Quantcast
  • We invite you to join UKWorkshop.
    Members can turn off viewing Ads!

Finishing supplies?

UKworkshop.co.uk

Help Support UKworkshop.co.uk:

Munty Scruntfundle

Established Member
Joined
22 Sep 2019
Messages
71
Reaction score
0
Location
UK
Hi there.

I was sat in my local cafe earlier today, met a friend, her new mini person and the existing 3 year old toddler creature. Love em to bits, the 3 year old is a real treasure.

In a quiet moment I was pondering the finishing quality acceptable to a small person. Obviously they don't care. But I do!

I've picked up a few different sanding sealers to play about with and for the most part they're giving the finish I want on my pieces. I'm not turning pens, I'm not turning extremely expensive wood so as long as the grain shines and looks natural that's great.

But... Having turned a lovely bit of saple for the first time the other day, I have to say I'm tempted to sand it back again and wax it's buttocks off. But wax marks and dulls quickly and doesn't stand up to any handling. I completely get the CA finishing for smaller items, but a 12 inch bowl? Does that work, or does it get a bit sketchy?

If CA is out, should I go the french polish route? Happy to do it, but it'll mean a chuck out of use for a while.

I know the 4 parts to shiny surfaces, I've done a fair bit of 3d rendering before, understanding how the light acts is important. And I know there's no magic ingredient, getting a very fine finish takes care and time. And resources.

I suppose I'm actually asking - what finishing products do you folks use? And what is it you like about them? What steps do you take for high gloss on large pieces?

I know, I ramble!
 

Phil Pascoe

Established Member
UKW Supporter
Joined
29 Jan 2012
Messages
20,271
Reaction score
982
Location
Shaft City, Mid Cornish Desert
At your level you'd probably do well to avoid high gloss - it'll show every imperfection in your turning/finishing. Try various hardwax oils - they're easy and quick, and very good. Danish or finishing oils are good, hard wearing and easy to apply - you can bring them to quite a high gloss if you wish. If you want silly high gloss, try Rustin's Plastic Coating.
 

CHJ

Established Member
Joined
31 Dec 2004
Messages
20,131
Reaction score
72
Location
Cotswolds UK
Munty Scruntfundle":zcj7unr2 said:
...
In a quiet moment I was pondering the finishing quality acceptable to a small person. Obviously they don't care. But I do
First & foremost you need to check the specifications for the finishing product and ensure it is labelled and has certification as Child Safe.

Look for EN71-3 [the test for toy safety] on the product labelling.

Don't assume that just because one brand is tested & certified Child Safe that all brands with the same product title have been tested.

You also need to be aware of wood species that can cause allergies.
 

Terry - Somerset

Established Member
Joined
22 Dec 2012
Messages
686
Reaction score
201
Location
Taunton
I have occasionally used a "3 stage" system.

First sanding sealer which will allow sanding to a fine finish
Second spray gloss varnish - acrylic probably preferabe to cellulose in confined space
Third when varnish is dry - burnishing cream.

You can always put some wax on as a stage 4 although the finish will anyway be high gloss and durable.
 

CHJ

Established Member
Joined
31 Dec 2004
Messages
20,131
Reaction score
72
Location
Cotswolds UK
Munty Scruntfundle":3t6f6ql5 said:
….
In a quiet moment I was pondering the finishing quality acceptable to a small person. Obviously they don't care. But I do!.
.
Further to my previous comments about Child Safe finishes, I have been looking for online references for products as having to stand reading all the various tin labels is not really a great deal of help, especially for online ordering.

So far the only listing I've found, & that was more of an aside in a FAQ section of Chestnuts site, not an obvious place seeing a lot of these products are used by hobbyists who may not think about such aspects.
Q. Are the Chestnut Products’ Spirit Stains safe for use on toys?
A. We have not had the Spirit Stains toy-tested as we have been advised that provided they are completely enclosed within a toy-tested finish it is not necessary for them to comply with these regulations. The following products from our range have been independently tested and passed the relevant part of the EN-71 Regulations:
Acrylic Lacquer
Acrylic Sanding Sealer (both types)
Cellulose Sanding Sealer (both types)
Melamine Lacquer (both types)
Finishing Oil
WoodWax 22 Clear
Microcrystalline Wax
Shellac Sanding Sealer
Hard Wax Oil
Acrylic Gloss Lacquer
Acrylic Satin Lacquer
The above list as I said before is of no relevance to other product brands but it may act as a pointer as a possibility when checking labelling.
 

Roland

Established Member
Joined
14 Jul 2017
Messages
134
Reaction score
45
Location
Loughborough
Rightly or wrongly I’ve been using Osmo 3032 on childrens’ toys. The safety leaflet indicated that it is safe. Where the wood needs colouring I’ve mixed oil paint pigments with Osmo as a base. This did need careful selection, for example avoiding lead white. OK, I’m not making toys to sell and hence need certification, but they are my own grandchildren and relatives who might be biting them.
 

Munty Scruntfundle

Established Member
Joined
22 Sep 2019
Messages
71
Reaction score
0
Location
UK
All good info, thanks very much. I would of course always look for food safe, I don't think I have anything here that isn't. I'm a little surprised the cellulose is stamped ok. But hey, I'm no chemicalogist!
 

CHJ

Established Member
Joined
31 Dec 2004
Messages
20,131
Reaction score
72
Location
Cotswolds UK
Munty Scruntfundle":qb66iovb said:
All good info, thanks very much. I would of course always look for food safe, I don't think I have anything here that isn't. I'm a little surprised the cellulose is stamped ok. But hey, I'm no chemicalogist!
Be very cautious using the term Food Safe.
Food Safe as far as the certification is concerned means that it could and can be added to food products and consumed without risk to health and therefore could be used on pieces coming into contact with liquid or moist food for consumption.

Just because a product is certified as Child Safe does not mean it is Food Safe as far as consumption is concerned, just that under normal circumstances in its applied and cured form a child playing with it or putting the object in its mouth is not at risk of being subjected to exposure to harmful chemicals in high enough concentration to cause harm.

If you are interested in which Chemicals/Elements are checked for presence and concentration levels in Child Safe EN71-3 See this Listing.
 
Top