New computer spec?

UKworkshop.co.uk

Help Support UKworkshop.co.uk:

stuartpaul

Established Member
Joined
11 Feb 2003
Messages
1,062
Reaction score
59
Location
Somerset
Old laptop is dying so it’s time for a new pc. This time we’re going for an all in one desktop and as usual I find sorting out the specification ridiculously difficult as I’m happy to admit I know very little about them.

With a max budget of £600 this one appears to be quite good and for our needs (basic home use with some photo editing) would seem to fit the bill.


I hate the process because if I get it wrong we have to live with it for quite a few years. Any help or general thoughts appreciated.
 

Terry - Somerset

Established Member
Joined
22 Dec 2012
Messages
1,217
Reaction score
642
Location
Taunton
My brother in law used to work for IBM and he recommended Lenovo when I asked him much the same question.

His view, which seemed plausible to me, was that for most people almost any computer would have adequate processing power unless you have very specific needs - high end games, lots of video editing etc.

Both the fairly low end laptop and desktop have worked flawlessly for the last three+ years.
 

EddyCurrent

Established Member
Joined
4 Nov 2015
Messages
234
Reaction score
83
Location
Cumberland, uk
The right way to choose a computer is to first identify the software you want to run on it. The stated hardware requirements of that software will provide a minimum starting point.
 

Spectric

Established Member
Joined
19 Feb 2015
Messages
3,876
Reaction score
2,043
Location
North Cumbria
Run a mile, that Lenovo is not brilliant and only has 8 Gig of Ram. I always build my own systems so I know what is inside the case, the same reason I will not eat shop brought pies. I know it saves space having a compact system but with a std Pc if something needs replacing it is straightforward and the same for upgrades. I like the fact it has an AMD processor that is a bonus and the SSD but look at a base unit and screen system and you will get more for the money. 16 Gig of Ram is cheap these days and makes a huge difference to performance especially with multi tasking. If you have a local Pc specialist talk to them as they will provide a more custom solution rather than Pc world, or look at Overclockers / Scan computers online .
 

Spectric

Established Member
Joined
19 Feb 2015
Messages
3,876
Reaction score
2,043
Location
North Cumbria
Forgot to mention that at the moment a lot of Pc items and parts seem to be in short supply and higher cost, I am looking to get some components and they are really expensive but have been told they will fall when demand is met.
 

clogs

just can't decide
Joined
24 Jul 2020
Messages
1,541
Reaction score
859
Location
Vamos, Crete, GREECE.......
we used normal PC's n laptops but kept getting bugs......tried Norton anti-virus.....what a waste of money that was.......
in the end a good freind who uses prof Apple gear (he makes and produces short films) talked me into an Apple 27" all in one jobby......over 10 years ago.......
gotta say never looked back.......the money we saved on getting the Windows computor cleaned n fixed paid the difference for the new gear......
now we are all Apple.....
2x 27"inchers, 2 laptops, mini mac, 3 x I-phones........not for everyone but suits us......
BUT when something better and cheaper comes along (thats as easy to use) as the Apple products, we'll jump ship.....
but that's never gonna be WINDOWS and if it were I wouldn't change back on principle......

as for every one saying they upgrade to new systems and the old ones wont work is all HYPE.....
they all do it.....Windows 10 wont work most of the old systems at all.....
u have to buy new or special feature to use ur old programs....and all I hear on one or two other forums that it's always causing probs.....
Sorry Stuart £600 wont get u into Apple even if u wanted....... good luck....
 

paulrbarnard

Established Member
Joined
5 Mar 2017
Messages
935
Reaction score
1,002
Location
Shepton Mallet, UK
As well as the RAM being today’s minimum of 8G the disk is also a little on the small side. It’s nice it’s SSD but a larger disk, even if it’s a rotating disk, might be a better option. There are hybrid disks now that are a reasonable compromise on speed and size.
 

Jameshow

Established Member
Joined
4 Oct 2020
Messages
2,855
Reaction score
1,600
Location
Bradford
I would go for a desktop over a computer in the back if the screen jobbie as the components are better ventilated and easy to replace if they die.

Cheers James
 

D_W

Established Member
Joined
24 Aug 2015
Messages
9,519
Reaction score
1,913
Location
PA, US
My brother in law used to work for IBM and he recommended Lenovo when I asked him much the same question.

His view, which seemed plausible to me, was that for most people almost any computer would have adequate processing power unless you have very specific needs - high end games, lots of video editing etc.

Both the fairly low end laptop and desktop have worked flawlessly for the last three+ years.

Apple or lenovo and from time to time, Dell (i guess dell comes and goes in terms of what their attitude is) from a relative who takes care of IT for a large school district.

His view is that the more common stuff here in the states like acer and HP is generally junk that comes back to him to fix too often.

Coincidentally, we've had good luck with the HP stuff, but it does feel cheap and while it may last 6 or 7 years before it poops, I always end up with tape on the case holding things together, etc. We didn't have very good luck with a lenovo laptop, but that's just a matter of anecdotes that don't fit larger experience. Lenovo cost a lot more to get the same spec, though, and the refurb market isn't as strong as the consumer stuff in the US.
 

D_W

Established Member
Joined
24 Aug 2015
Messages
9,519
Reaction score
1,913
Location
PA, US
I would go for a desktop over a computer in the back if the screen jobbie as the components are better ventilated and easy to replace if they die.

Cheers James

Ditto that. With a budgeting habit of $600 each 6 years, going up $100 each time, SSD and large magnetic fit spec last time, with 16g ram. Current PC has gone three and doesn't strike as having a good chance of getting to 6, but it's endured more work at home and kids moving (dropping) it. refurb market in the US is strong, though (600 or 700 refurb is probably comparable to 1000 new, and refurb artists usually include more OEM licensed software - that seems a bit suspicious, too, but hasn't failed to register, etc).
 

Stevejmon

New member
Joined
9 Nov 2020
Messages
4
Reaction score
3
Location
Hampshire
Call Scan computers and discuss what you want, and more importantly, what you want it for. It's easy to get lulled into thinking that a powerful and expensive graphics card and powerful multi-cored CPU is crucial and the price tag that comes with them, when in fact you are unlikely to need them. They are for film editing professionals, automotive design simulation users and for gaming nerds. Highly unlikely that you will need one.

A low powered computer just takes a little longer to do its work. And I doubt that would be a problem to you. You do live in Somerset after all!

Don't take this the wrong way but you suggest you know little about computers, therefore it is unlikely you need a specialist, high-powered system; just something that will run the basic, run-of-the-mill programs you will use.

And steer clear of Apple.
 

Sideways

Established Member
Joined
26 Dec 2017
Messages
1,916
Reaction score
699
Location
United Kingdom
Everyone I know is fed up to the back teeth of computers, IT and operating systems. Microsoft, Apple, Google, all of them force constant software updates that grind your hardware to a halt long before it breaks.
If you possibly can, choose open source OS and programmes and opt out of the constant updates and IT tax burden that it imposes on you.
If you can get off the treadmill you'll save a fortune.
I haven't allowed my PC or phone update in 3+ years. Since I don't let MS, Google (or Apple) break them, they still run the way they are supposed to !
After a lifetime of Apple at home and MS at work, I have just a lenovo tiny desktop pc now. Solid and solid state, it saves me space and is never turned off. Overpriced sure, but the reliability and convenience has a value.
 
Last edited:

Jameshow

Established Member
Joined
4 Oct 2020
Messages
2,855
Reaction score
1,600
Location
Bradford
Dell have been good for us.

CCL have been good for my sons pc's who are gamers.

Cheers James
 

thetyreman

Established Member
Joined
4 Mar 2016
Messages
3,740
Reaction score
823
Location
North West
I'd stay clear of scan, terrible company, wait until something goes wrong or they don't have anything in stock, I am speaking from personal experience here.
 

D_W

Established Member
Joined
24 Aug 2015
Messages
9,519
Reaction score
1,913
Location
PA, US
Everyone I know is fed up to the back teeth of computers, IT and operating systems. Microsoft, Apple, Google, all of them force constant software updates that grind your hardware to a halt long before it breaks.
If you possibly can, choose open source OS and programmes and opt out of the constant updates and IT tax burden that it imposes on you.
If you can get off the treadmill you'll save a fortune.
I haven't allowed my PC or phone update in 3+ years. Since I don't let MS, Google (or Apple) break them, they still run the way they are supposed to !
After a lifetime of Apple at home and MS at work, I have just a lenovo tiny desktop pc now. Solid and solid state, it saves me space and is never turned off. Overpriced sure, but the reliability and convenience has a value.

other than enormous security issues, I have a feeling that a large percentage of the "updates" have more to do with finding ways to collect your data or summarize it in a way that's more valuable to the software updater (that is, urgent updated are probably often urgent because they generate more revenue in data value once you apply them).
 

powertools

Established Member
Joined
7 Jun 2011
Messages
1,839
Reaction score
215
Location
Bedfordshire
I would suggest that as an average home computer user you do some research on Chromebooks.
We no longer have a pc of any type having now gone over to a Chromebook and I don't think we miss anything we had but are pleased with the lack of issues we now have.
 

Ollie78

Established Member
Joined
4 Aug 2011
Messages
1,394
Reaction score
637
Location
Wiltshire
I just bought a mini pc to run my cnc machine it was £400 and is about the size of a couple of beer cans.
It is a Ryzen 3400g so a full 65w chip not a laptop chip, 16gb ram and a 500gb nvme ssd. The beauty of this type of chip (APU) is that it has built in graphics but better than the standard intel built in graphics.
This little machine surprised me with its performance, it runs everything very well including fusion 360 and games and stuff.

At the moment there is a graphics card shortage and ludicrous pricing, partly due to crypto miners, partly covid and silicon shortage. So not the best time to buy a pc.
Personally I would not buy that lenovo or any all in one, you can get a monitor pretty cheap and a mini pc like I got which can be mounted to the back of the monitor. This way you get more options on spec, you can upgrade the monitor or system seperately if required and add ram and storage as you please. For under £600 you should be able to find a system to kick the hell out of that lenovo aio.

Ollie
 

RobinBHM

Established Member
Joined
17 Sep 2011
Messages
7,210
Reaction score
1,394
Location
Wst Sussex
With a max budget of £600

I sometimes buy acers which are ok.

Here is a box only:
Intel i5
1 tb SSD
8gb ram


Refurbished Acer XC-885 Core i5-9400 8GB 16GB Intel Optane 1TB Windows 10 Desktop

Price £489


Add on a monitor £98



Then just repurpose or buy a cheap mouse and keyboard.
 

Spectric

Established Member
Joined
19 Feb 2015
Messages
3,876
Reaction score
2,043
Location
North Cumbria
Everyone I know is fed up to the back teeth of computers, IT and operating systems. Microsoft, Apple, Google, all of them force constant software updates that grind your hardware to a halt long before it breaks.
Many years ago in the days of the 286, 386, 486 and then Pentium using NT4 OS we often thought that there was some timing mechanism built in that over time slowed things down to make you upgrade and keep the industry moving, these were when a single 4 Meg ram stick would cost £120 so upgrading was never cheap. I think now for the average Joe that there is currently not a huge incentive in upgrading or buying high spec PC's which seem to be aimed at either gamers or high end CAD systems where spending several thousand on a graphics card is the norm as even basic machines can run your office programs and handle day to day task. Must say never had an issue with Scan in the last 15 years and brought 75% of all items from them.
 

Latest posts

Top