Wadkin DS247S bandsaw

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Sam R

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Seeking collective knowledge.

There is a large Wadkin DS 247 S bandsaw for sale, with 3 phase motor. I don't have the test no. It is a big beast, but looks to be in good condition. Assuming no casting cracks, what is to look out for on something like this? It needs a bit of TLC but is not hideous in terms of rust on surfaces etc.

I have looked on the web but cannot find info on this specific model. I have email CMS in Leicester, with a view to sending it to them for a refit, but not heard back yet. The price I have been told is £350. Possibly less if the cash is shown. Thanks for any help.
 

heimlaga

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I don't know that model but here is some general bandsaw advice:

First and foremost: Look for traces of fire. Look for soot inside hard to reach cavities. A bandsaw that has been in a fire is easy to repaint anf flog to an unsuspecting buyer. A fire-damaged bandsaw is likely to have a warped frame which is disastrous. If it is fire damaged don't buy it. At least not if it costs more than 4 pounds.

You should also look at the trunnion holding the table. This is a weak spot on most bandsaws. If someone has loaded or unloaded it carelessly with the table in place something may have happened.

You should also check that the wheels are running true. Somebody may have tipped the bandsaw in the past and damaged the wheels.

Of cause you should check that the motor hasn't burned. A rewind tends to cost quite a bit. We are talking hundreds of pounds. Feasible but rather expensive.

Ball bearings are rather cheap so bad bearings aren't worth worrying for. However they may help you when haggling down the prize and of cause they need to be accounted for in the total budget.
The same thing with wheel tyres. I got mine replaced professionally for 120 euros.

Then there's the guarding question. If you are going to have employees using it you neded to make any guard that is missing to bring it up to modern standards. This is totally possible (I have done that to a 100 years old E.V.Beronius without any usable guards) but especially for very old saws it is quite a job. For a not so old saw this would involve only some tiny modifications and if you are going to use it yourself you can use it as is.
The better the guards the more it is worth. That is a rule of thumb because better guards means that it is easier to bring it up to modern standards.

The guides may or may not be some outdated design. Again this is an easy upgrade if you want.

You may want to ballance the wheels a bit better depending on the age and wheel style. Some old saws had very badly ballanced wheels. This isn't too difficult to fix at home.

I don't know the model designations but Wadkin bandsaws with cast iron frames all have a very good reputation. If you have gone through my checklist without any sisastrous finds I think it will be a pretty safe buy.
Good luck!
 

Sam R

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Thanks for the tips. I will check the issues you point out. Has anyone used CMS in Leicester for refurbs? Apparently staffed by ex-Wadkin employees, seemed like it might be a good idea to have them do any necessary work, as I'm a bit time poor.
 

wallace

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I think the wadkin DS is not a cast iron frame but one fabricated. I have experience with the DR its older brother and they are pretty bullet proof. I have heard the guys at CMS are good but I have found there spares vey expensive
 

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