Any recommendations for light, mains powered angled drill for bowl sanding?

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Rodpr

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I currently use a cordless drill for sanding, with 50mm sanding pads and discs but this really seems to run the battery down quickly.

Mains powered drills tend to be very heavy and bulky and all the angle drills I have seen are also pretty hefty. Has anyone come across a very basic, light mains powered motor that I could use for this?

I guess another option might be to experiment with a flex drive mounted to an old corded drill that I could attach to the lathe bedways.

I imagine there must be a suitable tool out there somewhere!
 
Your sanding pad is 30 to 50mm dia.
A drill has to make a lot of torque to spin that and you are using it continuously. So equivalent to drilling many large bore holes. No surprise the cordless doesn't last long.

I'd get a milwaukee 12v drill driver with a couple of bigger batteries - they are surprisingly powerful and I think they cope. I've used one with flap wheels etc. One battery on charge while you run down the other.
Or try a second, bigger battery for whatever you already have.

I don't think a decently flexible drive will be durable enough to handle the torque and duration of use.
Angle attachments will be either too big or not durable enough to last.
Corded angle drills mostly seem to be bulky and geared down a lot for jobs like pushing big wood bits through joists.
 
Thanks Sideways, I can’t really justify that kind of budget. I wonder if a Dremel type tool with angle attachment might work. It is spinning a 50mm pad but resistance is much less than for drilling (I try not to press too hard!). Maybe a tool for trimming dogs’ claws?
 
I do have a compressor and a small air drill but put off by noise! May end up being my best option.
I've got an air sander, claims it only needs 4.5cfm, the compressor I use is an oil less type, lot quieter than the older type, but only a small tank but 8.5cfm, and that's not good enough.

Going to try changing air fittings as this guy has done. But on the to do list, way down my priorities at moment. The improvement he gets is impressive.

 
How long are you sanding for? Most demos I've seen where they use a power drill (not many) it's probably only 30 seconds and less as you go to finer grits. Or try an unpowered bowl sander, once you get the knack of using the right pressure on the edge they spin nicely. I made my own from an old chair castor.

I sometimes use a small vibrating sander, black & decker mouse, on the outside, as long as you use it lightly and keep it moving you don't get flat spots. I mainly use it for bowl bottoms if I've removed the tenon completely. Won't do insides though.

If you are a relative beginner sanding is a time consuming task, it was for me at least. As you get better with the tools you sand far less so maybe try not to spend too much on kit that will be less used in a year or few.
 
I have a 240v Metabo right angled drill, had it for many years and it's a good solid, powerful tool( mainly used for drilling through wooden joists)
......It is a bit weighty though!

Makita also make a similar tool and it weighs about 1kg lighter than the Metabo.
I imagine the Makita only weighs about the same as a cordless version ...?
 
I have a cordless impact driver for when I need high torque
How long are you sanding for? Most demos I've seen where they use a power drill (not many) it's probably only 30 seconds and less as you go to finer grits. Or try an unpowered bowl sander, once you get the knack of using the right pressure on the edge they spin nicely. I made my own from an old chair castor.

I sometimes use a small vibrating sander, black & decker mouse, on the outside, as long as you use it lightly and keep it moving you don't get flat spots. I mainly use it for bowl bottoms if I've removed the tenon completely. Won't do insides though.

If you are a relative beginner sanding is a time consuming task, it was for me at least. As you get better with the tools you sand far less so maybe try not to spend too much on kit that will be less used in a year or few.
Yes, I don't want to put too much into sanding gear. My cordless DeWalt drill does the job and I can switch batteries but it seems like there should be a lighter option, given that sanding like this does not need a huge amount of power.
 
Iirc someone on here bought an old 12v black and decker drill and rigged it up to run from a transformer by making an adapter from wooden dowel. Might be an option
 
The Makita is a great tool and widely used by professional turners. And by me - not with results like the professionals though:)
 
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