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Woodworking bible?

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Andrewbullie

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Hi all, I was wondering, is there a really good comprehensive book which details everything about wood working. Such as pro's and con's of timber type, different joints, techniques, tool suggestions etc? I know most hobbies have a favoured book which people often ever to as the bible!

Many thanks

Andrew
 

undergroundhunter

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I like The Practical Woodworker by Bernard E Jones, I have the 4 volume edition printed in 1937. For me its about as comprehensive as you can get.

Matt
 

AndyT

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No there isn't.

The range of subjects it would need to cover is too vast. In no particular order it would need to cover:

- timber biology, types, distribution and processing
- carpentry inc housebuilding, floors, roofs, shuttering, formwork
- joinery inc doors, windows
- cabinetmaking
- boatbuilding
- musical instrument making
- turning
- carving
- marquetry, parquetry, intarsia, veneering
- fretwork
- staining, finishing, polishing
- hand tools
- power tools

And cover all the above across the world and through the last few thousand years.

I suggest you build a large bookcase and start collecting!
 

bugbear

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Otto":1cxb8apj said:
George Ellis, Modern Practical Joinery
I think there's a generally accepted sequence of bibles, starting with the one you mention.

The next was "Modern Cabinet Work, Furniture and Fitments" by Hooper and Wells.

This lasted a long time, only really being superceded by Joyce, "The Technique of Furniture Making", which
(in revised form) is probably the current bible.

BugBear
 

Phil Pascoe

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I have Ellis and Joyce - I would think Joyce to be slightly more appropriate to today's woodworking. I picked up one at a boot sale for 50p, but I had the same edition already.
 

KevM

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AndyT

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KevM":1k47m0v8 said:
If anybody wants a read of 'Modern Practical Joinery' by George Ellis it's available here for free: http://www.wkfinetools.com/wWorking/z_r ... oinery.asp (Click on the red download square near the top right of the page for the pdf download)

There's a host of other publications listed here: http://www.wkfinetools.com/mLibrary/mLi ... ndex-1.asp and http://www.wkfinetools.com/mLibrary/mLi ... ndex-2.asp

... all these and many more can be explored from the sticky https://www.ukworkshop.co.uk/forums...rking-books-plans-reference-sites-t59067.html

Did anyone mention that there is too much for any one book to be comprehensive? :wink:
 

Benchwayze

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AndyT":1v3c6dlv said:
No there isn't.

The range of subjects it would need to cover is too vast. In no particular order it would need to cover:

I suggest you build a large bookcase and start collecting!
+1

Just like most of us on UKW have done. (Well, I have some of the books, but have yet to make the bookcase. Until now, Spur Shelving in my spare room has been adequate!) :D
 

Benchwayze

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You can't sit down in your favourite armchair, pipe and slippers, with YouTube; not in quite the same way at least!
I tried it. The Misuss said it's like being in a room with a robot! :mrgreen:
 

Grahamshed

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yes but, a picture in the hand is worth two in the bush.




<what am I drivelling on about ? >
 

bugbear

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bugbear":108xoyvy said:
Otto":108xoyvy said:
George Ellis, Modern Practical Joinery
I think there's a generally accepted sequence of bibles, starting with the one you mention.

The next was "Modern Cabinet Work, Furniture and Fitments" by Hooper and Wells.

This lasted a long time, only really being superceded by Joyce, "The Technique of Furniture Making", which
(in revised form) is probably the current bible.

BugBear

Recently, whilst reading a newly acquired Woodworker annual
(1952) I found a review of the new 6th edition, which made
interesting reading on the biblical status of editions 1-5.


It was some 43 years ago that the original work
was published, when it rapidly established itself
and the foremost book on the subject, and literally
became the "Cabinet-maker's Bible." There was
no other book in its class available, and its value to
both student and tradesman was at once realised.
With a few minor alterations and additions it continued
until the fifth edition of 1938. It was then
realised that, although most of the general practice
was sound, it did not include the many developments
which recent years had brought, and some of the
designs had dated. The time for a complete revision
had come, but the outbreak of war made this impossible.
Now Mr. Hooper has been able to complete his great
task, and we are able to welcome an old friend
in completely new array.

We should like heartily to congratulate the author
on his achievement. This new edition seem even
fuller of information than the original work, and it
includes a great mass of new designs, as well as
some of the traditional designs which the years do
not alter.

Taking briefly the chapters, there is an introduction
in which modern technique is explained, and one on
shaping, forming and veneering. There follows a
large section of furniture types - bedroom furniture,
dining and sitting room items, tables, cabinets of all
kinds, clockcases, chairs, and utility furnture. There
are also sections on church furniture and panelling.
Drawing is an important section, as might be
imagined, and includes elevations, perspective,
geometry, and the general practice of a drawing office.
Other sectionss are on joints and their application,
the various veneering processes, metal fittings, and
so on.

The book measure 10 in. by 7 in. and includes
some 378 pages of general text and illustrations, and
nearly 60 photographic plates, and a large number
of special folding plates of designs of various kinds,
details of joints etc. There are also some coloured
plates. It is well printed and has an attractive blue
binding.

We anticipate a great future for the book, and
we recommend it to all men in the trade, whether
as students, instructors, draughsmen, foremen, or
craftsman at the bench. Published at £2 10s net by
B.T. Batsford Ltd., 15 North Audley Street, London
W.1.


It may be noted that some glowing reviews in Woodworker
may be a "tad" influenced by many of the book sharing a
publisher (Evans) with the magazine, but that is not
the case here.

BugBear
 

Jelly

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Grahamshed":3e3kp1n4 said:
I think a lot of these sort of things have been overtaken by Youtube.
Not to put too fine a point on it, they haven't and they won't be...

Now if someone put together a highly detailed website on woodworking, that might well incorporate videos and interactive components, that would be a serious challenge to these kind of semi-comprehnsive books; but video alone? Nah.
 

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