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Tormek wet grinder

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desmoengine

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hi all
ive just got my late xmas pressy tormek 2006, any hoo i have a ? or three for any users out there:-
should one drain out the water bath for storage between uses? or not as case may be.
the manual talks of impregnating the honing wheel with compound. if this is absorbed into the leather ,it appears to dry out to a powder residew after 24hrs, can this be reactivtaed or is it a case of applying honing compound at each use?
the manual also indicates the application of oil to the honing wheel leather should this be applied regularly or as a one off ?

looking forward to responses

Dave W
 

woodshavings

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Any water left in the trough will evaporate after a few days if your workshop is heated - I tend to top it up as necessary then clean it out every month or so.
With regard to the leather wheel , I used 3 in 1 oil and occasionally remoisten it when it dries out. I smear a little of the compound on the wheel after 3 or 4 sharpening sessions but it really depends on how much you use it

HTH

John
 

Noel

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I personally drain the trough after use. No reason other than it seems best. Obviously when you go to fill it again it takes alot of water as the stone absorbs about 4 times the volume of the trough. I think the instructions do indicate that it should be emptied or else I've read it someshere else. In any case you will find after an hour or so of use that the trough does become thick with slurry and this tends to congeal over time.

Rgds

Noel
 

Alf

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Not a Tormek owner, but it occurs to me that possibly the wheel might be vulnerable to frost, just like waterstones. Anything in the manual suggesting that? Just thought I'd mention it, bearing in mind the approaching cold snap (at least it's still approaching here, but it may already be with some of you)

Cheers, Alf
 

woodshavings

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Yes, the manual is very specific about NOT letting the wheel freeze. You should not leave your Tormek in an unheated workshop in the winter.
 

Cutting Crew

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Hi All,

A simple but effective tip I picked up a couple of years back is to add a piece of magnetic material (often used for signs on the sides of taxis etc) into the bottom of the Tormek trough. This appears to attract the fine metal grindings from the water and stops them getting back onto the wheel.

I also use a pink wheel in the grinder as well, they seem a little coarser than the Tormek supplied one, they cut quicker and last longer. This probably wouldn't apply in a woodworking shop as turning tools, gouges in particular tend to cause dishing in the wheels.

Regards....Mike
 

Digizz

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I was looking at one of these in my local retailer - they were VERY categorical that the water should be emptied and not left in when storing as they say they've had a few people complain that the wheel becomes 'eliptical' in shape which is obviously not good. If left in one place, one part of the wheel absorbs water and the top dries out!
 

desmoengine

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digizz
useful note thanks for posting
the wet tank can be lifted down from working position, but i have note observed much water driping out of wheel into it to
dave w
 

Dewy

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Like Cutting Crew said, a small magnet in the water trough will pick up any steel ground off the tools.
The last thing you want is small grindings ruining the finish you have been putting on your tools.
Just make sure the magnet can't be touched by the wheel.
The action of grinding can often magnetise a tool & for this reason engineering shops have a demagnetiser by grinders.
 

desmoengine

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yes magnet to collect grindings,
ive mine on the outside of the water bath held on with duck tape. makes for easy clean out just a mound of metal particles at the bottom outside surface wipped out with a paper towel after tipping out water.
dave w
 
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