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marcros

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I am going to put up some timber posts for a pergola (one side against house wall), and for a bbq shelter (more or less https://www.costco.co.uk/Garden-Sheds-P ... n/p/141031).

any recommendations for post shoes? I currently have soil soon to be covered with gravel, so they would need to go into this, or I can dig out for some concrete and either fix to that or concrete something in. posts will be 100x100 I think.
 

MikeG.

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I always get a fabricator to weld something up for me which I let into the foot of the posts and set in concrete. Along the lines of the Murdoch's, here. The part of the steel which is set in the concrete sticks in place better if it has a couple of big holes cut through it, and if it is bearing any weight then an L shape bent into it. I also always have a little shelf welded on, smaller than the bottom of the post, so that the weight isn't taken on the end of the cut in the post foot. For a really top notch job house out for that "shelf" such that the bottom edge of the post extends below it, so that rain will drip off rather than running into the junction between "shelf" and post.
 

MikeG.

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That's not ideal, no. The reinforcing rod won't resist twist very well, but more importantly doesn't allow the foot to be raised much above the ground. The further you can get the bottom of the timber off the ground the longer it will last.
 

rafezetter

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MikeG.":3jtb4umb said:
I always get a fabricator to weld something up for me which I let into the foot of the posts and set in concrete. Along the lines of the Murdoch's, here. The part of the steel which is set in the concrete sticks in place better if it has a couple of big holes cut through it, and if it is bearing any weight then an L shape bent into it. I also always have a little shelf welded on, smaller than the bottom of the post, so that the weight isn't taken on the end of the cut in the post foot. For a really top notch job house out for that "shelf" such that the bottom edge of the post extends below it, so that rain will drip off rather than running into the junction between "shelf" and post.
Not doing anything like this , but I can envision that design lasting a long time - so TY for *ahem* posting this - stored for later use :)
 

MikeG.

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El Barto":3tdle381 said:
.........Of course you'd need it to be stainless if it's to be oak - I saw some better stainless ones somewhere but can't find them now...
The red oxide paint used by fabricators is a two part stuff, and seems pretty bomb proof. I'll be using mild steel for my garage post feet despite it being oak, because they'll be red oxide painted.
 

MikeG.

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El Barto":2zudfn79 said:
I've seen these used a few times on modern oak framed porches: https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Heavy-Duty-G ... yYC9_a3zUQ

Of course you'd need it to be stainless if it's to be oak - I saw some better stainless ones somewhere but can't find them now...
I think that sort of thing is a mistake. Oak posts twist, and these have no way of resisting twist. If that isn't a problem, fine, but personally I try to restrain both ends of any piece of constructional oak such that it can't twist as it dries.
 

El Barto

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MikeG.":vt89m9h0 said:
El Barto":vt89m9h0 said:
I've seen these used a few times on modern oak framed porches: https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Heavy-Duty-G ... yYC9_a3zUQ

Of course you'd need it to be stainless if it's to be oak - I saw some better stainless ones somewhere but can't find them now...
I think that sort of thing is a mistake. Oak posts twist, and these have no way of resisting twist. If that isn't a problem, fine, but personally I try to restrain both ends of any piece of constructional oak such that it can't twist as it dries.
Interesting. So how do you ensure they don't twist at the other end of the post, where it's jointed?
 

MikeG.

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A pegged M&T resists twisting beautifully. Without diverting too much, my own personal theory is that ALL of the traditional British timber framing joints have been developed principally to resist twisting.
 

MikeG.

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A pegged M&T resists twisting beautifully. Without diverting too much, my own personal theory is that ALL of the traditional British timber framing joints have been developed principally to resist twisting.
 

El Barto

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MikeG.":i9wk3so7 said:
A pegged M&T resists twisting beautifully. Without diverting too much, my own personal theory is that ALL of the traditional British timber framing joints have been developed principally to resist twisting.
Also interesting theory! I'm not disagreeing or disputing the theory but I do wonder, if that is the case, why more hasn't been written about it. Checks, splits, cracks, joint failures are all pretty well written about but I don't recall any of them (that I've read) mentioning twist.
 
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