in WWII in some fighter engines.

If you Google "Water injection in combustion engines" you will get a number of interesting hits.

I believe it is an extension of the observable phenomenon that cars tend to run more smoothly when the atmosphere is wet. May be something to do with the resulting density of the air/fuel mix.
 

dickm

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Some time in the 50s, there was an article in Practical Motorist about what they called water injection; it was actually not injection, but a second carburettor before the main one that fed additional water into the intake air. No secret about how it worked - the expansion of the mist of water doplets into steam when the mixture ignited added considerably to the expansion of the air-fuel mixture, and hence to the power obtained. But I don't think the mixture was anything like 50% water, as that might even prevent ignition. Would guess 5% at most.

Coincidentally, it was a wet misty day here on Friday and I got a definite impression that the car was pulling slightly better than usual. Used to notice this quite a lot on my ancient petrol Volvo, but hadn't spotted it on a modern diesel before.
 

Jonzjob

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I do know that if you sqirt water into a jet engine it produces a lot more power. Called water injection, quell surprise!!

Demineralised water of course.. It was used on the Bristol Proteus engines on the Britannia and it really produced short term increase in power for high altitude, high temp takeoffs for places like Embakasi Airport, Niarobi when Smith declaired unilateral independance for Rhodesia in the 60s and we, the R.A.F. had 5 Britannias based there for about 18 months and running oil into Zambia.
 

devonwoody

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Do you also remember the RedeX gadget in motor cars, a friend of mine had a Triumph (spitfire?) and he used to push a button whilst driving that put a dose of the stuff into the system. The cars behind didnt seem to like it :D
 
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