Options etc For Wooden Threads

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StraightOffTheArk

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So I have a couple of thread boxes and I'd like some advice on setting up/using them properly. The modern one has a tap with it, the old one doesn't so I'm planning on threading a dowel with a conical point, sawing down its length and inserting an old bit of saw plate suitably shaped to scrape an internal thread - will this work?

I've used the new one with mixed results, but I've always just been messing around so good results weren't particularly crucial. Now I'm making a sewing frame and press for bookbinding so, particularly for the press, it's important to get it right so it can take the pressure. To prepare the dowels I've covered them in linseed oil and wrapped them in linseed oil soaked tissue and kept in a plastic bag. I'm going to soak them for a week (which will end in a couple of days).

Does anyone have any advice on sharpening the cutters? I've sharpened them how I'd sharpen a vee gouge, but what about the angle of the vee edges to the bottom?

Here's some photo's - they both have their covers.
P1120192b.jpg
P1120193b.jpg
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P1120195b.jpg

'little forest' on youtube also has a few videos on making them - little forest - which I'll try if I have to, otherwise, any suggestions for making threads gratefully received!
 

Droogs

Is that chisel shar ... Ow
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The usual way for people to make Taps and Dies from scratch is to try and get a bolt of the size and thread you would like. Then file some grooves (usually 3 at 120Deg) lengthways along the bolt with a slight under cut of the leading edge of the thread to encourage cutting. Then harden the bolt by quenching and annealing it. Once done get a block of beech or ash and drill a hole to the inside diameter of the bolt and then cut the thread into it. Then inset a 60 degree V shaped sharp bit of metal (just as in the ready made die to cut the internal threads.

Regarding the dowel you want to thread, get a bit of plastic pipe just a bit longer and wider diameter than the dowel so it fits in easily bung up one end and put the dowel in. Fill the pipe with veggie oil or sunflower oil until the dowel is cover and leave for a few days. Then give it a wipe and cut the thread. For internals if the hole is blind just fill with oil if open then a ring of hot melt glue and a square of ply or plastic on one end and let cool and then fill with oil for a few days and then tape the hole.


Threadboxes are a doddle to make the hard part is finding a suitable bolt in the first place. Try to find places that have old heavy industrial kit about as they are the best place to find Whitworth Bolts which make fantastic woodwork taps.
hth
 

thick_mike

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Threadboxes are a doddle to make the hard part is finding a suitable bolt in the first place. Try to find places that have old heavy industrial kit about as they are the best place to find Whitworth Bolts which make fantastic woodwork taps.
hth

This looks like it might be a good use for broken cheap vices on the other thread.
 

Inspector

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My father did his with a table saw and jig he whipped up. I had a blade modified for it. There are router jigs that you can buy that do a decent job.

Pete
 

StraightOffTheArk

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Thanks for the replies so far - I hadn't considered veg oil, not having enough linseed was why I didn't use a pipe for soaking the dowels. I need/prefer a wooden thread partly for aesthetics but also because they are less likely to damage a book/paper that inadvertently makes contact - no need for oil either. I'm going to try using what I've got as much as I can rather than invest money/time into other things, if I fail I'll try something else. I do have a lathe, but very little experience, but I am thinking that in the long run, i.e. should I wish to do anymore (is it possible to have too many book presses?!) that may be a better option - happy to be pointed to a good book/video etc - Cheers!
 
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