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Smiffla

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Hi all smudge here needing help and some of your well respected knowledge.

I've got a load of sawn hardwood coming my way - unsure of species'.

I'm gonna use it to do my floor. I'll be designing my own parquet floor - probably charing basket pattern or there abouts. It'll be layed on treated super flat concrete.

Anyway what I need help with is the drying of the wood. The wood has been air dried outside uncovered for a couple years and my plan was to leave it in my conservatory with a dehumidifier for a month or so to try and get the moisture content down.

Is this a good idea or has anyone else got any other suggestions?

Also I'm wondering what moisture content parameters I need to be aiming for. I'm thinking between 10-15%? Could I go higher or is that just an issue waiting to happen?

Any help would be gratefully appreciated.

Pictures will follow when I get started.

Cheers in advance

Smudge

Anyway
 

jimi43

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The general view is that you keep the wood for a time in the environment it will eventually end up in.

I would store it in the corner of the same room for a few months...especially if you have central heating as that dries out wood pretty efficiently...hence why old furniture has split etc...since the advent of radiators!

Jim
 

Chrispy

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Hi Smudge not done parquet myself but I have seen what happens if its laid on a damp concrete base very impressive! I can only suggest that the concrete needs to be totaly dry and the wood cut to near finished sizes left in room to settle down before final sizing, being to dry could be more of a problem than to damp, if the floor dries out after laying you will end up with small gaps, if the floor absorbs moisture then it will expand and could lift in the centre.
 

coyot

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And at the end, when you install the floor, don't forget the gaps around the room - circa 20 mm, so the wood can expand a bit without lifting in centre..
I would recommend to lay it down at the end of spring or summer.
Good luck, Frank
 

yetloh

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I agree with the earlier posts, best solution is to keep it in the room in which it will be laid. It's not clear whether or not the room has skirting boards. if it has, you will get a much nicer job if you take them off and trim back the architraves so that the flooring can run underneath. It's a lot more work than running quadrant round the edge to cover the movement gap but I think the improvement in appearance is well worth the effort.

Jim
 

Smiffla

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Thanks for the replies very informative.

Im thinking about using some kind of adhesive to stick the flooring down instead of t&g. is this wise?

Also what moisture content should i be aiming for?

Smudge
 

coyot

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Hi Smudge,for example flooring adhesive :
http://www.ukflooringdirect.co.uk/Acces ... L_Tub.html
just google it... It's messy job, but work's well.
And the moisture content of wood should be roughly 12% (before you leave it in the same room, but you have to leave it there AT LEAST 4 weeks, better longer..)
Cheers, frank
 

Smiffla

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Nice one frank looks like a decent product. Im wondering when you say moisture content should be 12%, you mean it has to be that before i transfer it to the room im installing it in?

also looking for a decent and very hard wearing finish preferrably matt or satin. Oh, and im thinkin of doin it in my kitchen. Is this wise?

Smudge
 

coyot

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Moisture content 10-12% BEFORE bringing the wood inside, it will adjust in the environment naturally, the really important thing is to leave it in the room where you install it for longer period of time before installation (as long as possible).
Finishes - you can finish the wood floor basically 3 ways :
A) wax
B) oil or mixture of both
C) lacquer or varnish (usually water based polyurethane [PU], sometimes two-pack...) (google, it's plenty sources outhere..)
I would recommend C), especially for kitchen use - it's pretty easy to apply it, clean tools and maintain the floor.
Don't go for matt, it won't stay matt as you walk on it and slowly you and the rest of your family will polish it ;-) Get some semi-gloss or satin.

I don't know, if I can recommend here some companies or products (? admin ?), but if yes, look for Wood Finishes Direct (they stock almost any kind of finish) or just simply get Bona Traffic, I've used it over years and I have the best experience ....

Cheers,
Frank
 

Smiffla

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Thats some awesome advice frank thanks alot. looked at the bona traffic sounds perfect. doesnt say what area the tub covers though.

Just posted another topic regarding a similar product by morrells. But if you suggest bona ill go with that.

Legend!

Smudge
 

M4RKE

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As far as the finish goes frank i think you will find it hard to get better than the allready suggested Bona this is the choice of most hardwood floor layers i have seen on various jobs. I do belive it is also very expensive but I would say that you want a finish thats going to hold up to heavy use sometimes you just have to bite the bullit. And for an expansion joint i have seen cork used just around the outer edge.
 

Benchwayze

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Parquet flooring looks superb when done properly, and carefully nurtured.

In the 1950s, I spent 12 months at HMS Ganges. All the mess-deck floors were parquet, and were exceedingly well-cared for. Along with my fellow recruits I spent countless hours on hands and knees, hand brushing individual blocks (along the grain :cry: ) with boot brushes and wax; especially my own 'bed-space'. So, despite the appearance of the blocks, I have an aversion to parquet flooring. Still, as said, it does look good.

All the same, I think there was a reason it went out of favour. I.e., it doesn't get on with central heating. Also, that one loose block that you keep treading on becomes a real PITA!

Best of luck

John :ho2
 

jimi43

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Last year I picked up some pitch pine flooring from a next door neighbour who was emigrating....-



Since it was only £25 I couldn't turn it down....but it's taking me a while to pluck up courage to lay it! :oops:

All I am doing at the moment is watching the pile closely to ensure the new puppy doesn't think it's yet another foodstuff! :mrgreen:

Jim
 

Smiffla

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In the 1950s, I spent 12 months at HMS Ganges. All the mess-deck floors were parquet, and were exceedingly well-cared for. Along with my fellow recruits I spent countless hours on hands and knees, hand brushing individual blocks (along the grain :cry: ) with boot brushes and wax; especially my own 'bed-space'. So, despite the appearance of the blocks, I have an aversion to parquet flooring. Still, as said, it does look good.


John you ol' salty sea dog you!

Funnily enough i happen to be a matelot myself! on my submarine at the mo which is why im postin this so early in the day (im sure you understand)!

We dont have parquet anymore, sounds like a nightmare of a job! We got thick rubber laminate down now. Just finished scrubbin it and puttin a layer of polish on actually. Happy days!

coincidently, I remember when i was a recruit winning the Ganges cup. Small world eh?

Anyway second of polish me thinks.

Yours aye

Smudge
 

coyot

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Smudge,
if I have a good memory, Bona said it was 12 m2/litre.
Cheers, Frank
 
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