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For Critique #2

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Bemused

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Good evening ladies and gents.
After playing in the shed today I now have my piece for critique #2.
It's a small Labernum bowl.

Its 6" wide and 3" high wall thickness 3/16", it came from piece of unseasoned log donated by a good friend.
The form also maximised the available blank size.
Again turned with my cheap Axminster bowl gouge and finished with 80-400 grit then just the first micro mesh at 1500 grit and polished with the Chestnut 'C' mop and pure Canauba wax.

I was after a nice classical ogee form but after chasing the shape around for some interesting sap wood and recovering the piece from a nasty knock I feel as though the form has maybe failed a little.

Thanks for comments
Tony






 

John. B

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Pleasing shape, good use of the grain pattern. Looks to have a good finish, (I like the choice of wood)

If I wanted to be a little picky, I could say it could be a little thinner in the wall,,,,,,

But I will not be picky, I'll just say "A very nice Job" well done!

John. B

Oh, and I must add, Very well presented, excellent photography!
 

Bemused

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Hi John thanks for the comments.
Please do be picky, after all I endeavour to gain from your experience.
I made a mistake in the first post and typed 3/8" instead of 3/16", I have now corrected the first post and agree 3/8" would be a little silly for such a form, I would have liked 1/8" but its a little beyond my competence.
 

Bemused

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Dieseldog":3hyfoosy said:
wish i had friends like yours :?
But it does have its drawbacks, he calls them his challenge pieces, you sort of feel real bad if one jumps out of the chuck (hammer)
however it does force you to try and extend.

Thanks for comments
 

Melinda_dd

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i won't know unless i ask...
being made from an seasoned log, will this piece now warp or crack?
or does that only happen to some woods not all?
thanks in advance for answers.
beautiful bowl, i love the colours of the wood.
 

Bemused

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Melinda_dd":er4wqm7y said:
i won't know unless i ask...
being made from an seasoned log, will this piece now warp or crack?
or does that only happen to some woods not all?
thanks in advance for answers.
beautiful bowl, i love the colours of the wood.
I will be interested in what happens also :D most wet pieces I turn seem to hold up ok so long as they are quite thin, I learned to
make sure the bottoms and feet were also thin.
Keep your fingers crossed for me.

And yes I think Laburnum is one of the most beautiful woods around.
 

Melinda_dd

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when i first started turning i didn't know one wood from the next. i found fast that my favourite was yew closely followed by elm .
I'm yet to turn laburnum yet but it is beautiful
i also think olive wood too has lovely figure and colour
 

Bemused

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chrisbaker42":luga8jih said:
Make sure you are well protected with laburnum - highly poisonous
Thanks for the warning Chris
 

Blister

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I like this piece

it does the wood justice and shows it off well

:wink:
 

Bemused

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chrisbaker42":1s2bbi7l said:
Make sure you are well protected with laburnum - highly poisonous
Also I am aware that the foliage of Yew is deadly so I assume the wood is perhaps Melinda is aware of this as its her favorite wood.
A great advantage of working in wet wood is the reduction in sanding dust, if working with seasoned Laburnum I often sand out with a linseed oil hence no dust just a slurry.

Btw is this the Chris Baker the editor?
 

Melinda_dd

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Yes I knew Yew is a nasty wood. 99% of my turning wood is already seasoned/ sealed ect as I buy it from my local wood turning supplies place (which I am lucky to say is only 1/2hr down the road) so folage is not a problem

But I never turn anything without my dust mask and face shield on.
 

Bemused

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Melinda_dd":2tcngv0z said:
Yes I knew Yew is a nasty wood. 99% of my turning wood is already seasoned/ sealed ect as I buy it from my local wood turning supplies place (which I am lucky to say is only 1/2hr down the road) so folage is not a problem

But I never turn anything without my dust mask and face shield on.
I was going to say you should try turning naked but that would be rude so I decided to keep it to myself :mrgreen:

Perhaps I enjoy more luck as most of my wood is just outside the door, but I have to take the leaves off first :lol: :lol:
 

Melinda_dd

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Don't think i'll try that one.... :oops:

1 my shed is viewable in the garden by the neighbours,,, next doors already had a heart op this year!
2 too bloody cold ... things would drop off
3 things would get all kinds of tangled up

so thanks, but i'll give that one a miss!

i would give anything to live among trees instead of people!
 

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