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By MikeG.
#1260557
Possibly later this year I want to build a big pedestal dining table and 10 chairs, in oak. The ensemble is to be in a Jacobean/ Tudor/ whatever sort-of style. I'm happy with the chairs, but I can't make up my mind on the pedestal design. Here are some of the options I am contemplating:

Image

The criteria I am looking at include not having a single post in the middle so that those sitting at the ends of the table can put their feet on the foot. Before you get too excited, option E is not turned, but cut out with 4 "flat" identical faces. Options F and G have stopped chamfers, possibly aggressive enough that the bulk of the legs are octagonal, and the cross bar could be either pegged or through tenoned into them.

So, whaddya think? Which one should I go for, or what would you change on any of the choices? If you don't like any, I've got approx 20 others to choose from......
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By woodbloke66
#1260571
Unless I'm missing something Mike, the end elevations on A,B,C & D all look to be the same? - Rob
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By MikeG.
#1260574
woodbloke66 wrote:Unless I'm missing something Mike, the end elevations on A,B,C & D all look to be the same? - Rob


:)..........yeah, you're missing something Rob..... :lol:
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By Droogs
#1260575
@ woodbloke66 the top of the leg arcs are different

My choice is B
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By woodbloke66
#1260618
MikeG. wrote:
woodbloke66 wrote:Unless I'm missing something Mike, the end elevations on A,B,C & D all look to be the same? - Rob


:)..........yeah, you're missing something Rob..... :lol:


:lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:...need to go to Specsavers :lol: - Rob
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By Bm101
#1260623
I like D. I think I might reverse the arc of the smaller curve (the one that is the same in all A - D designs) so that it flatters the curve on the underside of the table top. Either solid or as a curved framing brace type affair to echo the house.
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By MikeG.
#1260629
galleywood wrote:+1 for D.
When does the 'vote' close?
How much weight will the votes carry when you make your decision?


Vote closes when I start work on the project. I'm actually as interested in the comments as the votes, although it is interesting that most people seem to be favouring the curved stuff in the top row (ie not classic Jacobean/ Tudor).

WIP please.


You can rely on that.
Last edited by MikeG. on 07 Jan 2019, 09:42, edited 1 time in total.
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By MikeG.
#1260630
If it helps get the picture of the overall feel I am after, here is the current state of play with the chairs:

Image

The dentil-like design at the top rail is actually likely to be a thumbnail carving as per the seat-support rails, but I got lazy with my drawing.
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By custard
#1260644
One guideline for chairs is that they're an awful lot easier to use if they're 5kg or less, in particular children, infirm or elderly users find it more difficult to move their chair inboard of the table as the chair's weight increases. Made from Oak I think these chairs will be well over this guideline.

If your diners are all hale and hearty then of course this is a non-issue, but I thought I'd flag it in case they're not. There's a restaurant near me that has this style of chair throughout, it also attracts an older clientele. Not a good combination as the waiters are run ragged helping the diners move their chairs in and out every time they want to get up or sit back down.

Another point. The table designs (apart from maybe E) look like they're solidly in the gothic revival tradition, so mainstream Arts and Crafts. But the chairs are different in that they look like the bastardised "Jacobethan" designs that were popular during the inter war period. Add in some barley twist turning and they'd be spot on!

It's not me who has to live with them so my opinion counts for nil, but I find they don't sit that well together.

And a final point, you can pick up large sets of very well made, 1930's "Jacobethan" Oak chairs, for an absolute song at local auctions or on Ebay. Making chairs always eat up loads more time than you expect, so that could save hundreds of hours of work. Especially as the chair seats should really slope down towards the back, if not the sitter will tend to slide out of them. That one change will add a lot of work and complicate the build quite a lot. This will be especially so in this case as you'll likely end up with cushions on them for comfort, and cushions are even slippier!
By katellwood
#1260647
The issue I would have with D is that the A frame that is formed by the legs, at the top there is a likelihood that the top joint would be prone to opening up through shrinkage ( a bit like the internal corner of an architrave mitre can open up if the timber shrinks) and form a tapered gap

The same could be said for G