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mikec

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Hi Guys,

I am getting a Record SS16V for Christmas to expand my wood adventures. I would love to get a Hegner or Excalibur but the budget is limited. My initial use will be to cut out veneers to enhance my woodturning and to cut parts for my other love, Napoleonic wooden ship modelling. I am sure it will have its own version of the woodturning "slippery slope" :D :D :D

I notice that you guys seem to buy blades in 1/2 gross or more quantities. I have ordered the assortment set from Mikes Workshop as a starter.

My question is - how long do the blades last? I know it depends on usage but I have no frame of reference to make any sort of estimate.

Regards,


mikec
 

Gill

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The standard answer is, "About twenty minutes".

:)

However, it's not as simple as that. I find the big enemy of blades is not wear but heat which builds up from the friction of cutting and causes the blade to dull. Fine blades heat more quickly than coarse blades; a project with tight turns often leads to the blade 'binding' against the material being cut (which in turn generates heat); skip-tooth blades distribute the swarf more easily, thus minimising friction; thick materials inhibit the distribution of swarf; some materials are more abrasive than others (MDF and plywood, for instance, use adhesives which are abrasive); a fast stroke speed generates more heat than a slow speed; some substances such as masking tape overlays can lubricate the blade as it cuts, thereby reducing friction and extending blade longevity.

That might not be the longest sentence ever written on this forum, but it's up there :) . The point is, there are so many factors which can affect the cutting edge of a blade and the scroller's experience counts for so much. I've had #9 blades lose their edge after five minutes when cutting 30mm maple and I've had #0/2 blades last for days when inlaying veneers. By the same token, I've had an awful time trying to keep fine blades bright when cutting fine slivers of African blackwood. Generally speaking, I hope for the best but prepare for the worst :) .

If you're going to be cutting veneers, can I suggest that you find some way to create a zero-clearance sub-table or insert for your saw? This will offer the veneers as much support as possible, or you run the risk of having them splinter when they are cut. The simplest way to do this is to take a stiff piece of card such as a business card, cut about half-way into it, then tape it in place tight against the blade. You might also find that you get pleasing results if you sandwich your veneer between waste pieces of card in order to minimise splintering. Don't be afraid to apply low-tack masking tape directly to your veneers, either; not only will this support the veneers but it will lubricate your blades and increase their longevity.
 
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