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By Phlebas
#1344092
With no fanfare, here is an unnecessarily detailed write-up on the fourth (yes, get that, the fourth) dovetailed box I have made. And this time it’s a hardwood. Well, oak.

So, as the late Keith Floyd would say, a quick spin around the ingredients:
Oak box 1 compressed.jpg

Flooring offcuts (I think they were the sample bits) from a flooring showroom. Solid oak, but grooved on one side, and with a pretty nasty finish on the other. Plus tongue and groove on two sides. And at best about 200mm long. Oh, and some knots, or character as I would call it.

But with a gay insouciance, scrub/jack plane and Eng vs SA on the DAB (stored on computer for when I had the time. Umm, actually, I listened to it live too) we swiftly arrive at:
Oak box 2 compressed.jpg

And grooved
Oak box 3 compressed.jpg

Now, if I may a digression on the groove thingy to hold the bottom of a box. The previous through dovetail box I made had a stopped groove. That was a bit of a faff to do with hand tools.

Mitres would hide the groove, but they seem to me to be less fun than other alternatives. And apparently are quite difficult. With hand tools, anyway.

So I did a rebate that took the groove out of the equation on the shorter sides. Comme ca. Although the camera seems to make the wood surfaces a wee bit skanky. Inside face anyway, to be lined, so doesn’t matter .
Oak box 4 compressed.jpg

So we have the kit of parts.
Oak box 5 compressed.jpg

And glued up.
Oak box 6 compressed.jpg

And planed down. Unforgiving these cameras, but I think I’m getting the idea of this dovetail stuff.
Oak box 8 compressed.jpg

Polished with linseed and wax.
Oak box 9 compressed.jpg

And then lined with veggie suede. Or cloth as it is known.
Oak box 10 compressed.jpg

Oak box 12 compressed.jpg

Acceptable, I think. I may enter it in the village show. D.v., obviously.
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By thetyreman
#1344095
nicely done =D> I like the linings, is that suede? also like the mitred lipping on the lid, that's a nice touch, dovetails look very tight, can't see any gaps at all.
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By AndyT
#1344096
Excellent!

I've looked at similar sample bits and mentally made boxes from them, so it's extra nice to see it done for real.

And that's a really neat trick for hiding the groove on the ends. I can't remember it being suggested anywhere else, not even by people who advocate a similar rebate to locate the dovetails snugly. So I shall file that idea for future use, thank you.

Down here the spring weather is too good to miss but I may be back in the workshop as soon as it turns wet or windy again.
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By MikeG.
#1344097
Very nice! The joints look great.

Now you're getting good at these, maybe start slimming things down a bit. Thinner stock for the sides etc. It doesn't make anything more difficult, unless you are planing stock down by hand (and even that's not a big deal).
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By Phlebas
#1344219
thetyreman wrote:nicely done =D> I like the linings, is that suede? also like the mitred lipping on the lid, that's a nice touch, dovetails look very tight, can't see any gaps at all.


Thank you.

It's not actually suede, but a textile. Looks and feels remakebly like suede and the sales assistant in Remnant Kings where I got it referred to it as vegetarian suede.

The mitred lipping just seemed to me to be the best way to do it.
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By Phlebas
#1344220
AndyT wrote:Excellent!

I've looked at similar sample bits and mentally made boxes from them, so it's extra nice to see it done for real.

And that's a really neat trick for hiding the groove on the ends. I can't remember it being suggested anywhere else, not even by people who advocate a similar rebate to locate the dovetails snugly. So I shall file that idea for future use, thank you.

Down here the spring weather is too good to miss but I may be back in the workshop as soon as it turns wet or windy again.


Thank you.

I found the oak from the samples quite different to work with compared to the pine I've used previously. Much less forgiving, albeit easier to chisel across the end grain without tearing chunks out.

And I'm sure the rebate to hide the grooves is not an original idea - if it is it would be the first one I've had since the 1990s.
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By Phlebas
#1344226
MikeG. wrote:Very nice! The joints look great.

Now you're getting good at these, maybe start slimming things down a bit. Thinner stock for the sides etc. It doesn't make anything more difficult, unless you are planing stock down by hand (and even that's not a big deal).


Thank you.

Thinner sides for aesthetics or economy in the use of materials? I suppose someone like William Morris would say those are the same things.

And yes, it is all done by hand. But most operations on something of this size are manageable.
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By woodbloke66
#1344842
Nice box, well executed =D> From my limited experience of oak flooring timber, it's always kiln dried and has all the 'life' sucked out of it; as a consequence I found it really awful stuff to try and work with. If you have a chance to grab some properly kilned (a rarity these days) or even better, air dried oak you'll find there's there's a vast difference in the way they behave - Rob
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By woodbloke66
#1344924
Blackswanwood wrote:When you say properly kilned Rob what do you mean? Is it just dried more slowly rather than "baked"?

'Baked' would be closer. It appears to have been kilned to such an extent that the wood feels 'carroty' to such an extent that it's almost impossible to plane the stuff. Difficult to explain but if you ever come across a piece of oak with no 'life' in it, you'll see exactly what I mean.
Some years ago I recollect I made a small box for my brother which was absolutely impossible to plane so the only way I could clean it up after jointing was to start with 60 or 80g paper and work down the grades. Nightmare - Rob
By Blackswanwood
#1344936
woodbloke66 wrote:
Blackswanwood wrote:When you say properly kilned Rob what do you mean? Is it just dried more slowly rather than "baked"?

'Baked' would be closer. It appears to have been kilned to such an extent that the wood feels 'carroty' to such an extent that it's almost impossible to plane the stuff. Difficult to explain but if you ever come across a piece of oak with no 'life' in it, you'll see exactly what I mean.
Some years ago I recollect I made a small box for my brother which was absolutely impossible to plane so the only way I could clean it up after jointing was to start with 60 or 80g paper and work down the grades. Nightmare - Rob


Thanks - sounds like something to definitely avoid. I have noticed how much easier air dried oak is to work with hand tools than kiln dried. I live a couple of villages away from the Robert Thompson Mouseman workshop and museum and was put on to trying it after talking to one of their guys.
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By Phlebas
#1346174
woodbloke66 wrote:Nice box, well executed =D> From my limited experience of oak flooring timber, it's always kiln dried and has all the 'life' sucked out of it; as a consequence I found it really awful stuff to try and work with. If you have a chance to grab some properly kilned (a rarity these days) or even better, air dried oak you'll find there's there's a vast difference in the way they behave - Rob


Very kind of you Woodbloke66.

Well, I certainly found it different to work with, but, as I said, almost all of my previous botchery has been in pine. I found it more brittle, if that is the word, and hard to plane around the knots, but I had put that down to my lack of ability.

I'll try some real oak next if I can get some.
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By Phlebas
#1346177
Hornbeam wrote:Nice box. I like the lining and the contrast with the oak


Thank you.

The lining contrast is purely serendipitous (I'm sure I've spelled that wrong), as it was what I had to hand. Still, the recipient seems to like it, albeit only having seen it in photographs so far due to current restrictions.