Bending a cap iron.

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MikeG.

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One of my cap irons is noticeably less sprung than the others. Now and then a shaving will get stuck under it, despite the end of the cap iron being well fettled. I am planning on just putting it in the wood vice, and giving it a bit of tap with a hammer and block of wood. I can't see any potential issues, but wondered if anyone had any words of wisdom for me before I change its shape.
 
I dare say you've tried this already, but if not, it might be worth giving the lever cap screw in the frog a quarter-turn or so, such that the lever cap applies a tad more pressure.
 
I found a bit of steel bar or something when I did one of mine, just clamped it in as a former.

CC- once in a while a cap iron comes along that seems to be flatter (or has been flattened for some reason) which could do with re shaping. Tightening it down more doesn't seem to achieve much if it's not the correct shape to start with.
 
Cheshirechappie":3dob8xh0 said:
I dare say you've tried this already, but if not, it might be worth giving the lever cap screw in the frog a quarter-turn or so, such that the lever cap applies a tad more pressure.

That's already as tight as practical.

I compared it to the other cap irons I've got and it is definitely flatter.

Phil Pascoe":3dob8xh0 said:
CC- once in a while a cap iron comes along that seems to be flatter (or has been flattened for some reason) which could do with re shaping. Tightening it down more doesn't seem to achieve much if it's not the correct shape to start with.

Exactly.
 
That's pretty much it, just bend a little doing whatever you need to do to make sure that the bending is occurring near the business end.
 
Just clamp it in the vice an wack in the middle, you might need to refettle it afterwards as they sometimes don't bend evenly.
I have made a few from 3mm steel and they take a metalwork vice and a big hammer to bend but a original one is easy.

Pete
 
I trust after you’ve thrashed it in your vice Mike you’ll do your utmost to fettle the cap iron so it can be set 3.768888 microns back off the tip of the iron to give maximum performance :-k :lol:
 
:lol:

It's only when using the cap iron up close that I get any issues with the lack of spring with this particular one. One or 2mm back from the edge and nothing ever goes up there. The close set cap is a useful technique to have, but it isn't the be-all and end-all, and it certainly isn't a subject which should be raised when beginners ask about sharpening their first plane.
 
Without meaning to divert the OP -
The close set cap is a useful technique to have ...
I'm always surprised this is treated as some recent revelation - we were taught it at about 13 years old, 53 years ago in school. :?

By the bye. :D
 
Phil Pascoe":2ukgmokp said:
Without meaning to divert the OP -
The close set cap is a useful technique to have ...
I'm always surprised this is treated as some recent revelation - we were taught it at about 13 years old, 53 years ago in school. :?

By the bye. :D
+1 on this. It's forum froth :roll:
 
As with most “new” revaluations they are reworked old ideas that someone is trying to make a buck from one way or another & folks are taken in by.
 
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I have done this to the cap iron of my record No 4 without problems. It's only a minute bend that is required. I have another perversion to confess - the working end of my cap irons have all been polished to a high shine, it any be nonsense but I think it gives a tiny improvement in performance.
 

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Rather than bending a chip breaker or cap iron, I simply grind/hone the bevelled surface that is supposed to be tight up against the cutter. This usually includes taking a bit off the trailing edge, so when the thing is assembled and tightened up you don't get a gap opening up at the leading edge. I also slightly snub the leading edge.
 
Mine's been like that forever, W2S, but unless it is pulled up tight against the iron it still isn't foolproof. It can't pull up tight unless there is a little spring in the system.
 
Mike Jordan":1jn41r11 said:
I have done this to the cap iron of my record No 4 without problems. It's only a minute bend that is required. I have another perversion to confess - the working end of my cap irons have all been polished to a high shine, it any be nonsense but I think it gives a tiny improvement in performance.

that makes me a pervert, too - I don't necessarily seek the polish, but after I stone the front edge of the cap into some uniformity (get rid of the damage, I run it across a deburring wheel and a hard buffing wheel. polish is the result. Nice thing about it is it gets rid of the obnoxious wire edge without much effort.
 
A useful technique for creating suitable clearance angle on the underside edge, is to use the edge of a diamond stone and a wooden prop.

If the top of the prop is 3mm below stone height, this will give a clearance angle of approximately 1 1/2 degrees.

I find this works very well.

David Charlesworth
 
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