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Stanley 40 Vs 40 1/2

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GEPPETTO

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Hi All,

if I'd have to choose between Stanley 40 and Stanley 40/12 Scrub plane what you'd choose?
Any advices are welcome.
Thanks.
 

MikeW

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Hi Gabriele,

From the Blood and Gore web site:

#40 Scrub plane, 9 1/2" L, 1 1/4" W, 2 1/8lbs, 1896-1962
#40 1/2 Scrub plane, 10 1/2" L, 1 1/2" W, 2 1/2lbs, 1902-1948

Slightly different lengths, widths and weight--but not much.

Have fun,
 

bugbear

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At the risk of being difficult, if I was in Italy, and wanted a scrub plane, I probably wouldn't get a Stanley at all.

I'd either make my own using a narrow blade, or a buy a European woodie - e.g. ECE, or closer to home if cheaper.

BugBear
 
A

Anonymous

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Hi Gabriele,
I've had several #40's and one #40 1/2. There isn't much difference between the two except the #40 1/2 is much more uncommon and commands a higher price.
I would second Bugbear's opinion about getting an ECE unless you can find a vintage Stanley locally at a good price.
 

Frank D.

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Hi Gepetto,
Another brand that might be easy for you to find is Ulmia. They are very comparable to ECE, very good quality. I usually prefer metal planes but, even though I've tried a 40 1/2, I'm very content with my wooden scrub. The light weight is an advantage in a scrub because usually you take short quick strokes.
Frank
 

ydb1md

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You could just wait a few weeks and buy the Veritas scrub plane for $89. It'll be better than any vintage 40-1/2. :)
 

Rob Lee

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ydb1md":2zi18nmy said:
You could just wait a few weeks and buy the Veritas scrub plane for $89. It'll be better than any vintage 40-1/2. :)
Pssst - it's $79 HCS, $99 A2.... but only until July 17th.... 8)

Cheers -

Rob
 

Derek Cohen (Perth Oz)

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Hi Geppetto

I have a few scrub planes and use them a lot since I do not have a powered thicknesser.

A few observations:

I do not have a favourite since each seems different in a positive way.

The first one I used was one I made out of a ECE-type horned wooden (Norwegian) smoother. This has a great 1/8" thick by 1-3/4" wide blade. In some ways this is the perfect scrub since it is light and comfortable in use for long periods.

Then I bought a vintage Stanley #40 (just because it looked so cool), and what I like about this scrub is that it has a bit of heft and this is helpful when taking deeper cuts in hardwoods.

The third scrub I use was the result of a disaster. The only plane I ever inherited was my late father-in-law's Stanley #3. I used it for several years, quite happy in my ignorance that it had a very wide mouth and could not cut anything but pine, and even then was more like a short jack plane than a smoother. For some years it had lane on a shelf unused. Then a few months ago I decided that it would be more honourable to find a use for it than to abandon it as it was. So I opened the mouth some more (it really didn't need much more!) and ground the blade to a nice radius. You know what, even with the thinnest blade of this bunch, it does a nice job. What is special is the fact that I can adjust the depth of cut and this makes it possible to go from a trim to a deeper slice, which is useful when taking off high points.

So there are some options: make your own, buy your own, or rescue one.

Regards from Perth

Derek
 

GEPPETTO

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Hi Derek,

It seems as impossible to speak with the other side of the world, but modern technology can this and other.
And as contrarily we are speaking about hand tools, tools of an old age where technology was at its early steps.
Excuse me but this thought has come quite suddenly, when I think at Australia :roll: .
Your story has waked my intention to do my own scrub plane from an old unmarked smoothing plane I purchased years ago for few money.
In a far, very far time, I could think to make one infill type :shock: :roll:

Many thanks
 

ydb1md

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Roger Nixon":1azabbsl said:
Pssst - it's $79 HCS, $99 A2.... but only until July 17th.... 8)

Cheers -

Rob
Are you taking orders now?
I think Rob's ignoring us over here . . . he's been really busy over at that other wood forum. Too bad their board doesn't have much action and the layout of their forums is kinda lame. :roll:
 

Rob Lee

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ydb1md":2oidzhoj said:
Roger Nixon":2oidzhoj said:
Pssst - it's $79 HCS, $99 A2.... but only until July 17th.... 8)

Cheers -

Rob
Are you taking orders now?
I think Rob's ignoring us over here . . . he's been really busy over at that other wood forum. Too bad their board doesn't have much action and the layout of their forums is kinda lame. :roll:
Not ignoring anyone.... first time I set foot in my office in 6 hours....ever had one of those days?? :roll:

We start taking orders (and most important - shipping) on the 23rd....we're in full production, but haven't started assembly yet...

Cheers -

Rob
 

ydb1md

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Rob Lee":2e7z69nv said:
Not ignoring anyone.... first time I set foot in my office in 6 hours....ever had one of those days?? :roll:
I didn't really think you were ignoring us . . . how could anyone ignore a bunch of galoots like us? :eek:ccasion5:
 

bugbear

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my own scrub plane from an old unmarked smoothing plane
This will work "ok", but a #4 is not the ideal starting point. Given the amojunt of work a scrub does, a #5 gives more room around the handles.

A #5 1/4 is ideal, but FAR too rare and precious to be converted as a scrub.

I'd still have a go at making a Krenovian scrub. It's cheap and rewarding.

BugBear
 

GEPPETTO

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bugbear":1nvmi1yd said:
my own scrub plane from an old unmarked smoothing plane
This will work "ok", but a #4 is not the ideal starting point. Given the amojunt of work a scrub does, a #5 gives more room around the handles.

A #5 1/4 is ideal, but FAR too rare and precious to be converted as a scrub.

I'd still have a go at making a Krenovian scrub. It's cheap and rewarding.

BugBear

Oooopsss.. I have got only the #4 :roll:
 

Derek Cohen (Perth Oz)

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Gabriel

I think that I see what Bugbear is suggesting (no doubt he will chip in if I am on the wrong track :oops: ), that is, a #5 is longer and this length is better for flatness. Nevertheless, there is no reason that a #4 would not work well. The #40 is the same length as a #3, and I have not used anything longer than this in a scrub. I think that the width of the blade is a bigger issue since you are going to be gouging through quite deeply at times. A narrow blade is the way to go. This is easily dealt with by grinding the bevel into a curve or an arc. If you make the radius of this arc more pronounced (i.e. a deeper curve) it will have the same effect as a shallower arc on a narrower blade. Just for the record, the blade of a #40 is the same width as a #3 (1-3/4"), while the blade of a #4 is 2" wide.

Regards from Perth

Derek
 

GEPPETTO

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Hi Derek,

Ok I'll try to transform my #4, but I have another thought which tap my mind: the blade.

I know how to sharp/hone a flat edge, but I don't know what is the better way for a curved edge. Do I need of a particular stone or other?
 

Derek Cohen (Perth Oz)

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Hi Gabriele

I will try and describe this as best I can. If it comes out as garbage I will then take a photo for you.

There are two ways to grind a curve onto a blade. The first is just do it freehand at a grinder. Since the surface is going to be chewed up (although this can be chewed up neatly!), the blade shape is less critical. So just get as close a curve as you can. Of course, the grind angle is between 25 - 30 degrees as with all plane blades.

The second method is the one I prefer since it produces a clean, smooth curve. Cut a piece of hardwood the same size as the blade. At the end of this piece, shape the curve you want to grind. Now, since you are using a Stanley blade, which has a groove down the centre, bolt the two together. What you are going to do is use the curve on the hardwood as a template for the blade. The curve runs up against the edge of the grinder rest, and the blade (bolted to the top) is extended until it contacts the grinder wheel at approximately 25 degrees. You then turn the blade against the wheel using the curve of the hardwood template as a guide.

Once you have ground the curve (either fashion), it is necessary to hone the blade (sandpaper, waterstones, etc). It is not necessary to hone as high a grit as other plane blades as you asre not trying for a smooth finish. A 1200 waterstone is adequate, although I would prefer to go to at least 4000 myself.

Let me know if this is an adequate description.

Regards from Perth

Derek
 

GEPPETTO

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Hi Derek, thanks for your time,

Your explanation is clear, but I haven't a grinder (I think you are speaking of an electrical grinder) for the moment. Is it the only way to shape a curve on the edge of the blade?
And more, after I ground the blade Do I must put freehand the blade on the stone/sandpaper for honing? Do it exist a kind of jig to do this?

I hope I have explained clear what I wanted to say. :oops:
 
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