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Ash and walnut wardrobe

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Hornbeam

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One of the problems with wardrobes are they are big pieces and moderns stairs are much smaller. The staircase dictated that the maximum width was 800mm and the max height was 1900 by 560 deep. The design of the stairs means that it had to be tilted and clear a low ceiling on the half landing so good old Pythgoras ensured that I had 10mm of clearance.
The panels are all ash faced veneer, 12mm for the doors and sides and 8mm for the back. I couldnt get double sided veneered ply but used single sided and laminated it in my home made vacuum press20200410_160456.jpg
This was a slight error as the quality of the ply wasnt as good as I had hoped and the ash veneer had been sanded to a whisker

The frame is 43mm square walnut with all the corner joints as double domino joints. This was my first project using the domino and I was thoroughly impressed
The frames were dry assembled and the internal edge rounded over. Grooves were then cut for the panels
The side runners and shelf supports are ash and these were also dominod into the walnut frames. Each side frame was then assembled, the ash panels having been sanded and sealed with acrylic sealer. These were glued in al round.
The drawer dividers are also domino jointed into the main frame, and drawer stops mortices cut prior to assembly20200502_142554.jpg
The top panel sits flush with the walnut edging. This was glued into rebated in the walnut taking care to align everything ready for the next assembly stage
Sides made, top made, drawer dividers made. Now ready for the big glue up which was quite stressful but everything went together reasonably well. Problem now is that small easily manageable pieces have now become one large lump. Fortunately my some is a good assistant moving and holding things.20200502_142531.jpg
The back panel is walnut rails and stiles, grooved to take the ash back panels. The frame is domino jointed. Again the ash panels were sanded and sealed prior to assembly. The framed panel was fitted to the back. I then routed grooves down both sides of the back frame and the main carcase. A loose tongue is dry fitted into the grooves in the carcase and the frame is slid in from the bottom and held in from the inside with 2 screws. This means there are no visible fixings for the back panel
Drawer runners were carefully screwed into the sides. I did not fit lateral drawer dividers at the back as I felt everything was solid enough. Corner brace blocks were fitted at the bottom to stiffen everything up and attach the plinth
Once the carcase was complete the walnut was carefully sanded and the edges rounder over with a 19mm round over bit. The bottom edge of the back panel frame is also rounded. Mortices were cut for top and bottom door stops
Everything was then finally sealed
The plinth is lipped ash ply biscuited to walnut posts with corner blocks to stiffen it up and allow attachment to the carcase (the plinth has to come of to go up the stairs)
Doors are ash frames and veneered panels glued in all round
I made small wooden plugs to fit in the ends of the hanging rail to stop the end marking the panel sides20201026_144137.jpg
Drawers are traditional construction with lapped dovetails at the front and through dovetails at the rear. I used birch ply for the bases
Handles are turned as a discs and sectors cut off to make the handles20201026_144043.jpg20201028_135525.jpg
All panels and frames were finished with 2 or 3 coats of acrylic sanding sealer followed by acrylic lacquer. As these products are water based I find it best to dampen the surface to raise the grain before final sanding and sealing. This was then finished with a wax polish
I now have the task of a matching 7 drawer tallboy20201028_135438.jpg20201028_135704.jpg
 

Cabinetman

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Most impressive Hornbeam, I wouldn’t have risked using my maths to risk going up through a staircase like that though lol. I would probably have cut out a piece of cardboard the same size or something. Is it English or American ash, I use American a lot. In the past I’ve contrasted it with mahogany, but walnut looks very nice I must say.
I have never used acrylic sealer or lacquer, is it sprayed on? Ian
 

Hornbeam

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They recommend brush or foam brush but I find that can leave it a bit streaky. I use a cloth and rub it on and then go over the surface with the cloth while still wet and remove any lines/ bubbles. I use the same process for both the sealer and the lacquer, just use a bit more sparingly on the top coats. I denib in between with 320 grit but only lightly as it can clog the paper quickly. In general I prefer oil finishes but find the acrylic seems to retain the whiteness of the ash a lot better. Ian
 

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