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Planning a new shed.

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SquareCircle

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This post is not strictly woodworking (but in relates to a major facilitator thereof) so apologies in advance if it upsets the pure woodies.
I am thinking about building a new shed. The actual construction isn’t probably going to happen for a little while. Nevertheless but the mere thought appeals to the Civil Engineer in me so no harm in starting the planning early.
Footprint is going to be around 60m2 and the big question now is which primary wall construction method would give the optimum performance where noise containment, thermal insulation and capital and maintenance costs are concerned? A brickwork / blockwork structure or a timber structure with various layers of sheathing and insulation. The immediate advantage of timber is that I can build it my self (O.K the electrics now need to be one by a Part P qualified electrician). Seems though that a block / brickwork structure will be a lot more durable. I am not sure which offers the better noise performance.
Reinforced concrete, (whether in-situ, pre-stressed or post tensioned) has already be discounted on the grounds of excessive cost.
I am sure that many have considered similar in the past (there are so many knowledgeable people on the forum). Therefore wonder if any members would care to volunteer any considered views on this subject

regards

SC
 

Chris Knight

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SC,
I think my PC has developed time travel abilities - I have just read about your new shed elsewhere. If you send me a suitable inducement, I can tell you what you built, that will save you from reinventing the wheel! :lol:

I am off now to look at the results of next Saturday's lottery draw.. :lol:

A couple of thoughts:-

1. Include a dedicated finishing space
2. Walls need to be designed to hang heavy stuff on otherwise you give up a lot of potentially valuable space.
3. Make a dedicated, sound proofed, separate enclosure outside for dust collector, and a compressor.
4. Make it as tall as you can - pitched roof?
5. A sink and running water are very useful.
6. Try and reserve dedicated space for assembly operations. Lines on he floor are enough - just a good reminder not to encroach on it whatever the temptation.
 

jasonB

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10mx6m is a big shed, have you considered the planning restrictions regarding roof heights and total area of garden to be used as well as the structure will need to be 5.0m from the house to avoid planing permission(if not in a conservation area)

If 10mx6m is the likely floor plan I would lay three strip foundations 10m long, 3m apart. On top of these lay four courses of brick or 100mm blocks laid flat with a DPC on top. Bed treated timber wall plates onto this, then joists with rigid insulation between, vapour barrier then 22mm T&G plywood.

You can then build your timber walls off of this from 6x2 studwork with rigid insulation, Tyvek or similar outside with timber cladding. Vapour barrier and plywood internally.

Roof will depend on whatr pitch you have to use but a 6.om span will probably need central support unless you go with trusses or steelwork.

Jason
 

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How about building with structural insulated panels? You could make the panels yourself if desired and then erect them when ready. They could have openings for windows roughed in and all the electrical already installed. All you would need to do is connect the panels.
 

jasonB

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Dave, we don't see a lot of SIP's overhere at the moment but they certainly would be a quick way of construction with the use of timber I-beams to get the spans for the roof.

Not sure how easily they could be made to get a strong bond between the sheathing and insulation may be easier to buy ready made.

Jason
 

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We don't see an awful lot of it here yet either but it is intriguing to me. I like the idea of being able to start with a slab in the morning and have an entirely closed structure by supper time.

My bride and I are in the planning stages of a house and SIPs are one of the appealing construction methods were considering. The other and leading one is insulated concrete forms to the roofline. I'd have suggested that but it sounds like concrete is out for SC.
 

SquareCircle

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Chris:
Unfortunately time travel remains a concept. The existing workshop (which you probably read about elsewhere) will have reverted to an empty shell with bare walls by weekend. The new owners of our house take possession in approximately 8 days and have designated the shed a ‘chill out room’. So much for 6 years of hard work. :( Would however like to think I got fair value for the property, so I can’t complain. :)

What would you consider an acceptable inducement? :wink: :wink:

Jason
Planning is very much in mind. We are fortunate enough to be moving to a house with a sizable rear garden. It is not a conservation area but the proposed size probably exceeds Permitted Development. The ‘utility building / playroom’ is standalone and will probably go forward to planning at the same time as proposals for ‘improvements’ to the house. This is also the only way I can get it past the boss. :roll:
I presume that you are suggesting timber building. Any ideas on how it stacks up for noise containment? I do a most WW after work and kids to bed; i.e rather unsociable hours

Dave
Structural insulated panels – any clues on construction details, and likely performance on noise criteria? Immediate thought is that dry storage of panels (say 90m2 at nominally 250mm thk) ), whilst fabricating out of garage, could be a bit of a problem. Also not sure how this would get around Part P regs where electrical installation is concerned.

thanks for the response

SC
 

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SC, I've seen info about building insulated panels but can't find it now. I'll look more though. In the meantime take a look at this for some information. These folks might give you info on PartP, too.

Edited because I'm too thick to add the link first time around. http://www.buildit-green.co.uk/
 
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