Quantcast
  • We invite you to join UKWorkshop.
    Members can turn off viewing Ads!

If you had to choose ?

UKworkshop.co.uk

Help Support UKworkshop.co.uk:

thecoder

Established Member
Joined
24 Apr 2011
Messages
481
Reaction score
0
Location
Pontefract
Which is the most versatile tool for the hobbyist/pro woodworker,the table saw or the band saw..I am looking to buy one or the other but can only afford one..so if you had to do without one or the other which would it be ?
 

condeesteso

Established Member
Joined
10 Mar 2011
Messages
1,923
Reaction score
0
Location
Sevenoaks, Kent
Band saw for me, by a mile. But it depends on a few things. Bandsaw is very space efficient (a real table saw is not), and capable of precise work if well set-up with a good blade. Big production guys swear by table saws even for ripping - but we are talking big, 12" plus, massive sliding carriage for sheet work etc. I do use a table saw (Scheppach 2500ci) mainly for cross-cutting... but if one had to go I'd keep the bandsaw every time. And may I (yet again) recommend trying a 'meat & fish' blade for precision work. You can get one for about £12, and they cut a v thin kerf, stay sharp surprisingly long. I cut tenon shoulders and even veneers with one (sub 1mm thick, up to about 8" depth of cut, on a BS500).
 

thecoder

Established Member
Joined
24 Apr 2011
Messages
481
Reaction score
0
Location
Pontefract
condeesteso":nk6ez8iv said:
Band saw for me, by a mile. But it depends on a few things. Bandsaw is very space efficient (a real table saw is not), and capable of precise work if well set-up with a good blade. Big production guys swear by table saws even for ripping - but we are talking big, 12" plus, massive sliding carriage for sheet work etc. I do use a table saw (Scheppach 2500ci) mainly for cross-cutting... but if one had to go I'd keep the bandsaw every time. And may I (yet again) recommend trying a 'meat & fish' blade for precision work. You can get one for about £12, and they cut a v thin kerf, stay sharp surprisingly long. I cut tenon shoulders and even veneers with one (sub 1mm thick, up to about 8" depth of cut, on a BS500).
Hi Douglas thanks for the feedback,and I see what your saying about the benefits of space saving with the bandsaw. the odd times I have had to cut sheets (BIG) I have tended to use my hand circular saw the small bandsaw that I was given has to be honest done me proud on a few occasions but its only tiny in comparison to the bigger ones. I love its versatility and I guess thats what has me asking the question.

However I have just made a sled for my cronky old nutool held together with gaffa tape table saw and the mitres are great :D . I only use this for cross cuts and now mitres :lol: As its seen better days..

Anyone else want to add anything please do :D
 

thecoder

Established Member
Joined
24 Apr 2011
Messages
481
Reaction score
0
Location
Pontefract
jimi43":3lzoj38t said:
I like Granny Smith's and Seville....but which is the best....

:mrgreen:

FIGHT!!! :mrgreen:

Jim
:D I can see where your coming from Jim but im just hoping to get some benefit of peoples experience of having bought/used both and would with hindsight have chosen only one,given the experience.
 

jimi43

Established Member
Joined
12 Mar 2009
Messages
6,921
Reaction score
1
Location
Kent - the Garden of England
thecoder":ig3y3rmq said:
jimi43":ig3y3rmq said:
I like Granny Smith's and Seville....but which is the best....

:mrgreen:

FIGHT!!! :mrgreen:

Jim
:D I can see where your coming from Jim but im just hoping to get some benefit of peoples experience of having bought/used both and would with hindsight have chosen only one,given the experience.
A good bandsaw then....but it depends entirely what you do for a living/hobby.

If you constantly cut large panels or require stock to be straight planks or crosscut then I would say a tablesaw but for general work, resawing, trimming and other clever stuff...a bandsaw.

Jim

Jim
 

RogerP

Established Member
Joined
7 Jan 2011
Messages
3,785
Reaction score
2
Location
Gloucester
I was going to jump in and say bandsaw but, although it's undeniably more versatile than a table saw, I actually find myself using the TS more often for the type of stuff I do. The TS is potentially more accurate and can leave a better cut finish. Apart from being able to cut curves the BS can of course re-saw stuff far, far too large for a TS ... and that's what I mainly use mine for.
 

thecoder

Established Member
Joined
24 Apr 2011
Messages
481
Reaction score
0
Location
Pontefract
jimi43":mkx0t35u said:
thecoder":mkx0t35u said:
jimi43":mkx0t35u said:
I like Granny Smith's and Seville....but which is the best....

:mrgreen:

FIGHT!!! :mrgreen:

Jim
:D I can see where your coming from Jim but im just hoping to get some benefit of peoples experience of having bought/used both and would with hindsight have chosen only one,given the experience.
A good bandsaw then....but it depends entirely what you do for a living/hobby.

If you constantly cut large panels or require stock to be straight planks or crosscut then I would say a tablesaw but for general work, resawing, trimming and other clever stuff...a bandsaw.

Jim

Jim
Im just what I think is known as an enthusiatic amature Jim :lol:

Given your thoughts above I guess I fall into the bandsaw fold :D
 

Steve Maskery

Established Member
Joined
26 Apr 2004
Messages
11,799
Reaction score
138
Location
Kirkby-in-Ashfield
I think a TS is far better for straight cuts than a BS.
But my BS will cut thicker stock than my TS.
My BS cuts curves very nicely, but then so does my Bosch jigsaw.
The BS is lousy for sheet materials, but then my TS isn't that much better, because of the space requirements (rather then the machine itself.

The bottom line - I wouldn't want to be without either, but I could manage with my bandsaw and circular saw and track. But it would have to be a good BS.

S
 

woodbloke

Established Member
Joined
13 Apr 2006
Messages
11,770
Reaction score
0
Location
Salisbury, UK
Steve Maskery":2bgzrb91 said:
I think a TS is far better for straight cuts than a BS.
But my BS will cut thicker stock than my TS.
My BS cuts curves very nicely, but then so does my Bosch jigsaw.
The BS is lousy for sheet materials, but then my TS isn't that much better, because of the space requirements (rather then the machine itself.

The bottom line - I wouldn't want to be without either, but I could manage with my bandsaw and circular saw and track. But it would have to be a good BS.

S
+1...more or less, I wouldn't be without either, both have their uses and I now have a good table saw and two good bandsaws :mrgreen: (one for nipping off small stuff and curves and a bigger Startrite for veneers and converting thick stock) - Rob
 

thecoder

Established Member
Joined
24 Apr 2011
Messages
481
Reaction score
0
Location
Pontefract
Steve Maskery":383ow15m said:
I think a TS is far better for straight cuts than a BS.
But my BS will cut thicker stock than my TS.
My BS cuts curves very nicely, but then so does my Bosch jigsaw.
The BS is lousy for sheet materials, but then my TS isn't that much better, because of the space requirements (rather then the machine itself.

The bottom line - I wouldn't want to be without either, but I could manage with my bandsaw and circular saw and track. But it would have to be a good BS.

S
mmmm best of both worlds I guess would be good but only so much cash to go round , I also have some very good dvds coming for xmas re the bandsaw. :wink: :D
 

thecoder

Established Member
Joined
24 Apr 2011
Messages
481
Reaction score
0
Location
Pontefract
woodbloke":3dse8ox7 said:
Steve Maskery":3dse8ox7 said:
I think a TS is far better for straight cuts than a BS.
But my BS will cut thicker stock than my TS.
My BS cuts curves very nicely, but then so does my Bosch jigsaw.
The BS is lousy for sheet materials, but then my TS isn't that much better, because of the space requirements (rather then the machine itself.

The bottom line - I wouldn't want to be without either, but I could manage with my bandsaw and circular saw and track. But it would have to be a good BS.

S
+1...more or less, I wouldn't be without either, both have their uses and I now have a good table saw and two good bandsaws :mrgreen: (one for nipping off small stuff and curves and a bigger Startrite for veneers and converting thick stock) - Rob

I am jealous :lol: :lol:
 

Steve Maskery

Established Member
Joined
26 Apr 2004
Messages
11,799
Reaction score
138
Location
Kirkby-in-Ashfield
thecoder":kzax73gh said:
mmmm best of both worlds I guess would be good but only so much cash to go round , I also have some very good dvds coming for xmas re the bandsaw. :wink: :D
Then your decision is made for you! :)
And Thanks.
S
 

thecoder

Established Member
Joined
24 Apr 2011
Messages
481
Reaction score
0
Location
Pontefract
Steve Maskery":2x8fvzai said:
thecoder":2x8fvzai said:
mmmm best of both worlds I guess would be good but only so much cash to go round , I also have some very good dvds coming for xmas re the bandsaw. :wink: :D
Then your decision is made for you! :)
And Thanks.
S

Im in 2 minds really about the second hand versus new thing in so much as I realise that 1500 doesn't get me a a lot of, in the new sector but im nervous of spending on second hand without warrantys etc...What makes would you reccomend if any....

Looks like me in the workshop after xmas lunch with a DVD while someone does the washing up :wink:
 

Steve Maskery

Established Member
Joined
26 Apr 2004
Messages
11,799
Reaction score
138
Location
Kirkby-in-Ashfield
But if you buy good brands second hand, and you know what you are looking at, then it's not such a big risk.
I bought most of my machines new, but I was privileged to have a reasonable-money-no-object position at the time. Now it's very different and I wear an extra sweater rather than put the heating on. If I were kitting out my workshop today I would buy SH without hesitation. But I'm pretty sure I could suss out a machine quite successfully, because I know what I'm looking at. That was not the case 20 years ago when I was setting up.
If it's any consolation, ww machine are pretty basic, simple, primitive machines. They consist of big lumps of cast iron, bearings, electrical switchgear, motors and mechanical arrangements for guiding blades and workpieces, whilst keeping fingers away.
Once you understand these issues, it's a much safer game, as you can assess what is fixable and what isn't.
I realise you have your BS DVDs one the way, and I'm grateful for you custom, but if you really are in a quandary, why not do the same sort of self-education with the TS before you spend you hard-earned cash? You could always sell the research materials second-hand when you are done! :) (Although I'd much prefer you to keep them for future reference).
Bottom line - I bought new but now would buy second-hand.

S
 

RogerP

Established Member
Joined
7 Jan 2011
Messages
3,785
Reaction score
2
Location
Gloucester
thecoder":30rmxr3q said:
Im in 2 minds really about the second hand versus new thing in so much as I realise that 1500 doesn't get me a a lot of, in the new sector but im nervous of spending on second hand without warrantys etc...What makes would you reccomend if any....
Looks like me in the workshop after xmas lunch with a DVD while someone does the washing up :wink:
Have a look at Axminster, Charnwood and SIP offerings and I'm sure you'll find that £1500 is plenty for both a TS and BS.

Of course you could get much better old cast iron stuff if you buy second-hand and don't mind spending time/money doing them up. Not the route I'd take.
 

thecoder

Established Member
Joined
24 Apr 2011
Messages
481
Reaction score
0
Location
Pontefract
Steve Maskery":2gwudfou said:
But if you buy good brands second hand, and you know what you are looking at, then it's not such a big risk.
I bought most of my machines new, but I was privileged to have a reasonable-money-no-object position at the time. Now it's very different and I wear an extra sweater rather than put the heating on. If I were kitting out my workshop today I would buy SH without hesitation. But I'm pretty sure I could suss out a machine quite successfully, because I know what I'm looking at. That was not the case 20 years ago when I was setting up.
If it's any consolation, ww machine are pretty basic, simple, primitive machines. They consist of big lumps of cast iron, bearing, electrical switchgear, motors and mechanical arrangements for guiding blades and workpieces, whilst keeping fingers away.
Once you understand these issues, it's a much safer game, as you can assess what is fixable and what isn't.
I realise you have your BS DVDs one the way, and I'm grateful for you custom, but if you really are in a quandary, why not do the same sort of self-education with the TS before you spend you hard-earned cash. You could always sell the research materials second-hand when you are done! :) (Although I'd much prefer you to keep them for future reference).
Bottom line - I bought new but now would buy second-hand.

S
Steve Maskery":2gwudfou said:
But if you buy good brands second hand, and you know what you are looking at, then it's not such a big risk.
I bought most of my machines new, but I was privileged to have a reasonable-money-no-object position at the time. Now it's very different and I wear an extra sweater rather than put the heating on. If I were kitting out my workshop today I would buy SH without hesitation. But I'm pretty sure I could suss out a machine quite successfully, because I know what I'm looking at. That was not the case 20 years ago when I was setting up.
If it's any consolation, ww machine are pretty basic, simple, primitive machines. They consist of big lumps of cast iron, bearing, electrical switchgear, motors and mechanical arrangements for guiding blades and workpieces, whilst keeping fingers away.
Once you understand these issues, it's a much safer game, as you can assess what is fixable and what isn't.
I realise you have your BS DVDs one the way, and I'm grateful for you custom, but if you really are in a quandary, why not do the same sort of self-education with the TS before you spend you hard-earned cash. You could always sell the research materials second-hand when you are done! :) (Although I'd much prefer you to keep them for future reference).
Bottom line - I bought new but now would buy second-hand.

S
Thanks for that Steve I guess its down to confidence in buying and knowing what your looking at. I can identify with all of the above to be honest,many years ago when I became involved with Computers I was in the same place,after many years working in the "field" I can take one apart and put it back with my eyes closed and can smell a bad deal at 100 yards :D .

Im not just saying this but my intention is to get the full DVD set, I have pointed my daughters in the website and told them any of those DVD's would be nice in order of preferance the BS one. So im kind of in limbo to see what turns up on the 25th.

cheers

Dave
 

thecoder

Established Member
Joined
24 Apr 2011
Messages
481
Reaction score
0
Location
Pontefract
RogerP":22szg8x3 said:
thecoder":22szg8x3 said:
Im in 2 minds really about the second hand versus new thing in so much as I realise that 1500 doesn't get me a a lot of, in the new sector but im nervous of spending on second hand without warrantys etc...What makes would you reccomend if any....
Looks like me in the workshop after xmas lunch with a DVD while someone does the washing up :wink:
Have a look at Axminster, Charnwood and SIP offerings and I'm sure you'll find that £1500 is plenty for both a TS and BS.

Of course you could get much better old cast iron stuff if you buy second-hand and don't mind spending time/money doing them up. Not the route I'd take.
Thanks Roger will take a look , I work pretty long hours so any spare time ihave I like to divide between my hobby and SWMBO tasks roughly 80-20 in that order :lol: So the less time I spend repairing things the better I guess.

Dave
 
Top