Anybody seen a gate bolt like this one?

UKworkshop.co.uk

Help Support UKworkshop.co.uk:

This site may earn a commission from merchant affiliate links, including eBay, Amazon, and others.

JSW

Established Member
Joined
22 Jun 2015
Messages
367
Reaction score
186
Location
Leeds
... and more to the point, what is wrong with it?


IMG_20240514_201227913.jpg
 
A Brenton Bolt I believe. These should be fitted using thin bolts in some ( where the washers have been placed) or all of the holes, otherwise they can be opened with a screw driver.
You have a choice in this instance of removing the 4 screws holding the keep, or the 4 screws holding the packer block in position, to open the door.
 
So much wrong with that picture: wrong choice of padlock, the four screws on the bolt keep, the screws on the bolt itself... just a 🤦‍♂️ all round.
 
I can't see anything right with it. In terms of security it ticks no boxes. A determined thief will likely get past most padlock and bolt arrangements with an bit of work but that is almost an invite to come in.
Regards
John
 
The padlock staple is too long so you can still open the bolt.

Yep, this one is the kicker, all the other failings can be glossed over as just amateurish, but the staples design is such that even a standard size padlock allows the bolt to open enough to force entry.
I did a Google search before posting, and can't find this style of Brenton bolt, but either way it's a flawed design. It's not my gate btw, but I'll suggest that it be replaced.
 
Last edited:
So much wrong with that picture: ...the four screws on the bolt keep, the screws on the bolt itself...

Can you outline the correct way?

More specifically, write down what fasteners and tools are required to fix it correctly.

With the keep, sure, it it better bolted into place. But on a 4" nominal gate post that would need 4 1/2" long M6 coach bolts. They do not come in the package with the lock.

With the bolt, for "security" the coach bolts need the heads on the outside of the gate (or the miscreant could just unscrew the nuts from the outside). That means you need tools to trim the bolts on the inside fairly close to the nut once installed or you either lacerate your fingers on any bolt threads projecting from the nut or the projecting threads (and sometimes even the nut) impedes the bolt sliding.

These items are made with some of the holes square, to capture the head of the coach bolt but they only work that way if the bolt itself is on the _outside_ and the burglar only sees the head of the coach bolt. The baddie can remove all the screws but the bolts with have their nuts on the "secure" side and cannot be removed.

It is a challenging design problem: which side of the gate should the bolt go and how the best fixing differs depending on which side is chosen. Whatever is chosen, "security" is nothing if you can reach over the top of the gate and access the back of the bolt.
 
I suppose how secure you want the lock to be. If you need better security then a better lock and fixing is required but if you just want to deter anyone from strolling into your garden/yard, then this lock would do enough. I don't see how the padlock would allow the lock to open. A nail through the bolt would stop it opening.
 
Garden sheds and gates can normally be locked with a decent hasp and staple but if a padlock is used then it needs to be suited to the size of the H&S used. There should be no gap for a screwdriver or similar to pass through the staple so that a twisting motion could be used to snap it. Equally, there should be no room for inserting a strip of aluminium down the side of the staple to push the lock mechanism open even though this method is rarely successful. After deciding and fitting the lock side you then need to consider the hinge side. It's no use securing the latch if Billy-Burgular can unscrew the hinges and open the gate from that side. I've included photos of the cheapest and possibly crappiest padlock, hasp and staple so as not to recommend any in particular because, to be frank, I don't know enough about the different makes to advise. Whatever most people do, it will only make it a little more difficult for them to take things from the garden especially large items. It won't be able to stop them when they are determined.

1715757511074.png1715757579150.png
 
If the padlock is rotated 90 degrees, I suspect the length of the padlock shackle is such that the bolt could be drawn back from the saddle.
 
If the padlock is rotated 90 degrees, I suspect the length of the padlock shackle is such that the bolt could be drawn back from the saddle.

Exactly, and as I noted earlier, even a standard sized padlock gives enough wiggle room to move the bolt far enough back that a good kick would probably be enough to gain entry
 
An angle grinder would have that off in a few seconds. Incidentally you can get security screws which only tighten clockwise. They cannot be undone with a screwdriver.
 
The bolt and padlock serve only to dissuade the casual or opportunist - it might make some noise and alert someone. Most garden sheds cannot be described as structurally impressive. A well aimed kick or small crowbar would enable entry within about 15 seconds.

Having said that inadequate padlocks and exposed screws almost scream "invitation".

A building site portacabin theft some years ago - it contained a safe in which the wages (then paid in cash) were stored before being filled by the wages clerks.

Alert to the risk of theft, the trades on site were asked to encase the outside of the safe with bricks and mortar. They sadly failed to realise the back of the safe was only as secure as the thin plywood wall of the cabin. The predictable happened - no-one got paid that week.
 
An angle grinder would have that off in a few seconds. Incidentally you can get security screws which only tighten clockwise. They cannot be undone with a screwdriver.
Sadly in these days of cordless tool, most locks, security systems , will buy you, others, time to notice that someone is trying to gain entery
 
On our Wimbledon site the cabins where constantly being broken into so they where fully alarmed and that is what they stole, the complete alarm system and all the fire extinguishers, nothing else, no plant or materials, we then bought surveillance (euthanised) for the site from a local known villain and all our troubles stopped.
 
Back
Top