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GEPPETTO

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Hi All,

Only to know if I sharpening and honing correctly my plane blade :shock: , how much time you have elapse between either an other honing operation in a hand-planning work?
I know it depends on type of wood used, and the thickness planed. However, how much is the time??


Thanks
 

Philly

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Difficult to say-whenever you feel that the plane is cutting 100%. If the surface is tearing out or it feels hard work then that normally is the time to give the iron a quick sharpen.
Hope this helps
Philly :D
 

GEPPETTO

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Hi Philly,

thanks. But for instance for to explain better my question, Yesterday I planned a board of oak to achieve the exhaust fan kitchen smoke frame. Well, I have had to hone the blade after, only, half hour of nostop work. Is it possible that one have to hone the blade two times in one hour??
 

Chris Knight

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Gepetto,

It's perfectly possible to have to touch up the blade at half hourly intervals - it can be needed even more frequently, depending what you are planing.

On the other hand, it may well be overkill for what you are doing. I often just give a blade a quick strop on a piece of leather and that is enough to continue working.

Equally I have some blades that haven't been near a stone or a strop for weeks and they still cut fine.

On the whole for a normal piece of oak, a half seems too soon for your blade to need attention, I would have thought an hour or two would be more like it.
 

GEPPETTO

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Hi waterhead37,

mmhhh, perhaps if I re-think on it, I honed after one hour after the first time. Therefore it would be good :? .
You say you strop often: do you disassemble the blade from the cap or you strop the bevel with the cap attached?? (mmhh stupid question :roll: )
 

Chris Knight

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Geppetto,

I take the cap iron off generally. I have some planes with two piece cap irons where it is not necessary to unscrew the iron, the part nearest the blade is loose (like the Clifton cap irons) and this give enough clearance to sharpen or strop the blade.

I would emphasise I don't like having to sharpen or strop very often. If you find your edge disappearing too quickly, it may be necessary to rethink your bevel angles. If you examine the edge with a magnifying glass, you may be able to see the nature of the problem. If a fine edge breaks, it looks different from one that has simply worn.

A broken edge indicates you need less acute bevel angles, a worn edge means resharpen/strop as needed.
 

Midnight

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Geppetto..

as you said, it depends on the type of wood, but the grade of steel that the blade's made from will make a difference too. I was lucky to get my stock Stanley blades to last a half hour working oak.. my L-N's however will last a full day if I'm carefull, longer on some other species, shorter on others... Bottom line is it really doesn't matter provided you learn to give the blade a wee touch up when it tells you it's getting tired...
 

GEPPETTO

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Hi,

Midnight, waterhead37 I wish to thank you. How you Know I am a novice, and therefore I didn't know if it was right honing of the blade so often. Now I am more calm.

.. I will try to see what I see with an magnifying glass...

Thanks again.
 
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