Screwing at an Angle,,,,

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Stevekane

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Ive been scarfing in new bottoms to a door frame, I cut the frame at an angle and screwed and glued new parts into place. I screwed up at an angle so that it would have the effect of pulling the new piece up to the old, but was wondering, does anyone know if this has any effect? I know that screwing straight in, in these circs there is a possibility of the parts moving apart, but does angled screwing pull the parts together?
 
Proper done the part being screwed to the other part needs a clearance hole large enough not to catch the threads of the screw., its that that causes the jacking up effect.

So if drilled proper like, the part getting attached will pull in tight.
 
I usually cut at angle( angled so as to shed water away.) cut the replacement section at similar angle. dryfix then dryflex them in perfect alignment. After it's dry then pop an angled deck screw in.
 
If you put the screw in at 90 degrees to the cut it should hopefully pull the pieces together and not alter the alignment.

If drilling at an angle to the cut it's best to drill a clearance hole in the outside piece as Triton says and also a pilot hole in the piece you are screwing into so hopefully the screw follows this path and doesn't pull things out of line as much.
 
Great replies, however as Doug has mentioned allinment, its actually that, that I was thinking would be a good thing, I like the parts to be pulled together and angleing the screws up has I think the effect of drawing the parts together,,,or has it?
Steve.
 
Great replies, however as Doug has mentioned allinment, its actually that, that I was thinking would be a good thing, I like the parts to be pulled together and angleing the screws up has I think the effect of drawing the parts together,,,or has it?
Steve.

Yes.............and no
 
It’s great to see the advice about pilot and clearance holes.( Though no mention of countersinking) 50 years ago when I was a trainee teacher a colleague told me not to raise my expectations too high. She said you can demonstrate the correct way to make a screwed joint every year for the 5 years they are here and there will still be at least one in the class who tries to put the screw with a hammer.
 
Pilot holes, countersinking and clearance holes is all valid stuff, its not going to creat any lateral presure, its the correct way of clamping bits together but unless you go to the trouble of setting your pilot hole off so that it pulls sideways it doesn't help you? Personaly I think screwing at an angle probably does help to pull a joint together if thats what you need.
 
It’s great to see the advice about pilot and clearance holes.( Though no mention of countersinking) 50 years ago when I was a trainee teacher a colleague told me not to raise my expectations too high. She said you can demonstrate the correct way to make a screwed joint every year for the 5 years they are here and there will still be at least one in the class who tries to put the screw with a hammer.
I see so many peeps angle screwing frames without a pilot hole into the joined piece (the screw tip receiving piece) and it is almost a given that the last tightening will pull the frames out of alignment.
By drilling the pilot hole into the screw tip receiving piece first the screw becomes its own guide and prevents any sideways movement during the last turn. Also if the angle is too great from the entry point the joint is very weak.

If you need absolute accuracy of the position it helps to have a small block to screw onto the frame and to press the frame against, whilst drilling and screwing to prevent any movement..... You then remove it and move to the next connection.

You might be able to avoid a pilot hole doing this but I've never tried that.... I prefer a pilot and use a block for mm accuracy. I hand built, using a Festool drill/driver frames over a five year period and used over 7km of CLS with this method plus PU glue.
 

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