Have any dumb dreams?

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D_W

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This is intended to be a humorous thread, so if you're on something that gives you horrifying dreams, then maybe not the place.


.....

At any rate, I have two - one is persistent - I'm walking somewhere in college my last semester and can't find my paper schedule of courses, and then realize I've been missing a math course for at least weeks, perhaps months, and that I'll be stuck there next semester. College was more than two decades ago. I never had this occur while I was there. In the dreams, I'm always trying to figure out how to eke out a D in the course (I never got a D either), graduate on time, and am concurrently annoyed with what it will do to my weighted grade profile.

The second dream is - Target (the retailer, not sure if that's overseas) , which is wildly successful here, is found to have been cooking books and the stores are closing. I don't know why I'd care as I don't generally go to target aside from it being less than a mile away (so for milk, or to use the pharmacy). The dream makes less sense than that, though - in it, I'm walking through a target store with no people in it an remarking to my wife "I can't believe they all went out of business". I'm supposing while awake that if they actually closed the stores, I probably wouldn't be walking through them remarking that they're closed.

When I wake up from either of these, it takes a second to realize they make no sense. After I'm awake for 5-10 seconds, I think "thank God I'm not in college any longer" or "why dream about target closing? I wouldn't care if they did."


....

The first dream would be far worse if I realized I'd have to come back the next semester and take five pompous art history or philosophy courses.
 

baldkev

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One of my mates described a weird dream he had that involved naked nuns dancing round a washing machine spewing out custard in a field......

Beat that 😆🤣
 

baldkev

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Well we all kinda thought he must have a thing for nuns and the custard was a euthamism for spaff 🤓
They say dreams have a meaning!
 

Cozzer

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Not dumb, as such.....but nasty.

A few years ago I was standing on our local train station's platform, waiting to travel to work.
Cold morning, so most of the people there were well wrapped up - thankfully, as you'll soon read.
The usual number of regulars there, a few "hellos" exchanged, a few "hope the train's not late"...all normal stuff.
What was unusual was the appearance of a lady (originally from Japan as it transpired) with her 4 year-old toddler.....
The station is a bog-standard job - one line south, one north. No waiting room. You're exposed to the elements.
Each platform boasted a painted yellow line, maybe a yard away from the platform edge, along with lettering stating that you should stand, for safety, outside the line when a train was pulling in.
It's a little station, albeit on a main line. Only a few trains stop there. The rest fly through at 70mph. That's a guess. It could easily be more.
I was chatting to Alan, my normal fellow passenger, as a train hurtled through....It wasn't "ours", but folk move about, knowing ours was next in line....

It was a corner-of-the-eye job.
The youngster freed his grip on his mum's hand, and started to run excitedly towards the track. A bit unsteady on his feet, he crossed the yellow line at pace, and was just about to get "hit" by the air being sucked out courtesy of the train. His mum screamed.
Which way he'd have gone, I don't know.
Under the train, or blown back on the platform.
As he passed me, I grabbed the back of his coat collar...or perhaps his hood - I don't know which it was - and yanked him backwards. He ended up on his back, flat on the platform, and crying.
From that moment, I know what the expression "It all happened so fast..." actually means.
The mum, Alan, and a few other witnesses realised how close to a tragedy we'd been....

An hour or so later, I was at work. I felt ill. I was shaking. It really hit me. So much, in fact, that I was sent home for the day.
I've never seen the lady or child since, and since leaving work, I've never caught the train there.

It's had an long-term effect.
Every couple of years since, I have a "bad night".
I wake up with a start, sweating, panting, shaking. It's horrible. I have to get, and stay, up. Cigarettes, coffee. Lights on. I know the dream by now.

It's not the same people. There is a child, and a train.
He/she rushes for the platform edge.
I reach out for the coat/hood.
But I miss....
 

Sandyn

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I wake up with a start, sweating, panting, shaking. It's horrible. I have to get, and stay, up. Cigarettes, coffee. Lights on. I know the dream by now.
What an amazing thing you did. You probably saved that child's life, It's really unfortunate you have been left with this bad dream.
Is it possible you have some kind of PTSD and your mind won't let you escape from the thought of what might have happened if you hadn't saved the child. It would have been beyond horrific to see something like that. If it really troubles you, you should get some help. Someone who can walk you through your thought process and perhaps release you from your nightmare.
 

MichaelChou

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It’s not dumb at all. You’re still making sense of it. Have a look over this from, it will give you an idea of the impact and if you think it’s a good idea, you can make a self referral to your local IAPT service. It’s worth doing. You are asking about it for a very good reason.




Not dumb, as such.....but nasty.

A few years ago I was standing on our local train station's platform, waiting to travel to work.
Cold morning, so most of the people there were well wrapped up - thankfully, as you'll soon read.
The usual number of regulars there, a few "hellos" exchanged, a few "hope the train's not late"...all normal stuff.
What was unusual was the appearance of a lady (originally from Japan as it transpired) with her 4 year-old toddler.....
The station is a bog-standard job - one line south, one north. No waiting room. You're exposed to the elements.
Each platform boasted a painted yellow line, maybe a yard away from the platform edge, along with lettering stating that you should stand, for safety, outside the line when a train was pulling in.
It's a little station, albeit on a main line. Only a few trains stop there. The rest fly through at 70mph. That's a guess. It could easily be more.
I was chatting to Alan, my normal fellow passenger, as a train hurtled through....It wasn't "ours", but folk move about, knowing ours was next in line....

It was a corner-of-the-eye job.
The youngster freed his grip on his mum's hand, and started to run excitedly towards the track. A bit unsteady on his feet, he crossed the yellow line at pace, and was just about to get "hit" by the air being sucked out courtesy of the train. His mum screamed.
Which way he'd have gone, I don't know.
Under the train, or blown back on the platform.
As he passed me, I grabbed the back of his coat collar...or perhaps his hood - I don't know which it was - and yanked him backwards. He ended up on his back, flat on the platform, and crying.
From that moment, I know what the expression "It all happened so fast..." actually means.
The mum, Alan, and a few other witnesses realised how close to a tragedy we'd been....

An hour or so later, I was at work. I felt ill. I was shaking. It really hit me. So much, in fact, that I was sent home for the day.
I've never seen the lady or child since, and since leaving work, I've never caught the train there.

It's had an long-term effect.
Every couple of years since, I have a "bad night".
I wake up with a start, sweating, panting, shaking. It's horrible. I have to get, and stay, up. Cigarettes, coffee. Lights on. I know the dream by now.

It's not the same people. There is a child, and a train.
He/she rushes for the platform edge.
I reach out for the coat/hood.
But I miss....
 

thetyreman

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Not dumb, as such.....but nasty.

A few years ago I was standing on our local train station's platform, waiting to travel to work.
Cold morning, so most of the people there were well wrapped up - thankfully, as you'll soon read.
The usual number of regulars there, a few "hellos" exchanged, a few "hope the train's not late"...all normal stuff.
What was unusual was the appearance of a lady (originally from Japan as it transpired) with her 4 year-old toddler.....
The station is a bog-standard job - one line south, one north. No waiting room. You're exposed to the elements.
Each platform boasted a painted yellow line, maybe a yard away from the platform edge, along with lettering stating that you should stand, for safety, outside the line when a train was pulling in.
It's a little station, albeit on a main line. Only a few trains stop there. The rest fly through at 70mph. That's a guess. It could easily be more.
I was chatting to Alan, my normal fellow passenger, as a train hurtled through....It wasn't "ours", but folk move about, knowing ours was next in line....

It was a corner-of-the-eye job.
The youngster freed his grip on his mum's hand, and started to run excitedly towards the track. A bit unsteady on his feet, he crossed the yellow line at pace, and was just about to get "hit" by the air being sucked out courtesy of the train. His mum screamed.
Which way he'd have gone, I don't know.
Under the train, or blown back on the platform.
As he passed me, I grabbed the back of his coat collar...or perhaps his hood - I don't know which it was - and yanked him backwards. He ended up on his back, flat on the platform, and crying.
From that moment, I know what the expression "It all happened so fast..." actually means.
The mum, Alan, and a few other witnesses realised how close to a tragedy we'd been....

An hour or so later, I was at work. I felt ill. I was shaking. It really hit me. So much, in fact, that I was sent home for the day.
I've never seen the lady or child since, and since leaving work, I've never caught the train there.

It's had an long-term effect.
Every couple of years since, I have a "bad night".
I wake up with a start, sweating, panting, shaking. It's horrible. I have to get, and stay, up. Cigarettes, coffee. Lights on. I know the dream by now.

It's not the same people. There is a child, and a train.
He/she rushes for the platform edge.
I reach out for the coat/hood.
But I miss....

it's likey you have PTSD, it's worth trying to get help for it, but you should be proud of saving the child, I'm sure his mum is grateful for what you did.
 

Footplate2012

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Not dumb, as such.....but nasty.

A few years ago I was standing on our local train station's platform, waiting to travel to work.
Cold morning, so most of the people there were well wrapped up - thankfully, as you'll soon read.
The usual number of regulars there, a few "hellos" exchanged, a few "hope the train's not late"...all normal stuff.
What was unusual was the appearance of a lady (originally from Japan as it transpired) with her 4 year-old toddler.....
The station is a bog-standard job - one line south, one north. No waiting room. You're exposed to the elements.
Each platform boasted a painted yellow line, maybe a yard away from the platform edge, along with lettering stating that you should stand, for safety, outside the line when a train was pulling in.
It's a little station, albeit on a main line. Only a few trains stop there. The rest fly through at 70mph. That's a guess. It could easily be more.
I was chatting to Alan, my normal fellow passenger, as a train hurtled through....It wasn't "ours", but folk move about, knowing ours was next in line....

It was a corner-of-the-eye job.
The youngster freed his grip on his mum's hand, and started to run excitedly towards the track. A bit unsteady on his feet, he crossed the yellow line at pace, and was just about to get "hit" by the air being sucked out courtesy of the train. His mum screamed.
Which way he'd have gone, I don't know.
Under the train, or blown back on the platform.
As he passed me, I grabbed the back of his coat collar...or perhaps his hood - I don't know which it was - and yanked him backwards. He ended up on his back, flat on the platform, and crying.
From that moment, I know what the expression "It all happened so fast..." actually means.
The mum, Alan, and a few other witnesses realised how close to a tragedy we'd been....

An hour or so later, I was at work. I felt ill. I was shaking. It really hit me. So much, in fact, that I was sent home for the day.
I've never seen the lady or child since, and since leaving work, I've never caught the train there.

It's had an long-term effect.
Every couple of years since, I have a "bad night".
I wake up with a start, sweating, panting, shaking. It's horrible. I have to get, and stay, up. Cigarettes, coffee. Lights on. I know the dream by now.

It's not the same people. There is a child, and a train.
He/she rushes for the platform edge.
I reach out for the coat/hood.
But I miss....
I'm a train driver and this is a regular occurrence. Sometimes it's a wandering child. Sometimes it's some knob head messing about. Sometimes it's a bloke who thinks you're supposed to, or are able to, stop like a bus, and jumps off his bench and sprints to the edge with his arm out. Sometimes it's a person stood on the edge staring at the track...
All of these make you start paying attention pretty fast.
I've had a bloke jump off a bridge in front of my train. Luckily I was only just leaving a station and was able to stop, and probably saved his life with the first aid myself and the guard gave him.
I don't dream about any of those things. I dream about the train driving itself off without me and I'm running to catch it. Or I put the brakes on and nothing happens.
You most likely saved that child's life. The bad nights you describe sound like PTSD to me. My honest advice would be to seek help for it.
 

Cozzer

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Morning, all...
PTSD? Perhaps you're right. I'd never considered that.
As regards being "brave", it's not the case, I'm afraid! Purely a reflex action. Anyone who spotted the kiddie veering towards the edge would've done exactly the same. I was just fortunate to get - and keep - a grip on his clothing.
I've just read Footplate2012's account above. Now that's scary. To do it every day, and keep trying to second-guess what that third party's just about to do? That takes some bottle, matey.
 

D_W

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Morning, all...
PTSD? Perhaps you're right. I'd never considered that.
As regards being "brave", it's not the case, I'm afraid! Purely a reflex action. Anyone who spotted the kiddie veering towards the edge would've done exactly the same. I was just fortunate to get - and keep - a grip on his clothing.
I've just read Footplate2012's account above. Now that's scary. To do it every day, and keep trying to second-guess what that third party's just about to do? That takes some bottle, matey.

Not sure what therapy would provide (hopefully not solution by medication), but if the dream is going to visit so often, you may be able to bend it by telling yourself that if you have it, you're going to pull the kid back earlier in the dream and pat him on the head. As if, it's it's going to visit you, invite it instead of dreading it.
 

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