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Bathroom extractor fans.

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John Brown

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Our new(to us) house has two main bedrooms, each with en-suite bathrooms. The extractor fans are completely useless, and both bathrooms get totally steamed up when using the shower.
Since the two bathrooms are right next to each other, I was wondering about the feasibility of mounting a super powerful fan in the attic, with a simple ceiling vent in each bathroom, and then using the existing 100mm roof outlet that currently serves one of the bathrooms(the other goes straight out through 2 or 3 feet of wall).
I'd like to use the existing 100mm outlet if possible, as the roof is Cotswold stone, and that section is not readily accessible.
Something like this, perhaps:

https://www.i-sells.co.uk/manrose-mf100 ... B#tabPane1

which seems to have about 4 times the throughput as the existing fans.
 

sunnybob

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Theres a balance to be struck, between removing steam, and removing all your Central heating warm air as well.
Dont go too big with the fans, its not a workshop :shock: 8)
 

Trainee neophyte

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I thought of a cheaper solution, but you might not like it: turn your hot water thermostat down. Sounds like you have a sauna currently.
 

sunnybob

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OR... turn the heating up. :shock:
Steam will only condense on the walls if the wall temp is lower than 18c. get the room up to 23 and the steam will be much less and just disperse by itself =D> =D>
 

Dibs-h

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John Brown":2g6dkrvm said:
Our new(to us) house has two main bedrooms, each with en-suite bathrooms. The extractor fans are completely useless, and both bathrooms get totally steamed up when using the shower.
Since the two bathrooms are right next to each other, I was wondering about the feasibility of mounting a super powerful fan in the attic, with a simple ceiling vent in each bathroom, and then using the existing 100mm roof outlet that currently serves one of the bathrooms(the other goes straight out through 2 or 3 feet of wall).
I'd like to use the existing 100mm outlet if possible, as the roof is Cotswold stone, and that section is not readily accessible.
Something like this, perhaps:

https://www.i-sells.co.uk/manrose-mf100 ... B#tabPane1

which seems to have about 4 times the throughput as the existing fans.
Where are your fan inlets in the current en-suites, relative to the shower cubicles?
 

Fitzroy

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I had a similar problem. My fan was ceiling mounted exhausted via a 100mm hose out of a slate vent. Above my shower room is a roof void.

I replaced a standard 75m3/hr job with a 225m3/hr unit from screwfix. It made a world of difference but a couple of learnings. It’s a much bigger motor and it wants to vibrate stuff. First I had to mount in on some foam matting to stop it making a drum skin out of the ceiling. Second minimising the hose length is key to making the most of the air it moves, at first I was disappointed until I worked on the hose routing and making sure it wasn’t squashed by the insulation.

HTH

F.
 

Lons

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I did it years ago when I refurbished the en-suite and bathroom which are back to back. There was nothing in the bathroom and a basic 4" wall fan in the en-suite which I removed. I put a standard Screwfix ceiling in line extractor in the attic above each room and linked the outlet hoses to a single wall outlet and it works for us. The important point is that the location of each is immediately above the source of the steam i.e. in the shower cubicle and above the bath. The one in the shower has a built in light which is a bonus.

I did however also insulate the walls though it was only 25mm polystyrene as the external walls are very exposed.
 

boardgamer

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In my previous bathroom renovation, I installed an 8" axial fan in the ceiling, with ducting in the loft to an outside wall. This was OK, but I found that a *lot* of condensation occurred in the ducting in the ceiling. (Of course it would, there's a huge temperature difference in the Winter.) In my most recent renovation, I went back to a wall fan in the bathroom, and it works fine.
 

John Brown

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sunnybob":27ngftuv said:
Theres a balance to be struck, between removing steam, and removing all your Central heating warm air as well.
Dont go too big with the fans, its not a workshop :shock: 8)
My viewpoint is that I cab either remove the humid air over 30 minutes, or over 10 minutes.
 

John Brown

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Trainee neophyte":3pf5m9kk said:
I thought of a cheaper solution, but you might not like it: turn your hot water thermostat down. Sounds like you have a sauna currently.
Great! Cold showers for all! Can I ask you to break the news to my wife and the rest of the family?
 

John Brown

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Dibs-h":nckl902g said:
John Brown":nckl902g said:
Our new(to us) house has two main bedrooms, each with en-suite bathrooms. The extractor fans are completely useless, and both bathrooms get totally steamed up when using the shower.
Since the two bathrooms are right next to each other, I was wondering about the feasibility of mounting a super powerful fan in the attic, with a simple ceiling vent in each bathroom, and then using the existing 100mm roof outlet that currently serves one of the bathrooms(the other goes straight out through 2 or 3 feet of wall).
I'd like to use the existing 100mm outlet if possible, as the roof is Cotswold stone, and that section is not readily accessible.
Something like this, perhaps:

https://www.i-sells.co.uk/manrose-mf100 ... B#tabPane1

which seems to have about 4 times the throughput as the existing fans.
Where are your fan inlets in the current en-suites, relative to the shower cubicles?
Cubicles? It's not that posh... The showers are over the bathtubs.
Having said that, the fans are pretty much in the diagonally opposite corners. I take your point, but I think the current siting has more to do with proximity to outside walls.
 

John Brown

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Bit more research, and it seems I can get more conventional wall/ceiling mounted fans that claim almost the same throughput as the inline one I linked to earlier. Maybe I'll get one and give it a go, before starting major works.
 

sammy.se

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boardgamer":2m52gicq said:
In my previous bathroom renovation, I installed an 8" axial fan in the ceiling, with ducting in the loft to an outside wall. This was OK, but I found that a *lot* of condensation occurred in the ducting in the ceiling. (Of course it would, there's a huge temperature difference in the Winter.) In my most recent renovation, I went back to a wall fan in the bathroom, and it works fine.
Was your ducting the foil and fibre insulated type?

Sent from my SM-G973F using Tapatalk
 

sammy.se

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Also, I have read that you need to have enough airflow into the bathroom for the extraction to work, most people solve this by trimming an inch off the bottom of the door.

I have poor extraction, via wall fan, same as you, but I don't want a gap in the bathroom door!

I'm considering an 6" inline fan in the loft, with insulated ducting, to an external wall, in order to improve extraction.



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disco_monkey79

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What about fitting a vent in the door? There must be a way to do it prettily/tidily? I mean in order to improve airflow, so the fan can work better (not fitting the extractor fan in the door)
 
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