Hubris? Or an experiment gone wrong.

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Cabinetman

Established Member
Joined
5 Jan 2017
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Location
lincolnshire Wolds
About 10 years ago I built an Oak coffee table with small Brown Oak panels (3.5” x 5”) loosely trapped within a framework forming the top of the table, with no allowance was made for expansion. It was successful, probably because the outer frame was a stout 1.5” x 2” Oak M and T frame.
So being cocky at my success in rewriting the rules of woodwork I thought I would make a similar much larger piece, a sideboard. I had visions of breaking into the well heeled London market, and this thing was going to be a bit bling with reversible silver or gold surrounds to the door and drawer panels, sounds bloody awful now!
The insides of the cabinet were solid Oak, the back was made up of 5” planks with a reeded edge and the base and divisions were solid Oak lipped with Brown Oak set in frames again, these looked superb to my eye, but again defying the rules!
All was going well but it had to be put to one side for other work, on returning to it the error of my ways started to become apparent, there was some movement. More than a little disheartened it got put to one side again.
Then later there was a fire next door with a lot of water in the workshop, my roof was damaged in the fire which got worse whilst I was away for 3 months and the workshop was decidedly damp upon my return. Now I look at the sideboard and joints have opened here and there and it’s in a sorry state.
I am selling my workshop and this has to go so it’s free to anyone willing to take it away. (Nth Lincolnshire DN 31) either as a project or you can cut it up for the nice Oak.
Lesson learned, yes you can forcibly stop movement in wood but only up to a point and within reasonable moisture levels.
But who knows, it’s possible if the piece had been moved to a dry house it would have been absolutely fine the way it was built. Ian
Ps I may have some other bits and bobs of timber as well for whoever takes this.
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About 10 years ago I built an Oak coffee table with small Brown Oak panels (3.5” x 5”) loosely trapped within a framework forming the top of the table, with no allowance was made for expansion. It was successful, probably because the outer frame was a stout 1.5” x 2” Oak M and T frame.
So being cocky at my success in rewriting the rules of woodwork I thought I would make a similar much larger piece, a sideboard. I had visions of breaking into the well heeled London market, and this thing was going to be a bit bling with reversible silver or gold surrounds to the door and drawer panels, sounds bloody awful now!
The insides of the cabinet were solid Oak, the back was made up of 5” planks with a reeded edge and the base and divisions were solid Oak lipped with Brown Oak set in frames again, these looked superb to my eye, but again defying the rules!
All was going well but it had to be put to one side for other work, on returning to it the error of my ways started to become apparent, there was some movement. More than a little disheartened it got put to one side again.
Then later there was a fire next door with a lot of water in the workshop, my roof was damaged in the fire which got worse whilst I was away for 3 months and the workshop was decidedly damp upon my return. Now I look at the sideboard and joints have opened here and there and it’s in a sorry state.
I am selling my workshop and this has to go so it’s free to anyone willing to take it away. (Nth Lincolnshire DN 31) either as a project or you can cut it up for the nice Oak.
Lesson learned, yes you can forcibly stop movement in wood but only up to a point and within reasonable moisture levels.
But who knows, it’s possible if the piece had been moved to a dry house it would have been absolutely fine the way it was built. Ian
Ps I may have some other bits and bobs of timber as well for whoever takes this.
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What a shame , the wood is gorgeous and a shame you have to abandon it . It’s probably my eyesight but it doesn’t look that bad - the water damage is evident. Your quality of work is above and beyond but I can understand your frustration and disappointment..
 
What a shame , the wood is gorgeous and a shame you have to abandon it . It’s probably my eyesight but it doesn’t look that bad - the water damage is evident. Your quality of work is above and beyond but I can understand your frustration and disappointment..
That’s very nice thank you, it’s bad! A week in a tent with a dehumidifier might allow the joints to be closed again, but for me time is very short now so it definitely has to go, and I have someone keen to take it off my hands so that’s perfect. There is also a pile of sycamore drawer parts in stick for the lucky chap!
 
That’s very nice thank you, it’s bad! A week in a tent with a dehumidifier might allow the joints to be closed again, but for me time is very short now so it definitely has to go, and I have someone keen to take it off my hands so that’s perfect. There is also a pile of sycamore drawer parts in stick for the lucky chap!
I think that is very generous of you and it can’t be easy to see your hard work end up like this let alone give it away but if it can live again albeit in someone else’s workshop then good on you and god bless you.👍👍👍
 
Shame to let it go after all the work that has gone into it. To restore it I think the brown oak panels would have to be removed. the joints tightened and new panels with a 2 mm veneer cut on the bandsaw let in on a rebate. Very tricky to do but someone will appreciate it.
 
Shame to let it go after all the work that has gone into it. To restore it I think the brown oak panels would have to be removed. the joints tightened and new panels with a 2 mm veneer cut on the bandsaw let in on a rebate. Very tricky to do but someone will appreciate it.
I have just been having a good look at it - it’s falling apart lol.
The brown Oak panels would just tap out as they were always just a very good fit, but I can appreciate your thinking on a repair.
This is a drawer front with the "Bling" I was talking about, what was I thinking of? Mind you I was aiming this piece fair and square at people who like bling, at least there were no Rhinestones or Swarovski diamonds!
 

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