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Garden Shed/Workshop advice!

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Dissolve

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Hello there,

I'm now planning on buying a large outdoor shed/workshop and I need some advice. I have the space for a 10x12 (ish) workshop which has ancient concrete on which I have since shingled for other uses.

I've been looking into something like this:
http://www.gardenbuildingsdirect.co.uk/ ... ifications

But I have a few questions as to how I'd turn it into the kind of workshop I'm after!

Will I need to remove all the shingle and re-concrete the base? If so, Are there any decent tutorials on how to do this well?
Would I need to raise the shed/workshop up onto some sort of platform that will allow ventilation underneath the base?

Once it's up. I'm going to replace the door with a double glazed (lockable!) door and probably out a few windows in. But as far as panneling out the inside goes. What sort of insulation would be best to use and what have people used as "wall" pannels?

I plan on installing some sort of heating to avoid damp inside the shed. Anyone got tips/tricks for insulating/paneling and heating a structure like this?

I'm planning on having a mid sized bench, a band saw and a drill press in there but I'm planning on a 12x12 size for storage space also!

Cheers guys!
 

wallace

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Hi, you said you wanted to get the 10 by 12 and then modify it with a better doar, insulation, panelled out and windows.
The frameing is only 35mm deep so you will be limited on what insulation polystyrene or kingspan. Its a nice shed but personally I dont think £700 nice before you start the mods. I notice it does not come with a floor as standard. If you wanted a concrete floor, it would be good to have a coarse of bricks around the base. Could you not build your own to the spec you want. It's probably going to cost you another £500 to insulate, panel out and add some windows. Anyway its more fun doing your own build. With regard to heating, oil filled radiators are a safe option, best avoid gas heaters because they produce loads of water.
Hope some of that helps.
Mark
 

Grahamshed

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The easiest way to insulate it is probably to cover the walls with Kingsoan or Celotex (sp?) ( tindoil coated polystyrene ) and then cover with your choice of plywood, osb etc.
 

mac1012

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i have a 8 x6 shed with one window on concrete base you said you re shingled the concrete base is there still concrete underneath ? i never bothered with pannelling got heater from b and q electric erm forget what they called now, has slits in top blows air up through and got thermostat , about 30 quid it can be mid feb and freezing but 10 minutes on full power and shed is toasty and then you can set thermo to keep just right temp otherwise gets too hot.

guess it depends how many hours a week you gonna be spending in there as to what setup is worth doing extra.
 

Dissolve

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wallace":22irpzm8 said:
Hi, you said you wanted to get the 10 by 12 and then modify it with a better doar, insulation, panelled out and windows.
The frameing is only 35mm deep so you will be limited on what insulation polystyrene or kingspan. Its a nice shed but personally I dont think £700 nice before you start the mods. I notice it does not come with a floor as standard. If you wanted a concrete floor, it would be good to have a coarse of bricks around the base. Could you not build your own to the spec you want. It's probably going to cost you another £500 to insulate, panel out and add some windows. Anyway its more fun doing your own build. With regard to heating, oil filled radiators are a safe option, best avoid gas heaters because they produce loads of water.
Hope some of that helps.
Mark
Hi,

Thanks for the advice, With regards to building it myself.. I can appreciate the advantages but I'm a bit unsure how to go about making the framework and then adding the cladding. What type of tongue and groove cladding would you recommend? I'll look into the cost and weigh up the pro's and con's.

Also what type of wood would I be looking to use for the framework?

Thanks!
 

Elapid

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Check the headroom on the sheds. I nearly got one from Garden Building Direct but they were really low and I'm tall so were no good.

I got mine from a company called K & Z Sheds. They deliver nationally and I got a tongue and groove shed from them delivered for less than anywhere else were selling overlap sheds. I only got a 12 x 8 but it's well made and big enough for what I do.

They will normally knock off a bit if you don't require a floor. At least they did for me anyway.

http://kzsheds.com/component/virtuemart ... hed-detail

EDIT: They are cheaper on EBAY and usually accept if you make an offer.
 

wallace

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I'm planning to extend my workshop and am going to be using 6"by 2" pressure treated for the floor and 4"by2" for the side sections covered in plywood. I might use some shiplap for the front to make it look all pretty. I just think for that amount of money you might be able to make something of much better spec. With regard to cladding I think if you avoid the flimsy stuff thats about 10mm you'll be fine. I usually use sheet stuff on sides that wont be seen its quicker and cheaper.
Mark
 

dickm

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Possibly not as aesthetically pleasing as shiplap, but my recently built store-shed used two partially overlapping layers of 150mm by16mm tanalised fencing boards, overlapping by 20mm each board. These cost about £1.50 for 1.8m lengths from our local agricultural supplies place - similar, but thinner shiplap would have been at least twice the price and wouldn't give as good insulatin. Works fine aesthetically here because that's how our house is clad.
But by using these plus reclaimed 4"x2" for the framing, a 10' by 8' shed came in at just over £200, including the concrete for the base slab.
 

wallace

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Thats what I like to here a bit lateral thinking. Theres always a cheaper way to do things.
 

Dissolve

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Thanks guys. Anyone know any good/cheap sources of tongue and groove cladding to price up my workshop?

As far as the base goes. Does anyone have some advise regarding my questions in the original post?

Thanks
 

Tom K

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dissolve":3ma7oqd3 said:
Thanks guys. Anyone know any good/cheap sources of tongue and groove cladding to price up my workshop?

As far as the base goes. Does anyone have some advise regarding my questions in the original post?

Thanks
Can you clarify what you mean by shingled is it just gravel laying on top of the old base? The main thing wether you buy or build is that the wood doesn't contact ground or sit in water.
 

dickm

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McGill":3vwoktr2 said:
Cladding is only 11mm thick.

Up here in the Frozen Northern Tundras of Scotland, that'd be in Norway before you knew it.
:D :D :D :D
Been out walking today, and it was one of those "bend double into the wind" ones!
 
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