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Blackswanwood

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I am looking at investing in a circular saw for use with a timber framing project. Last time I cut it all by hand but am getting too old for that! Has anyone any experience of the Makita 5008 or any other recommendations? In general it seems reviews on Bosch saws are a few notches below Makita ... any advice welcome.

Thanks
 

PaulR

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Blackswanwood":1r9434f6 said:
I am looking at investing in a circular saw for use with a timber framing project. Last time I cut it all by hand but am getting too old for that! Has anyone any experience of the Makita 5008 or any other recommendations? In general it seems reviews on Bosch saws are a few notches below Makita ... any advice welcome.

Thanks
I had the Makita for years and it was great. Only replaced to upgrade to a Tracksaw


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Hlsmith

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I bought the big erbauer one as I needed to cut tenons in 100mm oak for a bar I made and it worked very well powerful motor and the blade was good enough for what I used it for
I didn't want to spend much as the rest of the time I think it's to big for cutting sheet goods
 

Inspector

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I have a Milwaukee 8 1/4" version that I got in the late 80's and it's still going strong. It is a heavy beast if you are doing any cuts that are overhead or vertical though. Any saw in the same general size range from a decent maker will last a long time. It comes down to finer points like how it feels in hand and where adjustments are made. Best if you can is to play with them in the store to see what you like. I have a buddy with the 16" Makita if you really want to go big. :wink:

Pete
 

Aquachiefofficer

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I've owned a Makita 5008 for about 5 years. I think I paid £150 for it. It's been faultless and feels right in your hand. I'm only a hobbyist but it's done a fair amount of work. If an 8" saw is enough for your needs I'd recommend it. I've only one small criticism and that's about the length of the fence:- it only allows a maximum distance from the edge of the workpiece of 8cm, but I suppose if you're into metalwork it wouldn't be too hard to make a longer one.
Regards, Paul
 

Inspector

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:?: How would a 4" saw compare in any way to an 8" or 8 1/4" saw the OP is looking for? I have one and it is handy for doing a little cut where access with a big one won't do or a small short cut in the middle of a sheet but for serious work (hammer) it is a toy. Even cutting at full depth from both sides it doesn't cut as deep as an 8 1/4" from one side.

Pete

Looks like in the time it took me to respond to a post it was removed.
 

Pete Maddex

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I have a Makita 5703 which I always had problems with it straight when following a straight edge, turns out the base was 1mm out from the blade, a bit of filing and a washer sorted it out and now to works fine.
It doesn't get used much as I have s track saw.

Pete
 

AJB Temple

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I do a lot of DIY timber framing. In an ideal world I would use a 16" or 12" Grizzly (not available over here in UK) or 12" Makita. This is because when you are cutting the ends off 6" beams or dimensioning on trestles, one of these will do it in 2 cuts. Since I don't live in tool heaven what I actually use is a 110v Hilti WSC85. Bought it from a timber framer here actually.

If you intend to do any serious amount of framing, the standard workshop Makita and that ilk will bog down. This is not what you want in large dimension timber when you are frequently working at the limit of the saw, as it feels unsafe.

There are lots of Hilti's around used. I have Makita and Skill (never used after Hilti arrived) and for dimensioning boards a top notch Mafell track saw. For serious timber work the Hilti beats the others hands down. Good dust clearance, motor never falters, runs straight and true, very heavy duty.

If you live anywhere near Tunbridge Wells you are welcome to come and look at what I use, including the slicks, chain morticer etc.
 

Blackswanwood

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I bought a Makita 5903 in the end and it has coped okay. The point made in the previous post though that something slightly bigger would be better is definitely true.

I nearly bought a chain morticer on eBay but couldn’t quite convince myself ... I wish I had as drilling/chopping mortices by hand is hard work! Axminster sell some all steel chisels for framing which were a good investment.
 

AJB Temple

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Chopping mortices by hand is OK if you drill out the waste first - if they are not too big I will tend to do that as to be quite frank, I find my chain morticer scary.
 
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