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How to join the corners? Quick advice please

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Anonymous

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Hi all

Typically I have been distracted from my current project with an inspired idea for a further project.

I am unsure how to join some pieces at a corner though.

Basically I have three 1"x1" pieces (2 horizontal and one vertical) coming together at 90 degrees to each other at the corners of a frame and need a joint to hold them all together. I thought a lap joint on two horrizontal members and a mortice + tenon on vertical?

Is there an easier/better way?

As always, screws/nails/dowel are not an option :)

Cheers

Tony
 
A

Anonymous

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Mortices on the verticle piece and tenons on the horizontal? Or am I missing something?

Joe
 

SimonA

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I think Tony means that he would lap joint the two horizontals togeather and then make the mortice cut through both and the tenon on the vertical would hold all three tightly togeather. This method will make a lot of visable joint lines around the corner..........if your feelling really brave you could try one of those a mitred mortice and tenons. There was a guy in one of the last FWW mags showing how to do them and he had a simple way of doing them. This method leaves a nice clean mitred finish.

I could have a hunt around for the mag if your interested?

SimonA
 

Chris Knight

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Tony,

There is a classic three way miter that involves hidden mortise/tenons which is what Simon is referring to I think. It is seen on Chinese and Japanese furniture quite a lot. It is I think, difficult to do well (never done it myself, it just looks hard. I too have seen fairly recently an article on a simplified form of this joint involving loose tenons - I will have a look for it - probably FWW or something.

How important is strength versus looks?
 

Philly

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Yes, there was an article on cutting this joint using only the table saw in the issue (I think) of "Fine Woodworking". Three way mitres-scared me, two way is enough! :lol:
cheers,
Philly :D
 
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Anonymous

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SimonA":two0ufy4 said:
I think Tony means that he would lap joint the two horizontals together and then make the mortice cut through both and the tenon on the vertical would hold all three tightly togeather. This method will make a lot of visable joint lines around the corner..........if your feelling really brave you could try one of those a mitred mortice and tenons. There was a guy in one of the last FWW mags showing how to do them and he had a simple way of doing them. This method leaves a nice clean mitred finish.

I could have a hunt around for the mag if your interested?

SimonA
Ta Simon. Now that you mention it I remember seeing that article. Looked a little complex to me.

Your description of my intention is correct. I am a little worried about loss of strength though

Chris

Strength matters but the chinese joint would be overkill on this project and I want to complete itquickly and get back to the main job

I bought a Trend pocket screw jig the other day. I still don't know why as I hate using screws in furniture :oops:

It was marked down to 60% of normal price to clear and I smelt a bargain (even though I hadn't intended to buy one). As speed is important I may use this - despite my aversion to screws and nail :cry:

Maybe lap the top two pieces and pocket screw the vertical form two faces?

Cheers

Tony
 

SimonA

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I have to say that I think the mortice would be stronger than the pocket screw. and it would lock the two lapped joints togeather. I'd stick with this depending on how difficult that article makes the three way mitre joint to be.

SimonA
 

Gary H

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Still trying to get the 'woodshack' watertight in
For speed, I think the lap and mortice would possibly be quickest. Or lap the horizontals, then a dowel to go through these into the top of the vertical? Bit amateurish maybe compared to a mortice though :oops:

Gary

EDIT: Sorry, just read your post properly and noticed 'dowels' not an option. M&T it is then :oops: :oops:
 

Chris Knight

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Tony,

You don't say in which direction the forces are applied. It could be that a table/apron joint would do. In that case put a couple of dovetail (sockets) in the vertical piece and dovetail tails on the two side pieces. If you let in one side piece first, you can cut partway into that one's tail for the second side pieces tail if need be and as long as you dont remove too much wood.
 
A

Anonymous

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Thanks Chris. Nice idea and one I hadn't considered. I guess the Rat would be useful for this but I had to pospone the purchase for fiscal reasons. Unexpected expenditure ate the spare money :(
 

Chris Knight

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Tony,

These joints are actually dead easy to cut by hand, even if you are not a D/T expert. I have a rat but I cut such joints by hand.
 

desmoengine

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hi
you were after a quick to produce corner joint , mitre was mentioned but how about a biscuited mitre in esence forming a loose tennoned reinforced mitre
just a thought- quick and simple

dave w
 
A

Anonymous

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Tony,
You needn't spend 400 pounds on a rat; you can build my precision joinery jig for about 50. Message me for a free copy of my article on it. Building the jig is about a day's work.

Rockerau
 
A

Anonymous

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Chris

I had a go at what I think you meant this afternoon. Is this what you had in mind?

Great fun to make but took a while :wink:

Note the 'not quite right' first effort in the picture:(



Cheers

Tony
 

Philly

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Tony,
What chisel is that in the picture- a Crown?
I bought a set that looked like yours-rosewood handles, polished blades. Nice chisels, but the polishing process had rounded all the edges over a bit :cry: Didn't notice till I had put them to use a fair bit.
Philly :D
 
A

Anonymous

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Correct Philly. I have two crown chisels and this is the 1/2" paring. I really like 'em both loads and do not find the polishing a problem as I flattended the front 10mm-or-so on a water stone when I first got them.

I use 'em loads and get a lot of (sad :oops: ) pleasure from paring the joints

Cheers

Tony
 
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