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Homemade table saw

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JustBen

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Hi guys,

I have been looking at this site with interest for a while now. Im a joiner of 10 years and wish to kit out my workshop for woodworking.

I have a very limited budget and wish to get the best value I can from it. Difficult, I know.

I want a decent table saw but at this moment cannot afford the saw that I want/need. I am after a cabinet style table saw but can only afford bench table saws.

My questions are..... Has anyone built their own table saw? How difficult was it to build the rise/fall and tilt mechanism and with belt(s)? Would it be better to go for direct drive? Do the table top saws have induction motors on them?

I can build a table saw with a circular saw with no problems but the noise is incredible.

I want to use an induction/brushless motor that normal cabinet saws use.

I could modify a bench top table saw into a cabinet saw but need to start with the right parts (ie right motor, mechanism?

I have searched google and the forum but havent found anything.

Any ideas?

Many thanks in advance for your help.
 

tomatwark

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I would have thought that by the time you have bought all the bits and got it to cut well, you would be better to buy a second hand one, such as a Wadkin AGS which parts are still available for and rebuild it, even if you end up converting it to 240v.

At least that way you will get the bits you need for the rise and fall and tilt.

That said if you want a challenge got for it.

It really depends on what sort of budget you have.

Tom.
 

MickCheese

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I am not sure you will end up with something you will be proud of at a price that is attractive to you.

Have a look here for many DIY machinery projects for ideas.

http://woodgears.ca/tools.html

As a joiner do you have a track saw? If so make a decent support table for it and use that until a decent used table saw appears on eBay.

Mick
 

twothumbs

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There used to be a guy ..Cliff Bower..of somewhere down south (Brighton ?) who designed and made up kits of machinery; tabelsaws, planers, band saws, and possibly more. They worked exceptionally well, but that was many years ago. I have the plans and parts for the saw. Tilt, etc was all there and he could rip through 2" or 3" Oak. Cliff Bower used spindles, threaded rod, and so on. Good stuff when there wasn't much around. He was obviosly an interesting guy. Sadly died about the time I was in contact and his widow was still doing a bit of suppling.

I will look them out and see how they look some 30/ 40 years on.
 

JustBen

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My budget is £100 - £150 for a table saw. I would like a iron/ally topped induction motored saw but unless I get lucky on ebay, its not gonna happen thus asking about building one.



Im happy to build/modify a saw and I have the time to do it. I can build a bigger table for a smaller saw. I can/will build my own accurate fence for the saw. It will run a fine toothed blade.

Can a router, bench grinder motor be used to replace a bench top saw motor. That way, I get the mechanism and a quiet saw.

Eventually I will but a decent one but for now ive got to make/modify one.

Ive seen the woodgears.ca website. He has some very nice diy tools. I do intend on building a slot morticer & 3d pantograph at some point but want to get the shop up and running first.
 

ScouseKev

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I know you have already mentioned about the noise level when using a regular circular saw but with a small budget you are really going to struggle.

What about buying a used Triton workcentre and mounting your own saw.

You could panel the sides of the frame and add some sound proofing.
Ive seen the mark 2 workcentre sell for less than £100 on fleebay, you may even get one with a circular saw included.

I used them for years and they are a good accurate machine for the money.

Hope this helps
 

wobblycogs

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I made my own belt sander 18 months ago, after designing it I priced up the parts and realized it was about the same price as a new one from Axi. I still built anyway for the enjoyment of it.

As for your table saw idea it's certainly possible but I think you'd be much better off getting a cheap second hand model or just mounting a circular saw upside down. With a bit of boxing in an some baffles you could probably greatly reduce the noise coming from the motor of a cheap circular saw.
 

JustBen

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The noise isnt an issue in regards to the neighbours, its just the scream that comes from a circular saw.

I have a spare bench grinder that has a very quiet single phase 1/2hp motor. I know its not the biggest but I will mainly be cutting softwood and 1" thick or smaller.

If I could get a cheap table screamer saw and swap motors, build it into my existing table, then I would have a bigger saw table with a quiet motor and all the mechanisms......??

Getting the blade straight and sorting the fence is no problem.

Is it possible?
 

TheTiddles

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Stretch to a TS-200 then make a cabinet/router table to bulk it up and add outfeed tables etc... that's probably going to be the best you cna get for the money, even a cheap and ugly wadkin is a lot more than that normally, given though, it has a lot more potential

Aidan
 

Benchwayze

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Benji,

I have an old Triton Mk 3 Work-centre.

It has a saw-table, saw-carrier, router table and router carrier, and all the fences, guards and mitre guides. I even have a VHS video on its use. I think I still have the manual for it too, so you can assemble it. All you would need is a circular saw to fit into it (A 9.25" saw maximum. I used an Elu which you might find pre-used. )

If you can collect you are welcome to it.

Yes brush motors are noisy, but if your neighbours aren't bothered, then wear headset-style ear defenders, and you won't notice the noise either.

Once you set up this saw, you will have an accurate, saw that can be used for spot-on cross-cutting and also as a proper table-saw.
You can also use it as an inverted router table, and an overhead router. You will need to make a castored trolley to put it on, because the scrap-merchants nicked the undercarriage. (Which I admit, was one part of the work-centre that wasn't exactly the dogs parts! )

Just PM if you are interested or not.

HTH
John :)
 

doorframe

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Hi Benji. You say you've got the time to do it, so do it. If your workshop is your livelihood then don't waste time building a saw when you should be earning money... BUY ONE!!, but if, like me, you're workshop is your hobby, then use your workshop to build your own tools. The satisfaction you get from using tools you've built yourself is far greater than the hole in your wallet from buying tools that only the pros (or the wealthy) can justify.

A few I've built (there are others, and more in the pipeline) are 2 linishers (24" and 36" approx), a recipricating bobbin sander, a wet wheel / grinding station, and a bench saw rebuild using a 9" angle grinder. Any power tools I've bought have (almost) all been in need of a total rebuild, for which I have made 90% of the parts myself. My favorite rebuild is my little 'turn of the century' R and A lathe. Took ages to do but I grin to myself every time I use it. As long as it's ONLY YOU that's going to use them.... go for it.

HTH

Roy
 

heimlaga

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I have used a home built table saw for many years. The plywood table was not flat and there was no tilt. It was usable but compared to the cast iron monster I have now it was not very good.

In your situation I would try to save up a bit more money and then search for a flat belt driven table saw. Those that were run from an overhead line shaft powered by a water turbine or a steam engine back in the days before small cheap electric motors. Those saws are very rigid and heavily built and the ones I have seen for sale have been rather cheap. Nobody has a line shaft setup theese days so few people want them. Then I would rebuild the saw and maybe repour the bearings and modify it with proper guards and an electric motor. That would make a professional quality cast iron table saw at minimum cost.
 

jimi43

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doorframe":1w1q1oos said:
Hi Benji. You say you've got the time to do it, so do it. If your workshop is your livelihood then don't waste time building a saw when you should be earning money... BUY ONE!!, but if, like me, you're workshop is your hobby, then use your workshop to build your own tools. The satisfaction you get from using tools you've built yourself is far greater than the hole in your wallet from buying tools that only the pros (or the wealthy) can justify.

A few I've built (there are others, and more in the pipeline) are 2 linishers (24" and 36" approx), a recipricating bobbin sander, a wet wheel / grinding station, and a bench saw rebuild using a 9" angle grinder. Any power tools I've bought have (almost) all been in need of a total rebuild, for which I have made 90% of the parts myself. My favorite rebuild is my little 'turn of the century' R and A lathe. Took ages to do but I grin to myself every time I use it. As long as it's ONLY YOU that's going to use them.... go for it.

HTH

Roy
Hi Roy

Do you have any plans/WIP thread on your bobbin sander? I want to make one too but I don't want to invent the wheel...particularly on the uppy-downy mechanism....

And I wouldn't mind seeing the grinding station and lathe too!

Jim
 

Benchwayze

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Agreed Jim.

A bobbin-sander would be nice to have.
Trouble is, in my case, floor-space is running out, so I bought a bobbin from Axy, that fits into my stand-mounted drill. I just move the work up and down. It needs a bit more care to maintain a square surface across the work-piece, but hey... it helps pass the time! :D

Regards
John :)
 

doorframe

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Hey Jim,
The Bobbin sander is built using an old Wolf drill press. It's mounted upside down and the head assembly is rearranged accordingly, uses an old drill and homemade bobbins, and an old induction motor driving through an old oil filled gearbox is linked to the arm to give a rise and fall of about 25mm. It's permanently built into a bench, but will be moved soon as I'm rearranging the whole workshop. When I built it I used bushes rather than bearings (as I had none!!) but when I move it to it's new location I'll be fitting it with bearings so I'll grab some pics.

Used a similar motor gearbox arrangement to drive the wet wheel. I never knew whether to use oil or water in the trough, as I've no idea what the wheel is made from. So far I've used water and that seems fine. Also think it's going the wrong way!!! Also, it does run slightly out of true, but now the lathe is up and running that will be sorted. All the issues will be addressed soon as it's also being moved.

The lathe was just a seized up pile of rust. Spent a lot of time refurbing and adding a drive with an inverter, plus a few mods to get the back drive working. The lead screw was fine but the lead nut was almost totally shot. Had to make a cutting tool by grinding down an old broken tap and and then cut my first ever Acme thread. The new lead nut works a treat. Again, this lathe is also being moved to a new position so I'll get some nice pics then.

As I said, the workshop is my hobby, so it really doesn't matter if these jobs take a long time. All the parts I use are pulled from skips or found in junk bins at bootsales, or ebay for pennies. Keeps me busy and out of SWIMBO's way!!

Roy
 

Benchwayze

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Roy,

Are you using a 'crankshaft' arrangement, or an elliptical cam to make the bobbin 'bob'?

Cheers
John :)
 

jimi43

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Cheers Roy...the descriptions sound fascinating.

I too tend to shy away from anything new from shops...I fail to see why I should feather the nest of companies making huge profits out of basic stuff...most of which is sub-standard and nylon/plastic.

I am of your thinking...modification and adaptation of basic sub-structures that do a particular job...married with other structures to form a complete tool.

Would love to see some pictures of your inventions when you get a chance mate.

Jim
 

doorframe

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Benchwayze":i1nmnvnp said:
Roy, Are you using a 'crankshaft' arrangement, or an elliptical cam to make the bobbin 'bob'? Cheers John :)
At the moment its a crankshaft. Dissadvantage is that there is a slight deadspot at each end of the stroke, where the bobbin 'hangs' at the top and bottom. The elliptical cam would give better control but at the time of building I honestly didn't even consider it. #-o

Food for thought. I feel some modificatios coming on!! Thanks John.
 

Benchwayze

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Glad to be of service Roy.

I just might have taken a stroll into a scrapyard to lay my hands on an old style OHV cam-shaft. Just wondered :D

But as I said earlier, I just use a bobbin in a drill! And I only bought that for one task I had! :mrgreen:

Bester Luck!
 
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