Quantcast

How do you turn a positive outline into a negative? UPDATED

UKworkshop.co.uk

Help Support UKworkshop.co.uk:

Mcluma

Established Member
Joined
2 Feb 2005
Messages
1,832
Reaction score
0
Location
Pyrford - Woking
How do you turn a positive outline into a negative?

I have been cutting these hinges with the router following a template. These templates were made by me using the band saw, following a pencil line – the template is good, but not perfect – I am looking for something better

I spoke to Trend the manufacturer of the hinge jig but they do not have anything in there program to actually match a 16 degree corner – it can be done by using a 32mm cutter – well these are not available – so the best option is to have a template

Is there a way by actually using the hinge itself and a router to create from the hinge outline a template?

I can then use the guide bush to ride up against the template and make the hinge cut out.



Untitled by mcluma, on Flickr
 

foxhunter

Established Member
Joined
10 Dec 2011
Messages
337
Reaction score
0
Location
Reigate, Surrey
Would this work?

Make a male template of the hinge leaf (only the curved part) by attaching the hinge to a piece of MDF follow closely the outline with a bandsaw and finish off with a bearing guided cutter. Attach this template to another piece of MDF and using a guide bush and cutter of your choice make a female template. The same guide bush and cutter could then be used to cut the rebate for the hinge.

Brian
 

deserter

Established Member
Joined
5 Nov 2009
Messages
551
Reaction score
0
Location
Shrewsbury, Shropshire
Use the hinge and follow it with a guide bush, making a template which is over sized by the radius of your guide bush less the radius of you cutter. Now follow this template adjusting your guide bush and cutter to get the cutout you require.


~Nil carborundum illegitemi~
 

xy mosian

Established Member
Joined
21 Feb 2009
Messages
2,805
Reaction score
2
Location
West Yorkshire
Personally I'd do just what you did previously. Just take more care, perhaps use a scratch awl to make the original marks and be prepared to finish, after band sawing, by hand. Make it a snug fit. Of course if the hinges vary in size then it's all a waste of time really.

xy
 

mailee

Established Member
Joined
26 Jun 2005
Messages
5,502
Reaction score
0
Location
grimsby Humberside
I use the same system as Deserter to make templates for hinges, although I take the hinge and measure the offset of the guide bush to my cutter and then cut a piece of scrap to this size. I then follow this around the hinge with a fine tipped pencil and cut out to the line. It is pretty accurate and only occasionally needs a little fettling for a perfect fit. HTH :wink:
 

Templatetom

Established Member
Joined
4 Jun 2010
Messages
77
Reaction score
0
Location
Perth Western Australia
Mcluma":1drktorb said:
How do you turn a positive outline into a negative?

I have been cutting these hinges with the router following a template. These templates were made by me using the band saw, following a pencil line – the template is good, but not perfect – I am looking for something better

I spoke to Trend the manufacturer of the hinge jig but they do not have anything in there program to actually match a 16 degree corner – it can be done by using a 32mm cutter – well these are not available – so the best option is to have a template

Is there a way by actually using the hinge itself and a router to create from the hinge outline a template?

I can then use the guide bush to ride up against the template and make the hinge cut out.




You might like to try this method.

Secure your hinge to the template material and select a 16mm Guide with a 4mm cutter and rout the template shape.
Stage 2 With the shape produced select a 30mm Guide with a 10mm cutter to rout the shape where the hinge will fit neatly
Template Tom
Untitled by mcluma, on Flickr
 

Mcluma

Established Member
Joined
2 Feb 2005
Messages
1,832
Reaction score
0
Location
Pyrford - Woking
Templatetom":lsv3m587 said:
Mcluma":lsv3m587 said:
How do you turn a positive outline into a negative?

I have been cutting these hinges with the router following a template. These templates were made by me using the band saw, following a pencil line – the template is good, but not perfect – I am looking for something better

I spoke to Trend the manufacturer of the hinge jig but they do not have anything in there program to actually match a 16 degree corner – it can be done by using a 32mm cutter – well these are not available – so the best option is to have a template

Is there a way by actually using the hinge itself and a router to create from the hinge outline a template?

I can then use the guide bush to ride up against the template and make the hinge cut out.




You might like to try this method.

Secure your hinge to the template material and select a 16mm Guide with a 4mm cutter and rout the template shape.
Stage 2 With the shape produced select a 30mm Guide with a 10mm cutter to rout the shape where the hinge will fit neatly
Template Tom
Untitled by mcluma, on Flickr
thanks for the answer on this one,

I had a member on another forum creating me 3 templates by using a CNC

But its good to know that its actually that simple to create them myself by using different guide bushes and router bits.

So in short, but insing this set-up its possible to create a negative from a positive all the time?
 

Mcluma

Established Member
Joined
2 Feb 2005
Messages
1,832
Reaction score
0
Location
Pyrford - Woking
The world is indeed a small place.

Remember the issue I had in turning a positive outline into a negative to make a jig to cut-out my hinges.

Well Tokyo Stu came to the rescue with his Icarver. Stu offered to cut the jigs and send them over to the UK.

The next evening I send him the drawings, and Stu went straight to work with them and had them in the post that evening.

They arrived yesterday and I have fitted them in my Trend hinge Jig. I have not tried them out, but all measurements look right, so there should not be any problems

Here is the drawing that I send to Stu


Untitled by mcluma, on Flickr

Here the Icarver at work


Untitled by mcluma, on Flickr

One done


Untitled by mcluma, on Flickr

Job completed


Untitled by mcluma, on Flickr

In the mail and arrived here in the UK – very well packed


Untitled by mcluma, on Flickr



Untitled by mcluma, on Flickr



Stu – a big thank you from me to take on this challenge
 

Mcluma

Established Member
Joined
2 Feb 2005
Messages
1,832
Reaction score
0
Location
Pyrford - Woking
A short progress update on hanging the doors

As you all know I got some intercontinental support with this one

To cut the hinges I use a Trend hinge jig, this is a fixed bar with preset positions to cut-out the hinges. The same jig you use on the door as well on the door style. It makes light work of an otherwise tedious measuring job, especially if you are using three hinges on a door.


Untitled by mcluma, on Flickr

The hinge jig is more usable for square edged hinges, not the so much the one I use which have rounded corners. So a solution needed to be sought. Originally I made new jigs with the use of the band saw, but found these not 100% accurate. Just a tad to sloppy

Then Tokyo Stu came to the rescue. He cut me 3 jigs with the use of his Icarver and these are perfect – the turnaround between making contact with Stu and having them in my hand was exceptional.

This time I took the time to fit the new jig inserts properly into the jig. Yes it meant that I had to drill holes in a expensive jig, but if you have to cut 24 doors or 72 cuts on doors and another 72 cuts on door frames, you want something that is sturdy and fit for heavy production – (I have been saying to the wife that this refurb can’t any longer been seen as a DIY project)


DSC_3708 by mcluma, on Flickr

Sofar I have cut 7 doors with the new jig and I’m very happy with the accuracy of the cut – a nice tight fit


DSC_3711 by mcluma, on Flickr

Here a few more doors that have been done


DSC_3710 by mcluma, on Flickr


DSC_3718 by mcluma, on Flickr


DSC_3722 by mcluma, on Flickr
 
Top