Trimming formica

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busy builder

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I have been making tables for a local cafe, and I have a small problem with trimming the formica.

The tables are square and rectangular shaped, so have formica on the edges and tops. Whilst trimming with my Bosch palm router and trend trimming cutter it leaves a touch too much formica so the you can feel the edge and is not smooth. Perhaps I'm being picky as it's a very small amount. The cutter is new.

At the moment I'm using a small block plane very carefully shaving the last little bit off, and a file to do the sides, but this is not ideal.

any ideas on best way to trim the formica ?
 
Are you using a straight cutter or bevelled cutter or rounded cutter?
I tend to use a rounded/ bevelled cutter set very close to the face and then run a file along the edge just to finish off.
 
I've not needed to do this myself, but according to Robert Wearing, writing when Formica was more popular, a good way to trim it is to use a plane with the blade reground so that it presents an edge to the work at a much higher angle - around 85 -90°.
 
AndyT":1vin4dal said:
I've not needed to do this myself, but according to Robert Wearing, writing when Formica was more popular, a good way to trim it is to use a plane with the blade reground so that it presents an edge to the work at a much higher angle - around 85 -90°.

I've always used an old Stanley #60 1/2 block plane with the blade honed to a very steep angle, but it needs to be very sharp.

Cheers :wink:

Paul
 
I have had the same problem.
I have made a lot of laminated furniture, My workshop is a cold and damp pig shed..
So when I take the laminated (usually birch ply) furniture indoors into the warm I think the ply shrinks a little and can leave the formica slightly proud, even though I routed, sanded, planed flush when made.
Maybe a bevelled router trimmer is the answer, any suggestions?

thanks
 
davin":2gh3gvkd said:
I have had the same problem.
I have made a lot of laminated furniture, My workshop is a cold and damp pig shed..
So when I take the laminated (usually birch ply) furniture indoors into the warm I think the ply shrinks a little and can leave the formica slightly proud, even though I routed, sanded, planed flush when made.
Maybe a bevelled router trimmer is the answer, any suggestions?

thanks

I think you have answered your own question. Assuming that you can't make the pig shed warm and dry, postpone the final trimming until the work has stabilised indoors.
 
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