Quantcast

cutting veneered mdf...mad idea

UKworkshop.co.uk

Help Support UKworkshop.co.uk:

tombo

Established Member
Joined
26 Feb 2005
Messages
381
Reaction score
0
Location
Wirral, UK
If i lower my table saw blade so that it would just cut through the veneer and feed the material from the rear of the machine. I am thinking i would get an approximation of a scoring blade cut. Then i can raise the blade and cut in the normal direction. Opinions?

Tom
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Count your fingers first and check they are the same at the end after the wood is ripped out of them and the veneer splintered :roll:

Tombo, you can buy blades that score and cut at the same time. Triple cut is the name of the one I used (and recently Bean used it to cut veneered MDF very succesfully). These have every third tooth ground with a slightly higher point and with the cutting point in the centre of the blade rather than to alternating sides like the other teeth

Buy one of these and be safe

I got mine from a local sawblade supplier and sharpening specialist called Oswald Cox Ltd and located in Leicester (their phone number is on the web but no website)
 

Philly

Established Member
Joined
24 Nov 2003
Messages
6,874
Reaction score
0
Location
Dorset, England.
I've heard it recommended that you try cutting the veneer like you said BUT feeding the stock the correct way. Then raise the blade to a suitable height, flip the sheet over and take a full cut, with the "pre-trimmed" side down.
Hope this helps
OldWivesTalePhilly :D
 

MikeW

Established Member
Joined
15 Apr 2005
Messages
1,933
Reaction score
0
Location
Forest Grove, Oregon USA
I'm with Tony. I use a thin kerf CMT triple-chip grind when cutting veneer attached to a substrate.

The only time I had any trouble was when the veneer had not been glued well (I wonder who did that :roll: ). Scoring it first with a marking knife in that instance saved the panel.

Mike
 

Nailer

Established Member
Joined
11 Apr 2005
Messages
127
Reaction score
0
Location
Wirral.....Cheshire
I've been cutting a lot of oak veneered mdf of late myself and found a zero clerance insert and a decent crosscut blade does the job for me with little or no breakout.
Raising the blade about an inch or so above the thickness of the stock also reduces it alot on the top of the stock being cut.
If you haven't got a decent crosscut blade and your going to have to buy one then as the guy's have said a triple chip is prolly the way to go.

:D

Cheers
 

tombo

Established Member
Joined
26 Feb 2005
Messages
381
Reaction score
0
Location
Wirral, UK
Thanks for the quick response guys, though shouldn't you all be in your workshops :wink: I would try a triple chip blade but not on this machine i'm hoping to get the extra funds to replace it soon so a new blade would be a waste. Zero clearance may be the way to go.

Tom
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Tombo

confused by your reply. Why not a new blade on the current saw? The triple cut is the same inertia (more-or-less) as a standard blade and so any table saw can yuse it without problem - it is not like a dado requiring powerful motor and strong saw assembly
 

Bean

Established Member
Joined
12 Jan 2004
Messages
1,518
Reaction score
0
Location
scouting about
Triple Chip Blades are the only way to go, I used Tony's with a good zero clearence insert and had no problems at all ripping and just a little splintering whilst cross cutting, but not a problen though as I had to profile the edge.


Bean
 

tombo

Established Member
Joined
26 Feb 2005
Messages
381
Reaction score
0
Location
Wirral, UK
confused by your reply. Why not a new blade on the current saw?
what i meant to say is that i dont want to buy a blade as i am replacing the tablesaw and wont fit my new machine

Tom
 

Frank D.

Established Member
Joined
2 Dec 2004
Messages
446
Reaction score
0
Location
Montreal, Canada
I've used the back-feed method, just taking off about 1-2mm and it works in a pinch; it is more dangerous but the saw can't kick back much with so little of the blade engaged. You have to watch your fingers. With bulky panels it is more difficult to do. I agree with the others, zero-clearance insert and a good blade is the best way to go.
Frank
 
Top