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Saint Simon

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I apologise for posting this blindingly obvious note but I have seen the light this week, or a least a little bit of it, and although it only goes to show how daft I am I need to share it!
As a rather slow chap I have been mindlessly following the plane number rules of no.4 smoother, no 5 jack etc. And then I read something from Chris Schwartz that woke me from my stupidity. On small components its ok, ie won't lead to excommunication, to use a smaller plane to take off real amounts of wood. Instead of unsuccessfully trying to balance my 5 1/2 on a 300 x 30mm component its a good idea to open the mouth of my no4 and take off real thick shavings. I did, it worked, and no wobble. Revelation!
Sorry, but I do feel better for sharing that.
Simon
 

AndyT

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Well said.

I learnt it a different way - for years, all I had was no 4, so it had to do for everything.

I have since managed to acquire "rather more than one" plane, which is of course justified by my freedom to have subtle differences of blade shape (flat, cambered, corners on, corners off) and sharpening angle etc. Sometimes the best tool is the nearest one to hand!
 

Scouse

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And don't forget the humble block plane. I often use an adjustable mouth block plane on small pieces, the adjustable mouth allows for fairly aggressive cuts with more control than I would get with a bench plane, a quick tighten and it's a mini smoother.
El.
 

tomatwark

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Scouse":nndz04yt said:
And don't forget the humble block plane. I often use an adjustable mouth block plane on small pieces, the adjustable mouth allows for fairly aggressive cuts with more control than I would get with a bench plane, a quick tighten and it's a mini smoother.
El.
I use a block plane for all sorts especially on site when I need to make an adjustment it is really handy when you are holding the piece of wood between your knees.

Tom
 

hanser

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No 3 does it for me! Mainly because its the only plane my dad had and its been passed down to me. Light enough to do fine adjustment and can do a little bit more beside.
 
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