Woodwork eye protection safety glasses

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Glenhyrst

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Looking to renew my safety glasses and bemused by complexity of classification and price ranges.

But to pick on one quality, the F (low energy impact rating - small object impacts at up to 45m/sec) or B (medium energy impact rating - small object impacts at up to 120m/sec), which should one choose?

Thanks.
 
More than anything, I'd pick a reputable brand because they will be properly compliant and tested. And I'd pick for comfort.
Uvex and Bollé could be places to start.
 
You could also use a quality face shield in conjunction with your chosen eye protection more being better than less . I would also go with the highest safety rating combined with @Sideways suggestion re : what is comfortable to wear long term . If they are comfortable you are less likely to remove them ..
 
I bought these for cycling. They mean I can read my phone and cycling computer without having to change glasses. They cost £9.99
 

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Thanks for the responses but I see no answer to my question which was “the F (low energy impact rating - small object impacts at up to 45m/sec) or B (medium energy impact rating - small object impacts at up to 120m/sec), which should one choose?”

I see references to comfort and so many advertised for sale seem of the “designer” type for cycling/sports. UV protection doesn’t have much of a place in my workshop.

The B rated glasses seem all to have headband which I suppose is to be expected but I tend to take the glasses on and off between machine and bench and would find this irksome. And same objection to a faceshield.

I suspect I’m overthinking this and will carry on with the F rated jobbies for the time being.
 
Thanks for the responses but I see no answer to my question which was “the F (low energy impact rating - small object impacts at up to 45m/sec) or B (medium energy impact rating - small object impacts at up to 120m/sec), which should one choose?”

I see references to comfort and so many advertised for sale seem of the “designer” type for cycling/sports. UV protection doesn’t have much of a place in my workshop.

The B rated glasses seem all to have headband which I suppose is to be expected but I tend to take the glasses on and off between machine and bench and would find this irksome. And same objection to a faceshield.

I suspect I’m overthinking this and will carry on with the F rated jobbies for the time being.
I have the bolle trackers Bolle Tracker II Clear Lens Safety Specs - Screwfix (although mine are amber). They do come with a strap but can be used like normal glasses. I use them for biking also. They are very good at not steaming up.

F is not good enough for things like angle grinders, as they could lose a blade at 8k+ rpm. Chainsaws have quite a high chain speed also. Routers are also high speed. Things like a pillar drill are likely a lower speed and wouldn't need more than F, although better to go higher and not need it.

The bolle trackers are grade B so you know you are covered for the higher speed tools.

Edit - adding a source for my assertation above Guidance on selecting most suitable safety eyewear who state the use of B rated for angle grinders and nail guns as an example.
 
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Simple(pessimistic?) answer, evaluate [guess] the worst case for the equipment you have / use and buy for that?
Nothing worse than wishing you'd spent £x more for the higher spec glasses, laid there with an eye patch on?
 
Thanks for the responses but I see no answer to my question which was “the F (low energy impact rating - small object impacts at up to 45m/sec) or B (medium energy impact rating - small object impacts at up to 120m/sec), which should one choose?”

I see references to comfort and so many advertised for sale seem of the “designer” type for cycling/sports. UV protection doesn’t have much of a place in my workshop.

The B rated glasses seem all to have headband which I suppose is to be expected but I tend to take the glasses on and off between machine and bench and would find this irksome. And same objection to a faceshield.

I suspect I’m overthinking this and will carry on with the F rated jobbies for the time being.
For what it's worth, when you start using higher energy tools (lathe work, milling, angle grinder or wire brushes) a good face shield starts to feel very much worthwhile. Optrel clearmaxx is very high quality and the Honeywell bionic design is also much better than a basic cheapie from from screwfix or axminster. Wire wheels throw wires all the time and grinding / cutting wheels shatter. I'd never use one of those without a full face shield.
 
Any item whose shape / speed are greater than your specs are rated for?


Such as ? :)

Admit it Dave you cant think of an example :LOL: , which is why you are answering a question with a question.

Low speed is 45/m/s which is 100 mph. This rating is recommended for all woodworking applications as well as cutting, grinding, shaving of both wood and metal.
They are recommended for use in schools and colleges, as well as industrial settings.

Just because something says its the basic, does not mean under any circumstances that they are poorly designed or not for use in general areas such as woodworking, routing, wood-lathe or any other application found in this industry.
 
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Such as ? :)

Admit it Dave you cant think of an example :LOL: , which is why you are answering a question with a question.

Low speed is 45/m/s which is 100 mph. This rating is recommended for all woodworking applications as well as cutting, grinding, shaving of both wood and metal.
They are recommended for use in schools and colleges, as well as industrial settings.

Just because something says its the basic, does not mean under any circumstances that they are poorly designed or not for use in general areas such as woodworking, routing, wood-lathe or any other application found in this industry.
Keep in mind though that the specifications use a 6mm ball bearing weighing 0.86g . A greater weight projectile could exceed the strength rating even if not travelling faster than 45m/s. It's shape could also effect the damaged e.g a pointed object would have more piercing power - the edge of a shattered grinder disc for example.

I haven't checked all of the B-rated glasses but the bolle trackers I have for example also have a foam surround to fit closely to the face. I've had a few hits behind my glasses when using more typical safety glasses even though they are wrap around there is still a gap things can bounce through. Most often when using grinders. Also better for keeping out dust.

I do wear the lower rated ones quite regularly as I leave enough around that I always have some level of eye protection on hand for things like drilling. If I'm using grinders I've taken to wearing better rated ones now.

With a wood lathe where there is possibility for a large piece of wood to hit me in the face I wear a face shield.

The bolle trackers are £12 which is pretty cheap to not have to think too hard about it and covers most uses.
 
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Health and safety in the UK is pretty stringent, so Im more than sure safety glasses designed for use in schools and colleges are more than up to the tasks they come into contact with.

We cant start using any old argument as a way of saying 'oh but what about' if the thing flying through the air is bigger, heavier,sharper, in which case the application has changed and the correct rated safety glasses would be in use there.
For example in a metal foundry where hot metal splashes are the thing the safety wear is guarding against. In woodworking, the HSE says B grade is fit for the job.
Sure you can go higher grades if you want to, but that doesn't mean the lesser grades are unsuitable.
 
Health and safety in the UK is pretty stringent, so Im more than sure safety glasses designed for use in schools and colleges are more than up to the tasks they come into contact with.

We cant start using any old argument as a way of saying 'oh but what about' if the thing flying through the air is bigger, heavier,sharper, in which case the application has changed and the correct rated safety glasses would be in use there.
For example in a metal foundry where hot metal splashes are the thing the safety wear is guarding against. In woodworking, the HSE says B grade is fit for the job.
Sure you can go higher grades if you want to, but that doesn't mean the lesser grades are unsuitable.
Well yes, the specifications are there for you to make a decision based on what you are doing. If you are doing something that could result in being hit by something bigger than a 6mm object at 45m/s then get a better grade set of glasses or face shield. Or get grade B for pretty much the same price and worry less about it.

'In woodworking, the HSE says B grade is fit for the job'
Did you mean grade B (120m/s) ? as this is not the basic F rated (45m/s) level of a lot of cheap safety specs in schools etc that I thought was being discussed and being said as suitable.

I worked in a secondary school and 6th form for 18m and I don't remember seeing any high speed tool that was allowed to be used by the students so F rated specs are fine in that situation.
I never used a 9inch angle grinder when I was at school though, perhaps they are used for certain courses? You also have to factor in doing dumb stuff that can't quite be done neatly on a bench, like trying to grind off a nut whilst half way under a car which is likely to put you in closer proximity to the danger.

At the end of the day it is 'personal protective equipment' and in your own house/garage you can do what you want. As long as the safety equipment doesn't start causing a safety issue in itself (steaming up of masks so you can't see etc) then choosing slightly higher rated specs isn't going to be a problem or cost much difference, if any.

Safety glasses also don't stop you being punched in the face by half a flying bowl from a lathe so its horses for courses and you are better off with a facemask in that instance.
 

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