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Mrs C

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Has anyone got any words of wisdom for trimming glue on ash edge stripping? It’s going onto 18mm ash faced mdf.

Where I can trim in the grain direction it’s fine, but just on the bit where the grain changes I am getting tiny bits of tear out, enough to feel under your finger and just about see. Have tried several ways of doing it and blades are sharp.

Help, or do I just need to get the touch up crayons out?

Thanks
 

Steve Maskery

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I'm currently making the lipping to do this very same job, only mine is oak.

How are you doing it? If you are using a block plane or similar, I'm not surprised you are getting tearout, it is almost inevitable, unless you have some very compliant wood.

My preferred way is with a router. Like this:
https://www.woodcraft.com/blog_entries/ ... outer-jigs

You will need to scroll about 3/4 way down.
 

Phil Pascoe

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It also helps if you can finish one edge as perfectly as you can and very carefully glue it a few thou high, leaving any overhang to be trimmed on the unseen (or less often seen) side. A bit of a faff but it helps if you've a bit of wild grain .......... which of course is best avoided in the first place. :D
If you have a router, fine - be careful setting it though - you've only about half a millimetre tbetween you and the MDF.
 

Steve Maskery

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Good point, Phil.
I set mine with the base firmly on a flat surface. Then put a piece of paper up to it and lower the cutter. The paper must not go under the jig itself, just under the cutter. So now the cutter is a paper thickness above the workpiece, leaving the tiniest bit to sand off.
 

Setch

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I had an inkling it was.

A perfect edge is difficult, I tend to get very close with a block plane then use a scraper or file, or sandpaper and a hard block to final finish.

The grain in iron on edging is all over the place, which can make it a mare to work with, I use solid timber instead whenever possible.
 

Rorschach

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For melamine/man made materials I use a block plane and then a file. For real wood I use a large paring chisel and take my time. Block plane will cause tearout if you are not careful, chisel will not as you are slicing perpendicular to the edging. 320grit or higher paper glued to a hard block to finish.
 

Mrs C

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Steve Maskery":2dodhqwq said:
I'm currently making the lipping to do this very same job, only mine is oak.

How are you doing it? If you are using a block plane or similar, I'm not surprised you are getting tearout, it is almost inevitable, unless you have some very compliant wood.

My preferred way is with a router. Like this:
https://www.woodcraft.com/blog_entries/ ... outer-jigs

You will need to scroll about 3/4 way down.
This jig works a treat, thank you. I had previously tried a router with a bearing, but the results were a bit random!

Cheers :)
 
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