Quantcast

Chainsaw Sharpening - Crosscutting vs Ripping

UKworkshop.co.uk

Help Support UKworkshop.co.uk:

Aled Dafis

Established Member
Joined
29 Sep 2005
Messages
1,173
Reaction score
0
Location
New Quay, West Wales
Following on from my previous thread on my recent stash of Laburnum, I thought it wise to post a new thread on sharpening chainsaw chains, and of the difference between crosscutting and ripping profiles on the chainsaw teeth. You don't need any special equipment to sharpen your saw other than a suitably sized file and filing gauge. The increase in efficiency I found from changing the tooth pattern was incredible, I'd guess at least a 50 - 70% increase in cutting speed. I was so impressed that I've now bought a second chain so that I can keep one dedicated to ripping.

Firstly this is a pic showing the common angle that most chainsaws are filed at, this is aimed at efficient crosscutting.



As you can see the file is angled at 60degrees to the chainsaw bar, and that the 30degree line on the filing gauge is parallel to the bar. I don't get the 30degree thing either, other than it being 30degrees from 90???

Ripping chain on the other hand is filed at 90degrees to the bar as in this pic. There's a 10degree mark on my filing gauge also, which suggests that this is also suitable for ripping, but the advice I was given was just to file at 90degrees.



Both tooth profiles are to be sharpened with the file level (parallel to the floor) or with a slight upward motion, and altering teeth should be filed from each side of the bar i.e. file every other tooth one way and then turn the saw around to file the remaining teeth.

If you have any further questions regarding the use of a chainsaw, I'm sure that there are a number of members far more qualified than myself to answer your question, but I'll do my best.

Caveat - Using chainsaws is very dangerous indeed, and all the necessary safety precautions should be taken before using your saw. I'm not qualified to train anybody in the use of chainsaws and I don't accept any responsibility as to your safety when using one. Please take my advice as just that, and above all use common sense at all times!!

Cheers
Aled
 

Bemused

Established Member
Joined
25 May 2011
Messages
125
Reaction score
0
Ahha, I see it now, must have jumped the gun a little.
Nice information.
I will see if I can get a picture up of my sharpening jig in the near future, maybe we could show our saws :p :p
 

Jonzjob

Established Member
Joined
19 Mar 2007
Messages
5,030
Reaction score
13
Location
Ex nr Carcassonne, S France. Now NW Wilts, UK
As we are on a turning forum this may not be amiss?

On another forum there was a chainsaw pro. Very good at carving with one and very cleaver and renouned tree surgon. He asked me, via the forum, if it would be possible to use a chainsaw coupled with turning. I mean use it on a lathe! I told him that I would send flowers if he did! But if he decided to try to kill himself then he would need to stand behind the lathe to have the chain and the wood turning in opposition :shock: :shock:

Well, he did try it. The reply to my cries not too was that he would NOT be trying it again! Something like "bleedin terifying" was his description!

The piont is that it is too dangerous even to think of! So don't! Please!
 

dickm

Established Member
Joined
25 Oct 2004
Messages
4,504
Reaction score
0
Location
North of Aberdeen
Hadn't thought of re-sharpening a chain like that. How long did each tooth take with a hand file?

On a slightly related topic, what has happened to our one-time resident chainsaw expert, the Big Soft Moose?
 

Aled Dafis

Established Member
Joined
29 Sep 2005
Messages
1,173
Reaction score
0
Location
New Quay, West Wales
I took just three stroke on each tooth on the first sharpening, which left the shape somewhere between rip and crosscut, and then two or three strokes on the next sharpening shaped the correct rip pattern. Sharpening only takes about 4 or 5 minutes each time, especially with the bar firmly clamped in an engineering vice at the bench.

As with all edge tools, sharpening little and often is much preferred over putting sharpening off and perservering with a blunt tool. Far more accidents happen when forcing blunt tools than when guiding sharp ones!

I'm not sure what happened to BSM but he's probably gone with a few others to the "haven".

Cheers
Aled
 

dickm

Established Member
Joined
25 Oct 2004
Messages
4,504
Reaction score
0
Location
North of Aberdeen
Aled Dafis":1yqv3l3o said:
I took just three stroke on each tooth on the first sharpening, which left the shape somewhere between rip and crosscut, and then two or three strokes on the next sharpening shaped the correct rip pattern. Sharpening only takes about 4 or 5 minutes each time,
You must have a pretty good file! It takes me all of 2-3 minutes with an Oregon 12V sharpener. Which is, of course, intended to be connected to the battery of your 4x4 pickup truck, and is probably most embarrassed at being hitched to my effete liberal Golf :D
 

Aled Dafis

Established Member
Joined
29 Sep 2005
Messages
1,173
Reaction score
0
Location
New Quay, West Wales
When bought in packs of 6, files work out at around £1 each, so when I feel that the file is no longer cutting, I chuck it.

I've learnt from teaching engineering for the past 6 years that there's absolutely no gain in using blunt files, they only bring frustration and slow, innacurate work!
 

boysie39

Established Member
Joined
6 Sep 2007
Messages
2,572
Reaction score
0
Location
carlow Ireland
Aled Dafis":24k36sc5 said:
I took just three stroke on each tooth on the first sharpening, which left the shape somewhere between rip and crosscut, and then two or three strokes on the next sharpening shaped the correct rip pattern. Sharpening only takes about 4 or 5 minutes each time, especially with the bar firmly clamped in an engineering vice at the bench.

As with all edge tools, sharpening little and often is much preferred over putting sharpening off and perservering with a blunt tool. Far more accidents happen when forcing blunt tools than when guiding sharp ones!

I'm not sure what happened to BSM but he's probably gone with a few others to the "haven".

Cheers
Aled
Aled, did you get the Glenn Lucas DVDs for Christmas by any chance :mrgreen:
 

Aled Dafis

Established Member
Joined
29 Sep 2005
Messages
1,173
Reaction score
0
Location
New Quay, West Wales
I did indeed, and very good it is too! I've always been an advocate of sharp tools and Glenn reinforced this. I've never been able to sharpen freehand though, despite trying for a while, I much prefer to use my Sorby Proedge - Tool!!

Glenn's DVD has spurred me to try a few things though, I tried roughing out left handed and found it to be quite efficient. I also took delivery of a plain ended Morse Taper spigot today to make one of his drive plates, but need to get back to school next week to turn the pins (modify some M8 stainless bolts). I'm also onthe look out for a 2" and 3" wad punch so that I can cut sanding pads from the standard 6" discs.....
 

Sawyer

Established Member
Joined
7 May 2011
Messages
581
Reaction score
0
Location
France
Jonzjob":bb1s16y9 said:
On another forum there was a chainsaw pro. Very good at carving with one and very cleaver and renouned tree surgon. He asked me, via the forum, if it would be possible to use a chainsaw coupled with turning. I mean use it on a lathe! I told him that I would send flowers if he did! But if he decided to try to kill himself then he would need to stand behind the lathe to have the chain and the wood turning in opposition :shock: :shock:

Well, he did try it. The reply to my cries not too was that he would NOT be trying it again! Something like "bleedin terifying" was his description!

The piont is that it is too dangerous even to think of! So don't! Please!
:shock: Gasp!! :shock:
Please tell me the bloke doesn't have a spindle moulder! #-o
 

duncanh

Established Member
Joined
17 Jan 2003
Messages
1,316
Reaction score
0
Location
Newcastle upon Tyne
Jonzjob":3lo20m4p said:
As we are on a turning forum this may not be amiss?

On another forum there was a chainsaw pro. Very good at carving with one and very cleaver and renouned tree surgon. He asked me, via the forum, if it would be possible to use a chainsaw coupled with turning. I mean use it on a lathe! I told him that I would send flowers if he did! But if he decided to try to kill himself then he would need to stand behind the lathe to have the chain and the wood turning in opposition :shock: :shock:

Well, he did try it. The reply to my cries not too was that he would NOT be trying it again! Something like "bleedin terifying" was his description!

The piont is that it is too dangerous even to think of! So don't! Please!
I saw a video of someone doing this. They had build a jig (I think) that held the chainsaw and enabled it to slide along the length of the lathe. Can't remember if the wood turned into it or away from it but it was scary. It did appear to work fairly well though - although that's not a good reason to do it. DON'T!
 

chipmunk

Established Member
Joined
20 Sep 2011
Messages
1,100
Reaction score
0
Location
Windermere Cumbria
I think using a chainsaw on the lathe must be up there with collecting car sump numbers on the M1 :wink:

He sounds lucky to walk away from the experiment.

Thanks Aled. It's a useful post for those of us wanting to rip logs.

When using your rip chain are you still cutting with the saw angled along the log or is the saw cutting truly perpendicular to the log?

Jon
 

Aled Dafis

Established Member
Joined
29 Sep 2005
Messages
1,173
Reaction score
0
Location
New Quay, West Wales
chipmunk":18n7q5oy said:
I think using a chainsaw on the lathe must be up there with collecting car sump numbers on the M1 :wink:

He sounds lucky to walk away from the experiment.

Thanks Aled. It's a useful post for those of us wanting to rip logs.

When using your rip chain are you still cutting with the saw angled along the log or is the saw cutting truly perpendicular to the log?

Jon
Yes I use the saw perpendicular to the log.

Here's a pic of how it's done with a proper chainsaw ripping mill.



http://www.alaskanmill.co.uk

Cheers
Aled
 

chipmunk

Established Member
Joined
20 Sep 2011
Messages
1,100
Reaction score
0
Location
Windermere Cumbria
Aled, Thanks.

I think I can see why in a chainsaw mill they'd want to do it that way but I wonder whether there'd still be an advantage in angling the saw down for a hand-held use. This is the way I've found works best with a cross-cut chain in the past so that the shavings are longer and I see from your pile of shavings that's what you were doing (I think). Did you experiment by any chance?

I think that even with a hand rip saw you'd still tend to angle the saw but I'm not sure how much of that is about efficiency and how much is comfort :?

Jon
 

nev

Established Member
Joined
21 Jan 2011
Messages
4,858
Reaction score
10
Location
The green and wetter end of the M4.
my instruction book and experience say to cut along the log (C) or as close to as the saw permits. much quicker and safer than A with the std chain config.







usual disclaimer: i didnt say do it, i said thats how i do it!
 

chipmunk

Established Member
Joined
20 Sep 2011
Messages
1,100
Reaction score
0
Location
Windermere Cumbria
Hi Nev,
Yes that's my experience with a standard chain too - and I think to be fair Aled's other thread on cutting the laburnum suggests that's how he did it before regrinding his cross-cut chain to a rip tooth profile.

My question relates to the best way to use the rip chain and whether there might be an advantage to angling the saw in those cuts too.
Jon
 

boysie39

Established Member
Joined
6 Sep 2007
Messages
2,572
Reaction score
0
Location
carlow Ireland
Forget using your chainsaw on the lathe !! I can do as much damage with turning tools :shock: :shock: :oops: :oops:

I have just guntered two lovely bowl blanks #-o #-o First real effort since last June and seem to have forgotten the little bit that I did know. :shock:

Oh well back to the drawing board.
 

Bemused

Established Member
Joined
25 May 2011
Messages
125
Reaction score
0
A pic of my sharpening jig
Works very well for me.

 

Aled Dafis

Established Member
Joined
29 Sep 2005
Messages
1,173
Reaction score
0
Location
New Quay, West Wales
chipmunk":2zoduap5 said:
Hi Nev,
Yes that's my experience with a standard chain too - and I think to be fair Aled's other thread on cutting the laburnum suggests that's how he did it before regrinding his cross-cut chain to a rip tooth profile.

My question relates to the best way to use the rip chain and whether there might be an advantage to angling the saw in those cuts too.
Jon

Yes that's exactly right, I used cut C on my first few cuts with a crosscuting chain, but swithced to cut A with the ripping profile. The chips produced are completely different by the way, croscutting chain produces long ribbons, whereas ripping chain produces a much finer sawdust.

As regards anging the saw with ripping chain, I honestly don't know, but I doubt it, otherwise somebody would have developed a milling rig that uses that to it's advantage.

Cheers
Aled
 

Latest posts

Top