Quantcast
  • We invite you to join UKWorkshop.
    Members can turn off viewing Ads!

Non yellowing varnish?

UKworkshop.co.uk

Help Support UKworkshop.co.uk:

Calv

Established Member
Joined
15 Jan 2005
Messages
76
Reaction score
0
What is the correct thing to look out for when buying a clear varnish that i don't want to give a yellowy tint?

I've just finished something for my kids but when i used the gloss varnish it leaves it a bit yellowy and not totaly clear.

Any suggestions?

Calv.
 

Chris Knight

Established Member
Joined
14 Jan 2004
Messages
6,641
Reaction score
3
Location
SE London - NW Kent
The waterborne gloss finishes are the clearest you can easily get ( I don't recommend the more complicated catalysed finishes at this stage). They are made by just about everyone under the sun these days. I can't really recommend one above the other at the moment. I was pretty happy with the results of a Ronseal I used on ash a while ago.

( Teaching Granny here. You will know the waterborne ones because they always say quick drying - often as little as 30 minutes - and brush cleanup is in water!)
 

RogerS

Established Member
Joined
20 Feb 2004
Messages
17,391
Reaction score
78
Location
In the eternally wet North
Chris

Is that really kosher re Ronseal?

I used some a few years back (and admittedly it wan't water based) and the result was awful (yellow) and I swore never to touch their products again.

But I rate your advice....

Cheers

Roger
 

jasonB

Established Member
Joined
26 Nov 2004
Messages
5,044
Reaction score
0
Location
Surrey
The water based Ronseal will not yellow the wood, but the oil based will do. I prefer Aquacote for big jobs but the ronseal is handy for applying on site.

Jason
 

Chris Knight

Established Member
Joined
14 Jan 2004
Messages
6,641
Reaction score
3
Location
SE London - NW Kent
Roger,

Yes it is kosher or maybe halal. In any case, I was concerned that the finish I used should yellow as little as possible and got a couple of types, the Ronseal and a Dulux that claimed to be crystal clear. I tried both but as I mentioned elsewhere, I was having trouble eliminating brush marks (I usually spray or use a rubber to apply finishes) and the Dulux gave me more trouble than the Ronseal.

I did compare the yellowing I got (and I am speaking of the results shortly after applying the finish, I can't speak for the longer term) and I think the Dulux was slightly better on the test pieces I made, However, I went with the Ronseal because I felt I had a chance to make a better job of applying it.

Now, having learnt how to get the sort of smooth finish I wanted, I would be much less concerned about using the Dulux.

The smallest tins (250 ml) are not too expensive and if in doubt I would get two or three as I did and test them.

The bottom line is that the water-borne stuff is far less yellowing than the oil based kinds - indeed, many people find the colouration too cold for their liking and seek to warm it up. However for a pale wood this was not a problem.
 

David Devlinski

New member
Joined
18 Nov 2013
Messages
1
Reaction score
0
Location
Norfolk UK
I have experienced the same problem. When using the Ronseal Exterior varnish on a white painted wood the white miraculously turns "Yellow" that's fair enough but what really gets me is contrary to the "Trades description Act" when a product openly claims to do"What it says on the tin" i.e. "CLEAR" Varnish, someone is telling "porkies? it isn't Clear at all, it's actually "Yellow?"
 

yetloh

Established Member
Joined
1 Dec 2008
Messages
1,363
Reaction score
13
Location
Sussex
As far as I can tell, pretty much all the water borne finishes have a milky appearance in the can and that does translate to some extent to the finished film, so they don't have quite the clarity of something like a pre-catalysed lacquer. They also tend to have a rather cold look which can be mitigated by presealing with a couple of coats of shellac. Depending on the wood species being used, long term, yellowing of the wood itself is likely to be a much more important factor than any yellowing of a water borne lacquer.

Jim
 

spr0cket

Member
Joined
28 Nov 2013
Messages
7
Reaction score
0
Location
Hampshire
Another +1 for Ronseal. I think it's diamond satin that we used on interior oak doors.
Fitted and finished them around 3 years ago and aside from the oak darkening a tad as it does.... Not suffered with it looking pine coloured as I found oil based products tended to.

Plus the clean up and drying times are a further bonus in the time constrained times that we all enjoy.
 

Latest posts

Top