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how to extract a stuck bit / colette from a router?

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miles_hot

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I have not used the router for a few months and now find that the bit I used is stuck in there. Obviously I can't use oil to release it as the next one will just spin so what can I do?

I have undone the nut which secured the pairing and can now see the colette but can't work out how to release it from the Dewalt router!

Many thanks

Miles
 

Andy RV

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Normally the nut will pull the collet out from its tapered housing releasing it, if the nut is no longer attached to the collet in then you'll need to pull on the cutter/ collet to force it up out of the taper, can you get it with some pilers? It shouldn't need to move much before it releases.
 

devonwoody

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Dont attempt to pull the router bit with your fingers, the bit will win and you will get a nasty cut. :wink:
 

JakeS

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I had this problem on a second-hand router a little while ago; I don't know if you'll be so lucky, but in my case there was a nice hole through the side to lock the shaft while removing/tightening the collet nut, the bottom of the bit shank was just near the top of that hole and I could insert an allen key, the rotation of which forced the bit upwards on the corner of the allen key enough to free it.

Which I realise is probably not so useful to you, but this might be: I used oil then, and it made no difference to the future operation of the router with other bits, but it may have helped get the stuck bit out. If a bit of oil between the collet and bit is going to prevent the proper operation of your router, then you're not tightening the collet nut nearly enough. I seem to recall router bits I've bought in the past coming greased to protect them from the elements!

Another thing you might try if all else fails, or if you have the leeway: tap the end of the bit with a hammer, as if it were a nail you were tapping into the router. Often stuck things like this just need to be knocked out of the position they're currently in, and once they're moved - in any direction - they'll move much more freely and could probably be removed by fingers. Obviously if the bit has cutting blades on the end you may want to put a bit of scrap wood over the top and tap that with the hammer instead to avoid damaging the bit.
 

Oryxdesign

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Remember back to the school canteen, you could get an orange pip and squeeze it between your fingers and it would pop out at great speed and a carefully aimed one could give great amusement. Well it is a good lesson to use here, but you do need to be careful or you can do some damage. If you put one hammer on one side of the collet carrier and tap the side opposite with another it should pop out, be careful not to damage the thread and don't hit it too hard. (hammer)
 

9fingers

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As has been said, DW collets are self extracting but if the nut has either not been fitted properly or has somehow been detached from the collet, then remove the nut fully and using a piece of scrap wood, knock the bit from the side to dislodge it.
There is no harm in having a slight oily film on collets and cutter shanks. Free movement will allow more effective gripping with less effort and potential strain one the spindle lock and it will reduce the risk of any rust forming which may be the underlying problem in this case.

Once freed off, investigate how the collet and nut became detached so that this cannot happen again.

hth

Bob
 

monkeybiter

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I have success with this problem as follows; grip the shaft of the bit with a pair of pump pliers [good leverage advantage, thin mole grip would do] with your left hand with the jaws of the pliers as close as possible to the face of the collet nut. Then with a spanner unscrew the nut, this will bear against the plier jaws and hopefully force the bit from the router without damaging the cutting edges of the bit and without imparting any forces on the router spindle.
It probably took me a couple of attempts to apply enough force with the pliers to resist the sideways force of the collet but in the end it popped it out with no fuss. HTH
 

miles_hot

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Well that was uncomfortable! I followed most / all of the suggestions above:
1) Spray of WD40
2) Tap with hammer / wood in all the ways suggested
3) Fasten mole grips and attempt to use the nut

All failed. :( :shock:

Eventually use the mole grips on their very strongest setting to hold the bit (luckily a straight cutter) and the a pry bar :shock: to force the bit out of the collet.

I couldn't feel any burrs or other reason for this level of hold, no corrosion so I have no real lessons to be learnt as to how to avoid this same issue in the future :(

As for the trapping collect nut I don't know what you mean by that Bob - can you educate me further?

Oh well, mission achieved even if it may have cost me a bit - now on with the main show - routing a channel in a finished epoxy surface! :? Not that I' super nervous of this or anything!

Any suggestions on how to avoid this in future gratefully received.

Miles
 

9fingers

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Miles,
Somewhere along the line I could have sworn you had said your router was a dewalt one. I now find that you did not say anything of the kind so your collet and nuts may indeed be separate and my comment would be incorrect in that case - apologies.

As for avoid that problem again, difficult as we do not know the cause. First thought would be to remove cutters at the end of the job and clean the collet and bore of the shaft. Not that I or many other would do that in practice.
Don't store the router or bits where even the slightest film of rust could occur.
Keep some PlusGas in stock. It is a proper penetrating fluid rather than WD40 which is a water displacer - which it does very well and everything else that is claimed for it - badly.

Bob

Bob
 

miles_hot

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No Bob you're right it is a dewalt however the nut comes off the end of the thread which is attached to the motor (the bit with the hole in which the spindle lock engages with). This leaves the collet to come out etc.

I will endeavour to remove the bits at the end of each job (though having said that I realise that I have just locked the garage up with the bit in place! :(

Will get hold of some plusgas stuff

Miles
 

Giff

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Try a bit of heat....A BIT....heat gun should help. Copperslip stops it seizing as well.. giff
 

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