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Advise please nail guns and nails

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hunggaur

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hi folks hopefully i an going to be building an extension and loft conversion.

I know i need a framing nailer poss gas rather than compressed air. which is the best value for money.

also part of the structure will be clad so i would like to nail the cladding on with stainless steel nails.

what type of nail gun do i use do they make short nails for a framing nailer (30mm ish) or do i need a finish nail if so what sort/size of nails do they fire are the same as the brad nailer i have 18 gauge or are the nails thicker.

hope this makes sense

cheers jon
 

Digit

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Can't help on the nailer I'm afraid Jon, but on the subject of SS nails.
I have used them for cladding, they are expensive and I found that they not very sucessful.
Cladding will respond to changes in conditions and SS nails don't rust, instead they tend to come adrift and work their way out of the frames.
I live in a timber building Jon and I have over 20 yrs experience of cladding etc and now use plain nails. Yes they rust, this causes them to expand and stay where you put 'em!

Roy.
 

ade1

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hi jon, my 2nd fix paslode takes 16g, from (i think) 16 - 64mm pins, shortest i've used being 25mm, the 1st fix can be either 2.8 or 3.1mm from 51-90mm, theres all sorts of different types from ss to galv, smooth through to ring shank, the latter giving most resistance to coming back out. reckon the equivalents, spit bostitch etc are prob the same specs. hope thats of some help, ade
 

Digit

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ring shank, the latter giving most resistance to coming back out.
Yes they do, it's quite surprising how far a plain nail can end up protruding above the cladding.

Roy.
 

hunggaur

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cheers for all that folks, are 16 gauge thicker than 18 gauge ??? if so approx how thick are they and can you get ring shank version

many many thanks

Jon
 

Digit

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16 gauge is thicker than 18. 16 is is approx 1/16 inch or 1.5 mm diameter.

Roy.
 

ade1

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roy, i was only saying earlier that the ring shank gives more resistance than the smooth/plain due to its ribs on the body.

jon, just checked my paslode 25mm & 63mm nails (16g), they have part ribs along the body, there may likely be a variation between manufacturer in pattern though. ade
 

Digit

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roy, i was only saying earlier that the ring shank gives more resistance than the smooth/plain due to its ribs on the body.
I was agreeing with you. :?:

Roy.
 

Dominion

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For framing out use smooth 90's, I tend to find the Paslode doesn't quite have the power to drive 90mm ring shanks reliably, hit a knot or a harder bit and you can get a nasty kickback.

Anything under 90mm though and ring shanks are the nails to go for.
 

maltrout512

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Dominion":1oqat3f8 said:
For framing out use smooth 90's, I tend to find the Paslode doesn't quite have the power to drive 90mm ring shanks reliably, hit a knot or a harder bit and you can get a nasty kickback.

Anything under 90mm though and ring shanks are the nails to go for.
Disagree with smooth 90,s for framing (building regs) and if you hit a hard knot (can't get much harder than that) you will get a kick back regardless of which nailer, type nail, ring or smooth, length of nails you are using. Need to cut the timber so you don't get any knots where you want to nail then no kick back.
 

Dominion

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Cut the timber so there are no knots where you need to nail? What are you using for framing?!

It's not just knots, obviously you'd do your best to nail around them, ringed 90's in a gas nailer are a pain and I've yet to be pulled up for using smooth or seen ring nails required in a specification.
 

lincs1963

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I have been using the iM90 for the last couple of years and have found it to be considerably more powerful than the iM350, the only drawback is that you are restricted to genuine paslode nails.
 

hunggaur

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what are the other brands like such as Hitach, matika etc.

which offers the best value for money v performance.

cheers jon
 

Dominion

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The Paslodes are the market leaders for a reason, as long as they are serviced regularly they are very reliable.

I haven't used the Makita but have used the Hitachi and never got on with that at all, seemed bulkier and prone to misfires. Bostitch do one as well, their 16g finish nailer is a nice little tool.
 
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