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Framesaw WIP

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marcros

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Lacking a bandsaw, and wanting to be able to resaw some timber, I decided to have a crack at a framesaw.

It is probably not the most interesting WIP's but here goes nonetheless...

Stock selected was a piece of sawn QS oak, almost 6" x 1 1/2". It has been in the house for some months- in fact a second piece is one of the pieces that I want to cut down.

framesaw sawn.jpg


I wizzed it through the planer. The dimensions that I am working to are not particularly critical. I noted in mickthetrees thread that his end pieces were not man enough. We exchanged a couple of PMs and so I have sized my ends at 2 1/2 x 16" and the side pieces at about 1 1/2" square. I then transferred to metric and did them at 710mm long to accommodate the 700mm blade. The sides, when the blade i tensioned will be in compression so size shouldn't matter much.

Next pic stock cut to length.

framesaw stock.jpg


My plan is to use a bandsaw blade, but I have heard mixed reports. If it does not work then I thought that I would make it able to take one of the purpose designed blades from fine tools.

4 mortices to cut, so I thought I would try the 1910 morticer that I bought from ebay. I selected a chisel which was just under 1/2", quick swipe over the oil stone and away we go. I have a couple of action pic. The morticer cuts very easily- I went down to about an inch in depth. It seems to work bet with a very shallow row of small cuts to start, and i used a pig sticker to clear the waste. Care must be taken near to the end grain end- I did blow one out but you cant see it. I think it was just too much waste trapped in there. With the benefit of hindsight, a slightly larger tenon would have been better, but I don't think it will matter. I was impressed with the speed that the morticer allowed me to work. I don't know the textbook way of doing mortice and tenons, but with the mortices cut, I could then use them to set the tablesaw blade to height and did the first tenon.

framesaw morticer.jpg

framesaw morticer2.jpg


Then nursery pickup interrupted proceedings.

Now for some thought before continuing. I didn't think about the tenon length so I think I may have to trim the sides to fit the 600mm blade rather than the 700mm. I haven't cut the tenons so nothing really lost.

I want to try out fuming this using ammonia as a trial for some other projects. I will put tru-oil over the top I think. Being oak, any fitting will have to be stainless, but what was used in the days of old that wouldn't discolour the oak.

I hope to find some time over the weekend to finish the tenons and hopefully the frame. Next week I had better get the bolts and fixings together. When it is glued up, I will have a look at shaping any parts that need it. I don't have much in the way of tools, so hopefully it will just want the hard edges knocking off with a hand plane.
 

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deserter

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In the past Brass was a popular choice in oak.

To mortise on a machine cut the ends first and the join up the row, and cut to just over half depth, turn the workpiece and finish from the other side. Make the slot in you chisel point in a direction other than into the direction of work, I normally face it towards me, this ensures that waste won't fill up your cut as much. And finally when sharpening machine mortise chisels you sharpen the inside faces with a special bit, normally held in a brace for control though it can be done with a cordless.

Sorry if I have told you what you already knew, but if not it should help to limit the chance of blow outs in the future.


~Nil carborundum illegitemi~
 

marcros

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deserter":25a9m6q0 said:
In the past Brass was a popular choice in oak.

To mortise on a machine cut the ends first and the join up the row, and cut to just over half depth, turn the workpiece and finish from the other side. Make the slot in you chisel point in a direction other than into the direction of work, I normally face it towards me, this ensures that waste won't fill up your cut as much. And finally when sharpening machine mortise chisels you sharpen the inside faces with a special bit, normally held in a brace for control though it can be done with a cordless.

Sorry if I have told you what you already knew, but if not it should help to limit the chance of blow outs in the future.


~Nil carborundum illegitemi~
no this is all new to me so thank you. I get the first part, which seems obvious when I think about it, but I didnt know about ends first.
I am not sure I understand the part about the slot, or about the sharpening. Are you talking about a hollow chisel? This one is old school and solid, it has a bevel and thats about it!
 

marcros

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Ah, now I see. I had heard of this new fangled technology, but mine is leverage and brute force! The principles of cutting will be the same, and by the sounds of it sharpening is a whole lot more straightforward!

I will link to this for anybody else that is searching the forum in the future for sharpening hollow chisel morticers or who is interested in how it is/can be done.

http://www.newwoodworker.com/reviews/mortsharprvu.html
 

deserter

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I see, never used a solid style chisel, but I would imagine the curing order is the same, the idea is that in cutting only half depth you prevent breakout from the chisel exiting the hole, and by starting with the ends first you ensure clean cuts at the ends also.
What are the old school mortisers like to use? Do they take a tremendous amount of force to make the cut?


~Nil carborundum illegitemi~
 

marcros

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it is only the second test that I have done really but with a sharp 5/16" ish chisel it was effortless. larger ones might take a bit more but I was quite suprised how easy it was
 
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