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Finishing with beeswax

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L2wis

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I've not had much joy using beeswax so was hoping someone might point me in the direction (even if that suggestion is not to use it).

I have no problem applying, however when then polishing it up a layer of the kitchen roll can sometimes be pulled in and wrapped in.

When I have got the wax buffed up without tissue attached, it doesn't look all that great a finish neither...
 

petercharlesfagg

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For more years than I care to remember I used pure beeswax for all my items. I found that it would not tolerate a lot of handling nor would it allow even the merest contact with fluids without turning into White spots!

I ditched it about 2 years ago and use either the Micro crystalline polish from Chestnut or Carnauba applied with the Beall system of mops.

Peter.
 

Haldane

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It's best to use some lint free cloth (just don't wrap it round you're fingers it can be very dangerous if the cloth gets trapped / caught and do serious damage to fingers and hand if they get pulled into the lathe) as any tissue will get worn out and dragged into the finish before the beeswax has chance to heat up and melt.
I usually apply the wax straight from the block onto the work piece then make a small and tightly wrapped pad from cloth, try to get the lathe speed as high as possible as you want to melt the wax with heat from friction with the cloth. Hold the cloth in the same place and let the heat build up and you will see the beeswax change colour and go clear slowly work you're way across the piece melting as you go. You can also apply a small amount of Mineral oil or BLO to the cloth which can help spread the wax out especially in difficult areas or if you get a build up of wax

Dave
 

Pipster

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dont use the beeswax polish that you get for polishing antique furniture/wood turning etc...find a local beekeeper and blag some beehive cone wax from them.
Melt it as you would chocolate.. IE.. in a bowl on top of a pan of hot water.( don't let water get into it) .then keep skimming the scum off the top until it is clear...Only this wax in its pure form will melt and treat the wood quickly.. the polish you buy for either turning or furniture polish has solvents in it like turpentine or paraffin or camphor. these can combust with heat of friction or crystalize giving white spots so dont waste your money..real beeswax should not need anything added to it.... if its too hard to wipe onto a cloth then add the oil of your choice that you would normally use for your wood as long as its solvent free
 

L2wis

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Thanks for all that great input guys! Very informative and are just the answers I was after. I wouldn't want to use an lint free cloth after experiencing the kitchen roll being snatched in so many times. But I can see how that would work a lot better.

I might move towards the car jabobson paste wax and mineral oil. Is mineral oil called mineral oil in the UK? Thatvor follow your footsteps peter and go down the microcrystalline wax route.
 

Paul Hannaby

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Another way to help spread the beeswax is to warm it a little with a hot air blower but don't overdo it or you will crack the wood! Having said that, I'm another one who no longer uses beeswax or paste wax because they show up the finger marks too much. I use renaissance wax instead.
 

L2wis

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Paul Hannaby":1b1eznv0 said:
Another way to help spread the beeswax is to warm it a little with a hot air blower but don't overdo it or you will crack the wood! Having said that, I'm another one who no longer uses beeswax or paste wax because they show up the finger marks too much. I use renaissance wax instead.
Your very right about finger prints! Pulling a pen piece off the mandrel after the does it no good!
 

Phil Pascoe

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I you insist on useing beeswax, you can melt it with a little pure turpentine (not substitute) and a little carnauba.
I will be easier to use than straight beeswax, and the finish will be a bit harder, but it'll still mark.
 
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