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brianhabby

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Hi everyone,

I need to turn 8 handles for a project (Ships Wheel Clock over on the Projects forum), and would like the advice of you experts if possible please?

The handles will look something like this:



Whatever they look like they really all need to be the same. When I've tried to repeat something in the past it always proves more difficult than I thought to get an identical copy.

What would you do?

Hoping someone can help.

regards

Brian
 

AndyT

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I'm by no means an expert turner, and would struggle with this. But here's a thought:

You won't make them consistent without practice.
The last ones will be better than the first.
So don't assume you just need to make 8 - get extra wood and make a dozen or more, then pick out the eight which most closely match.
 

brianhabby

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Thanks for the replies,

I always figured I would have to make more than 8, I might not even get away with a dozen :( I'm making this project from chestnut as I have some left from my workshop doors so I have plenty for a few of these handles.

The profile template is not a bad idea.

I like that flapper video - really clever.

regards

Brian
 

Finial

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If you can do one, you can do them all. Make one as a sample, then do all the rest, with a couple of spares, one stage at a time. In other words do the same step on all of them before going on to the next step. Not the most efficient way of working, but you can see as you go that they are the same. And it all counts as practice.
 

babylon355

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I made photocopies of a template that I glued to some spindles then set up the fence and a depth stop on my bandsaw to make cuts down to the depth of the various features which I turned down to. When I reached the base of the cut I knew I was at the right depth in the right place. It's not really worth all the set up time for a couple of pieces but probably worth it with 8 or 9.
 

Richard Findley

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Hi Brian

The thing about this sort of turning is that if you break it down into stages it is simple, but it can feel a little overwhelming if you look at it as a whole.

Firstly, make your self a copy template, with the positions of each detail and measurments written on it:



The next thing you need to ask your self is "can I turn a bead to a good shape?" if not then practice until you can. Then ask "can I turn a bead in the postion I want it?" again, if no, then practice until you can.

Now look again at the design, you have a parrallel spindle with 2 full beads, a half bead and a long curve.

I have every confidence in you!! Good luck!!

Richard
 

Steve Jones

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Brian,

After having a broken dining chair leg copied by Richard Findley my advice would be would be to get Richard to do it :mrgreen:

Steve :)
 

tudormaker

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AndyT":j261bqsn said:
I'm by no means an expert turner, and would struggle with this. But here's a thought:
The last ones will be better than the first.
.
Do the last one first, so it's "simples"

Terry
 

brianhabby

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Well, it's been a couple of weeks since I asked about this and I've been practicing my techniques. This is what I've done today:



They are not perfect but I think they will be good enough, I'm quite pleased so far. They still need to be parted off but before I do that I think I should put some finish on.

regards

Brian
 

gregmcateer

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Bloody hell!
All that in a day - I am well impressed.
When you started the post, seemed you'd never done any copy turning - can't wait to see your candles for this month's challenge - You could just drill holes in a couple of them - job done!
Greg
 

Spindle

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Hi

A bit of a late response but here goes -

I produce the first spindle to my satisfaction, (the prototype), and place it behind the next piece of work mounted between centres - I set as many sets of dividers as necessary to the pertinant diameters and place them in order on the lathe bed. Rough the blank to the largest diameter and then mark off the positions for the divider diameters from the prototype and cut them using a parting tool. From here profile the rest of the spindle by visual reference to the prototype, (really helps if you can mount it directly behind and parrallel to the work). I think you will be peasantly surprised how accurate this method can be - spindles don't need to be identical to look right.
One other point is to always use the prototype as a reference - it stops errors being compounded.

Regards Mick
 

brianhabby

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Boysie,

Not quite sure easy is the correct word but I am well satisfied with them.

Greg,

Yes you are right I've never done any copy turning before, in fact I've hardly done any turning at all. I've only had the lathe set up for a few weeks but I have been spending far too much time watching youtube :)

Mick,

I did similar to what you suggest by setting the prototype behind the piece I was turning and it helped me stay focused. I haven't got any callipers so couldn't have used that suggestion. You can see the set up in this photo:



Phil,

That's a good tip not to put similar ones next to each other :)

I'm trying to figure out the next step for the main body of the clock now. I have to drill eight holes for the handles but don't have an indexing feature. I was going to try that yesterday but instead got carried away tidying the workshop :(

regards

Brian
 

Spindle

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Hi

Keep an eye open at boot sales for callipers - essential in my opinion, however open ended spanners can be used for sizing in a lot of applications.

Regards Mick
 
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