Repairing a cordless driver

UKworkshop.co.uk

Help Support UKworkshop.co.uk:

This site may earn a commission from merchant affiliate links, including eBay, Amazon, and others.

bluenose

Established Member
Joined
7 Oct 2010
Messages
177
Reaction score
30
Location
Exmouth Devon
My son left his cordless screwdriver out in the rain recently (not on purpose!) and, I am wondering if it is possible to repair it.

I don't think that it's worth taking it to a pro repair shop and would prefer to have a go at it myself if possible.

What is the ususal form of damage that is caused from it getting a soaking, is it the winding or damage to chips?

I will dismantle it on my bench shortly and am wondering if there are usually any clear visible signs as to where the damage might be.

Many thanks in advance of any input.
 
Make & model might help.

I would not take it apart at this stage but leave it in a warm place like in the sun but make sure you have removed the battery and you might be ok when it dry's out.
 
It won't be damaged by simply getting wet.

It will be damaged by trying to use it (let electricity pass through it) while humid/damp/soaking inside.

As above, but opening the clamshell cover (kind of a minimal disassembly) would help the air to circulate and dry it faster.
 
I'm on the same page as @ChaiLatte .
Don't turn the tool on
Do open up the shell and put it somewhere warm to dry out
If it's wet, wipe off what you can with paper towel first.
Electronics should be sealed to protect from dust and this will help to protect them from rain
These is a risk that water gets into the bearings or gearbox, but not necessarily.
You may well get a bit of surface rust around the chuck but that won't be too harmful
First approach is to get it properly dried out over a few days, reassemble and try it.

For purely mechnical parts like the chuck, a trick is to use Water Displacement (WD) 40. Spray it on wet metal and it helps to displace the water and reduce rusting. Don't use it on bearings or gears because it will tend to dissolve the thicker grease that is in those.
 
Hello chaps, thank you so much for your valued input, as always it's much appreciated.

It's been a couple of weeks since this happened and I've got no idea if he tried to use it whilst it was still wet. I should think that there is a good chance that he did try which, from your comments, would have been much too soon.

I will try to open it up and see if there is anything obvious. Thanks again.
 
It may be worth you investing in a kilo of Silica Gel ......I've used it in the past to dry out electrical items that have been immersed or subjected to exposure to water and it's always worked a treat.( dropped my I Phone into a toilet once..!!! 🤬)

I also store small packets (Tea Bag size) in quite a few of my power tool cases, as this tends to stop rust from forming on the bare metal parts.
 
According to this video it should be okay if it's a Festool 🙄

The video is from a few years ago, you do wonder if this guy is still around or if he's managed to get himself a Darwin award......... :unsure:

 
That's nothing ! When I were a lad ...

Seriously, I saw a video many years ago promoting a competitor to WD40 spray. They used it to liberally spray into a 240V corded drill then a guy started the drill and just plunged it and his hand in a fishtank full of water. He didn't get a shock and the drill didn't miss a beat. I have no idea if the spray made the difference.
 
That's nothing ! When I were a lad ...

Seriously, I saw a video many years ago promoting a competitor to WD40 spray. They used it to liberally spray into a 240V corded drill then a guy started the drill and just plunged it and his hand in a fishtank full of water. He didn't get a shock and the drill didn't miss a beat. I have no idea if the spray made the difference.
I think you should have mentioned "don't try this at home folks".:)
 
I dropped my mobile phone into a toilet bowl our of my top pocket, put it in front of the air conditioning vent in the car on the way home and all was well when I switched it back on.
 
Dunno about power tools but deffo most phones and other abusable bits of electrickery like tablets have in-built moisture sensors such that repairers will know upfront if moisture has ingressed at some point by way of a colour change, thus allowing an easy execution of any clause to that effect in your insurance
 
That's nothing ! When I were a lad ...

Seriously, I saw a video many years ago promoting a competitor to WD40 spray. They used it to liberally spray into a 240V corded drill then a guy started the drill and just plunged it and his hand in a fishtank full of water. He didn't get a shock and the drill didn't miss a beat. I have no idea if the spray made the difference.
Didn't WD40 have an advert where they ran a Ford Escort at the bottom of a swimming pool, having first sprayed all the electrics?
 
Hello ... I have a(n old) Makita 8391D ... and the chuck is not gripping very well now ... any advice on replacements ... Makita original or anything else .... I think it has a Philipps screw or Allen key or something to remove it ... but I haven't got that far yet
 
Last edited:

Latest posts

Back
Top