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Chuck removal tips

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ScaredyCat

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Tried to remove my chuck from the Axminster AC305WL but I can't get it undone. The headstock nut is thin and difficult to get a good handle on with the generic, poorly fitting spanner(s) that are supplied. There doesn't appear to be anywhere on the chuck to get any purchase on, there's no chuck- side nut.

I worked around it to do what I wanted but, of course, the chuck is still on there.

Have any of you got any tips for removing a chuck that doesn't want to be removed?


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Robbo3

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Place a sturdy batten across the chuck, between the jaws. Lock the spindle if you can, then hit the batten with a mallet.
Although frowned upon, I use a washer, made from a plastic milk carton, between the chuck & the headstock.
 

Lons

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Robbo3":100gpg5t said:
Place a sturdy batten across the chuck, between the jaws. Lock the spindle if you can, then hit the batten with a mallet.
Although frowned upon, I use a washer, made from a plastic milk carton, between the chuck & the headstock.
+1
I use a washer on both my lathes and never had an issue either with the chucks coming loose during turning or getting them off.
 

Chris152

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Not sure it;s the solution but have you tried with a boa strap wrench? I used to use the key but was told it damages the works in the chuck so bought one and it works a treat. I can't lock the spindle so leave the allen key in the rear so it stops against the motor housing (on mine).
 

Phil Pascoe

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Lons":12r0jdzx said:
Robbo3":12r0jdzx said:
Place a sturdy batten across the chuck, between the jaws. Lock the spindle if you can, then hit the batten with a mallet.
Although frowned upon, I use a washer, made from a plastic milk carton, between the chuck & the headstock.
+1
I use a washer on both my lathes and never had an issue either with the chucks coming loose during turning or getting them off.
+ one on both points. Cut the washers from a flat part of a milk carton with a sharp pair of dividers - cut both diameters nearly through, then the outer one through first. Don't cut the inner one through first, you lose the centre. Damhikt. :lol: Get a wire brush and make certain the threads are clean, and a smear of light oil or wax doesn't hurt when you replace the chuck.
 

Duncan A

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I use a washer made from a Flora tub or similar. Thinner than a milk bottle but works just as well, with virtually no squish. Cut out using dividers as suggested by Robbo.
Duncan
 

Dalboy

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I can never understand why people feel the need to make up washers of any kind. I have been turning for over 10 years and never had problems removing a chuck or any other accessory that needs to be screwed on. I have a clean up every time I remove the chuck that includes the chuck and headstock spindle. I also remove the chuck after every session.
One of the reasons chucks get stuck is poor maintenance and one other spinning it on and jamming it up hard it only needs to be screwed up until it is tight against the register if not the first time you try to turn something it will tighten up too hard.
As for the Original posters problem of getting it off as stated place a piece of wood across the jaws and tighten them on it a soft hammer and a quick sharp blow will help remove it.
 

Duncan A

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Possibly part of the reason for jammed chucks is the increasingly common use of stainless steel in chucks and lathes. Stainless on stainless can lead to countless hours of fun in some (non-woodturning) situations.
Similarly, a weighty chunk of wood on a higher powered lathe plus a couple of good dig-ins can tighten a chuck onto its spigot. All part of the learning curve, no doubt much eased by Nev's routine of remove, clean, lubricate.
Although I advocated the use of a thin washer, I only ever use it on an Axminster faceplate, which grabs tight as soon as I look at it. I also had some flats machined on its boss to suit the faceplate spanner that came with the lathe.
Duncan
 

Phil Pascoe

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A whole post once again disappeared into the ether.
Mine jammed, both threads were clean and undamaged, 1 1/2" x 6.
This the 8mm bar I used to lock the spindle, and it took an 18" bar in the chuck with a lump hammer on it to shift it.
[attachment=0]DSCF0244.JPG[/attachment
Now I always use a washer. :D
 

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Droogs

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could you guys not use something like Copperease on the treads
 

Duncan A

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It's not primarily the threads. The chuck binds on the register - hence the use of a washer on the register. I suspect some registers are poorly machined with fine radial lines on their surface which act like a locking washer. Lubricant helps of course - on both the the thread and the register.
Duncan
 

Robbo3

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Each lathe & chuck has it's foibles. Finding out how to overcome them is one of the benefits of this forum.
I agree that it's bad practice to shock the chuck off the lathe by belting the chuck key especially those with toothed keys - though that was standard practice for removing the chuck from a Black & Decker drill. I admit to being lazy & using this method on my chuck with a hex key & on the Record SC3 because the key anchors in two places.
Axminster sell a 'C' spanner which I always use when removing their chucks.

A Boa or strap wrench may work but you won't know until you have tried it. The short, sharp shock treatment normally does & doesn't cost you anything.

I had to prove to a disbeliever that the chuck on my old Draper WTL90 lathe wouldn't move without the short sharp shock treatment yet came off relatively easily with a plastic washer installed.
 

ScaredyCat

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Sorry for the delay responding. Thanks for all the replies. All sorted now with a tap of a hammer on a bit of wood. (hammer)

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