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tite-mark gauge details req'd please

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bugbear

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Can anyone tell me:

* how much the cutting edge of this gauge projects beyond the shaft (which translates as the deepest cut it can make, of course)

* what the bevel angle on the cutting wheel is? (looks around 35-40 degree on photos)

BugBear
 

MikeW

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Hi BB,

Depends on which wheels are attached.

The large, single wheel that attaches to the beam's end is about .150

The small, single wheel that attaches to the beam's end is about .040

The larger, mortise wheels that slide on the beam itself is a collar that is about .10 thick and the cutter proper is another .070

The beam is about .30

Angle. Hard to measure. The largest angle is on the large wheel. The others are shallower. I would estimate the large at 35*.

Take all this with somewhat a grain of salt. I used a dial caliper and just held the cutters up to the light and eyeballed when edge of the collars and end of the cutters have been reached.
 
A

Anonymous

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Uh oh! I sense a "poor man's" titemark coming! :lol:
 

bugbear

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Roger Nixon":2olj7s89 said:
Uh oh! I sense a "poor man's" titemark coming! :lol:
Already done:

http://www.wdynamic.com/galoots/4images ... ge_id=2731

But I'm having new (old!) thoughts about the blade:

http://nika.frontier.iarc.uaf.edu/~cswi ... 19#message

especially:

bugbear":2olj7s89 said:
Given that a cutting gauge is used with the vertical side
of the blade facing the "keep" wood, and the bevel
on the waste side, I ground and honed a rather steep
bevel - around 30 degrees. This gives a clear, visible
line, and gives better physical feedback to control
depth of cut. The damage (i.e. the wood displacement by
the bevel side) is in the waste, and doesn't matter.
BugBear
 
A

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I remember that one. It made me take another look at the Stanley 95 butt gauge. I really like the blade shape on that one and use it often when I don't need much reach.
 

Alf

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BB, for heaven's sakes, I'm sure Helen'd buy you one - it'd save us all this suspense. :lol:

Cheers, Alf
 

bugbear

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Alf":2m30jmf2 said:
BB, for heaven's sakes, I'm sure Helen'd buy you one
Indeed. So be very quiet(*)

Actually, all I'm trying to do is work out the exact size and shape of the cut mark made by a tite mark, with a view to shaping a blade with the same properties for my cutting gauge, for comparitive purposes.

In various "working" shots the marks made look extremely clear. Either there's magic involved, or the marks are simply quite wide at the surface of the wood.

BugBear

(*) I'm hunting wabbit, obviously.
 

Alf

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bugbear":gsds29vu said:
Either there's magic involved
Well of course it's magic; why else d'you think aparently sane people pay all that for a marking gauge? :roll: #-o :wink: :lol:

Cheers, Alf
 

MikeW

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Can anyone with a tite-mark give me an accurate (dial caliper, vernier caliper, digital caliper or micrometer) diameter for the rod?
Oh, I thought I did. The beam size--the rod--is right at .30 give or take one thou.

As I've made two trips out to the cold shop I'm reluctant to go again. I'm cold and lazy. Oh, OK...

Tis really 5/16--3.125:



Now I feel we both owe each other a pint :wink:

Take care, Mike
 

MikeW

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Alf":2eylg0b0 said:
bugbear":2eylg0b0 said:
Either there's magic involved
Well of course it's magic; why else d'you think aparently sane people pay all that for a marking gauge? :roll: #-o :wink: :lol:

Cheers, Alf
And it is a magic wand...

Ok, not really. But it is a well made tool. Who doesn't like using well made tools whether craftsman made or ready-made?

I must confess. I also have bought all my planes. Even the Disston mortise gauge--and it's [mostly] made from wood!

Take care, Mike
 

Alf

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No sooner was the fly cast upon the water than up rose Mike to take a bite... :wink:

Cheers, Alf

P.S. Sorry, Mike. Teasing is practically the national sport in Cornwall, and it tends to be catching. :oops:
 

MikeW

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Teasing? Wot that?

And so was I...but, the most important part of your statement I did not respond to was the sane part--apparently or otherwise :lol:!

Mike
who's gotta work on the dry humor thing...
 

ydb1md

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bugbear":tmr3evga said:
In various "working" shots the marks made look extremely clear. Either there's magic involved, or the marks are simply quite wide at the surface of the wood.
I think there might be more at work there than just the cutter angle and depth. A wheeled cutter would leave a much smoother surface than a slitting gauge -- just by the nature of how it's leaving a mark. The smoother surface would translate to better reflection of light, less defraction and therefore a more apparent line.

Or, it's just the magic metal in the cutting wheel. :wink:
 

MikeW

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bugbear":1ue3p8fy said:
A wheeled cutter
But the wheels don't go round :shock:
BugBear
That's true on many including the TiteMark--but let's not forget the Stanley wheeled gauges.

I have a #98, but there were other models. These were made with rolling wheels.

Not as effective as far as depth, but they do work well on wood that has a tendency to make even my TiteMark pull away.

Take care, Mike
 

Chris Knight

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Come on Paul, don't be a Tite-wad, just buy the darn thing and be happy!

It marks well, it cuts well, and it looks good - plus, it is so easy to set accurately. What more do you need?
 

Philly

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waterhead37":ibnglqon said:
Come on Paul, don't be a Tite-wad, just buy the darn thing and be happy!

It marks well, it cuts well, and it looks good - plus, it is so easy to set accurately. What more do you need?
The Man's got a point :lol:
Philly :D
 

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